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  • The Saylor Foundation
ARTH101: Art Appreciation
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CC BY
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This course is an exploration of visual art forms and their cultural connections for the student with little experience in the visual arts. It includes a brief study of art history, and in-depth studies of the elements, media, and methods used in creative thought and processes. It is the only resource I have found that approximates techniques, media, and an overview of different processes that is usually the first half of a printed text on art appreciation or an introduction to art. This is geared toward an undergraduate, lower-level student population. The art history survey is inadequate, but combined with another source, like Boundless' art history, this can be a complete text for an Art 100 course.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Assessment
Lecture
Module
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Unit of Study
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Author:
Afshan Bokhari
Amy Gansell
Andrew E. Hershberger
Andrew Marvick
Anne Bertrand-Dewsnap
Denise Rogers
Hilda Werschkul
Jelena Bogdanovic
Jennifer Palinkas
Jill Kiefer
Lynn E. Roller
Marjorie Munsterberg
Michelle Greet
Shaoqian Zhang
Tracy Musacchio
William V. Ganis
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Advanced Artificial Intelligence
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CC BY
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This course will present advanced topics in Artificial Intelligence (AI), including inquiries into logic, artificial neural network and machine learning, and the Turing machine. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: define the term 'intelligent agent,' list major problems in AI, and identify the major approaches to AI; translate problems into graphs and encode the procedures that search the solutions