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Advanced Japanese II, Spring 2005
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Continuation of 21F.505. Further development of reading, writing, and oral communication skills. Extension of advanced grammar and further enhancement of advanced vocabulary. Variety of cultural elements studied through readings, video, and discussion. Lab work required. This course covers Lessons 27 through 30 of Japanese: The Spoken Language by Eleanor H. Jordan with Mari Noda. The goal of the course is to continue expanding grammar and vocabulary by further developing four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The goal is to acquire the ability to use Japanese appropriately with increasing spontaneity emphasized, and to be prepared to become an independent learner to the point where you are capable of handling authentic Japanese by yourself, without fear or hesitation.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Nagaya, Yoshimi
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Advanced Workshop in Writing for Social Sciences and Architecture (ELS), Spring 2007
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Advanced subject focusing on techniques, format, and prose style used in academic and professional life. Emphasis on writing as required in fields such as economics, political science, and architecture. Short assignments include: business letters, memos, and proposals that lead toward a written term project. Methods designed to deal with the special problems of those whose first language is not English. Successful completion satisfies Phase II of the Writing Requirement. This workshop is designed to help you write clearly, accurately and effectively in both an academic and a professional environment. In class, we analyze various forms of writing and address problems common to advanced speakers of English. We will often read one another's work.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Brennecke, Patricia W.
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Argumentation and Communication, Fall 2006
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A writing practicum associated with 11.200 and 11.205 that focuses on helping students present their ideas in cogent, persuasive arguments and other analytical frameworks. Reading and writing assignments and other exercises stress the connections between clear thinking, critical reading, and effective writing.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Abbanat, Cherie
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Brehe’s Grammar Anatomy
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Brehe’s Grammar Anatomy makes grammar accessible to general and specialist readers alike. This book provides an in-depth look at beginner grammar terms and concepts, providing clear examples with limited technical jargon. Whether for academic or personal use, Brehe’s Grammar Anatomy is the perfect addition to any resource library.

Table of Contents
Introduction: Grammar? What Grammar?
1 Together Forever: Subjects and Predicates
2 The Indispensables: Nouns and Verbs
3 Get Tense: Verb Tense, Principal Parts, and Irregular Verbs
4 Tall, Dark, and Wordsome: Adjectives
5 Inevitably, Adverbs
6 Among the Prepositions
7 You and I and the Personal Pronouns
8 You Did What?: Verbs and Their Complements
9 All Together Now: Conjunctions, Compounds, and Subordinate Clauses
10 Sentencing Guidelines: Building Sentences with Clauses
11 Relative Clauses, Which We Need
12 I Know That You Know What They Are: Nominal Clauses
13 They’re So Dependent: Distinguishing Dependent Clauses
14 What, More?: Verbs and Voice, Infinitives, and Passive Complements
15 They’re So Common: More on Nouns
16 Zowie!: Interjections and the Eight Parts of Speech
17 Those Verbing Verbals: Gerunds and Participles
18 To Boldly Verb: Infinitives
19 What’s That?: More Pronouns
20 Many Things: (But no Cabbages or Kings)
21 Keeping Those Little Puncs in Line: A Brief Review of Punctuation

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Steven Brehe
Date Added:
06/11/2020
Business Communication for Success
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This book is suited for Business Writing, Business English or Business Research/Report Writing courses.Basics of Written Business Communication presents basic business communication concepts, vocabulary, models, and exercises in a clear, practical, and engaging way. The author provides a set of core chapters intended to provide a highly focused introduction to the field. Then, he provides an optional series of modules that provide instructors with complete flexibility to emphasize additional topics of their choice.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Minnesota
Provider Set:
University of Minnesota Libraries Publishing
Author:
Scott McLean
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Remix
Deutsch im Blick Review
Unrestricted Use
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This is a review of Deutsch im Blick: https://louis.oercommons.org/courses/deutsch-im-blick completed by Caroline Huey, Associate Professor of Germanic Studies, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

Subject:
German
Educational Technology
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Simulation
Student Guide
Textbook
Author:
Caroline Huey
Date Added:
08/03/2020
Deutsch im Blick Syllabus
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This is a first-semester German syllabus using the OER Resource Deutsch im Blick. It correspondes to the following course numbers:UL Lafayette Campus: GERM 101Louisiana Common Course Catalogue: LACC.CGRM 1013, Elementary German I (3 hours)

Subject:
German
Languages
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Caroline Huey
Date Added:
08/04/2020
Developing Writers in Higher Education
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CC BY-NC-ND
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For undergraduates following any course of study, it is essential to develop the ability to write effectively. Yet the processes by which students become more capable and ready to meet the challenges of writing for employers, the wider public, and their own purposes remain largely invisible. Developing Writers in Higher Education shows how learning to write for various purposes in multiple disciplines leads college students to new levels of competence.

This volume draws on an in-depth study of the writing and experiences of 169 University of Michigan undergraduates, using statistical analysis of 322 surveys, qualitative analysis of 131 interviews, use of corpus linguistics on 94 electronic portfolios and 2,406 pieces of student writing, and case studies of individual students to trace the multiple paths taken by student writers. Topics include student writers’ interaction with feedback; perceptions of genre; the role of disciplinary writing; generality and certainty in student writing; students’ concepts of voice and style; students’ understanding of multimodal and digital writing; high school’s influence on college writers; and writing development after college. The digital edition offers samples of student writing, electronic portfolios produced by student writers, transcripts of interviews with students, and explanations of some of the analysis conducted by the contributors.

This is an important book for researchers and graduate students in multiple fields. Those in writing studies get an overview of other longitudinal studies as well as key questions currently circulating. For linguists, it demonstrates how corpus linguistics can inform writing studies. Scholars in higher education will gain a new perspective on college student development. The book also adds to current understandings of sociocultural theories of literacy and offers prospective teachers insights into how students learn to write. Finally, for high school teachers, this volume will answer questions about college writing.


Anne Ruggles Gere is Director of the Sweetland Center for Writing, Professor of English, and Professor of Education at the University of Michigan.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Anne Ruggles Gere Editor
Date Added:
05/01/2019
ENGL 1020: English Composition II: An Integrated Media Approach
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ENGL 1020: English Composition II: An Integrated Media Approach. Continuation and further development of material and strategies introduced in English Composition I. Primary emphasis on composition, including research strategies, argumentative writing, evaluation, and analysis. The course utilizes a scaffolding approach as well as cross-curricular resources and assignments to focus the course around a central theme: Analysis of Film Genres. All resources are OER, including the integration of textbooks: Waymaker: Introduction to College Composition by Lumen and Exploring Movie Construction and Production by John Reich.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Module
Textbook
Provider:
LOUIS: The Louisiana Library Network
Author:
Alyson Blythe
Date Added:
03/11/2021
English Composition I
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course promotes clear and effective communication by sharpening critical thinking and writing skills. The first unit is designed to change the way in which students think about writing--as a conversation rather than a solitary act. The second unit focuses on academic writing and explores the PWR-Writing or Power-Writing Method (PWR Pre-Write, Write, Revise). The remaining units will focus on the minutiae of good writing practices, from style to citation methodology. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Demonstrate mastery of principles of grammar, usage, mechanics, and sentence structure. Identify the thesis in another individual's essay. Develop a thesis statement, structure it in an introductory paragraph, and support it with the body of the essay. Organize ideas logically within an essay, deploying adequate transitional devices to ensure coherence, flow, and focus. Differentiate between rhetorical strategies and write with an awareness of rhetorical technique and audience. Differentiate between tones and write with an awareness of how tone affects the audience's experience. Demonstrate critical and analytical thinking for reading and writing purposes. Quote, paraphrase, and document the work of others. Write sentences that vary in length and structure. (English 001)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Composition and Rhetoric
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Expository Writing for Bilingual Students, Fall 2002
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Formulating, organizing, and presenting ideas clearly in writing. Reviews basic principles of rhetoric. Focuses on development of a topic, thesis, choice of appropriate vocabulary, and sentence structure to achieve purpose. Develops idiomatic prose style. Gives attention to grammar and vocabulary usage. Special focus on strengthening skills of bilingual students. Successful completion satisfies Phase I of the Writing Requirement. The purpose of this course is to develop your writing skills so that you can feel confident writing the essays, term papers, reports, and exams you will have to produce during your career here at MIT. We will read and analyze samples of expository writing, do some work on vocabulary development, and concentrate on developing your ability to write clear, accurate, sophisticated prose. We will also deal with the grammar and mechanical problems you may have trouble with.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Language Education (ESL)
Composition and Rhetoric
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Brennecke, Patricia W.
Date Added:
01/01/2002
German I, Fall 2008
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" This course gives an introduction to German language and culture. The focus is on acquisition of vocabulary and grammatical concepts through active communication. Audio, video, and printed materials provide direct exposure to authentic German language and culture. A self-paced language lab program is fully coordinated with the textbook/workbook. The first semester covers the development of effective basic communication skills."

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Weise, Peter
Date Added:
01/01/2008
German III, Spring 2004
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This course expands skills in speaking, reading, listening, and writing. Students develop analytic and interpretative skills through the reading of a full-length drama as well as short prose and poetry (Biermann, Brecht, DĚ_rrenmatt, Tawada and others) and through media selections on contemporary issues in German-speaking cultures. Coursework includes discussions and compositions based on these texts, and review of grammar and development of vocabulary-building strategies. It is recommended for students with two years of high school German.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jaeger, Dagmar
Date Added:
01/01/2004
German II, Spring 2005
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Expansion of basic communication skills and further development of linguistic competency. Review and completion of basic grammar, building of vocabulary, and practice in writing short essays. Reading of short literary texts. Exposure to history and culture of German-speaking countries through audio, video, and Web materials. In this course students are exposed to history and culture of German-speaking countries through audio, video, and Web materials. It focuses on the expansion of basic communication skills and further development of linguistic competency, and includes the review and completion of basic grammar, building of vocabulary, and practice in writing short essays. Students will also read short literary texts.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Crocker, Ellen
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Grammar of a Less Familiar Language, Spring 2003
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Detailed examination of the grammar of a language whose structure is significantly different from English, with special emphasis on problems of interest in the study of linguistic universals. A native speaker of the language assists when possible. From the course home page Course Description This course is designed to allow participants to engage in the exploration of the grammatical structure of a language that is unknown to them (and typically to the instructors as well). In some ways it simulates traditional field methods research. In terms of format, we work in both group and individual meetings with the consultant. Each student identifies some grammatical construction (e.g. wh questions, agreement, palatalization, interrogative intonation) to focus their research: they elicit and share data and write a report on the material gathered that is to be turned in at the end of the term. Ideally, we can put together a volume of grammatical sketches. The first three to four weeks of the term, our group meetings will explore the basic phonology, morphology and surface syntax for a first pass overview of the language, looking for interesting areas to be explored in more detail later. During this period individual sessions can review material from the general session as well as explore new areas. At roughly the fifth meeting, individual students (typically two to three per session) guide the group elicitations to explore their research topic.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Linguistics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kenstowicz, Michael J.
Date Added:
01/01/2003
High-Intermediate Academic Communication, Spring 2004
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The goal of this course is to review grammar and develop vocabulary building strategies to refine oral and written expression. Speaking and writing assignments are designed to expand communicative competence. Assignments are based on models and materials drawn from contemporary media (newspapers and magazines, television, web). The models, materials, topics and assignments vary from semester to semester.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Yoo, Isaiah WonHo
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Human Dimensions of Global Warming
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GEOG 438W is a writing-intensive course that concentrates on the human-environment interactions involved in contemporary and future global warming. The course comprises two broad topical areas: global warming impacts, which takes place in the first half of the course, and global warming mitigation and policy, which encompasses the second half of the course. Each week highlights a theme, such as the impacts of climate change on human health or greenhouse gas emissions from transportation, that weaves through the course lecture, reading assignment, class discussion, and writing activity.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Communication
Public Relations
Environmental Studies
History
Composition and Rhetoric
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Physical Geography
Cultural Geography
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State University
Provider Set:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http:// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Brandi Robinson
Brent Yarnal
Date Added:
04/25/2019
Learning Chinese: A Foundation Course in Mandarin, Spring 2011
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This online textbook represents materials that were used in the first four semesters (two years) of the Mandarin program at MIT. They eventually formed the basis of a print textbook of the same name, published by Yale University Press; information and supplemental materials for the Yale edition are available at the companion website. The OCW course materials were extensively revised, and at times reordered, before publication, but the general principles of the original remain: to provide a comprehensive resource for the foundation levels of Chinese language that separates the learning of oral skills from literary (the former being transcribed in pinyin, and the latter in characters). This resource contains the complete online version of the text and accompanying audio recordings.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Wheatley, Julian K.
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Let's Get Writing!
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This introduction is designed to exemplify how writers think about and produce text.

Table of Contents
Chapter 1 - Critical Reading
Chapter 2 - Rhetorical Analysis
Chapter 3 - Argument
Chapter 4 - The Writing Process
Chapter 5 - Rhetorical Modes
Chapter 6 - Finding and Using Outside Sources
Chapter 7 - How and Why to Cite
Chapter 8 - Writing Basics: What Makes a Good Sentence?
Chapter 9 - Punctuation
Chapter 10 - Working With Words: Which Word is Right?

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Elizabeth Browning
Jenifer Kurtz
Katelyn Burton
Kathy Boylan
Kirsten DeVries
Date Added:
06/11/2020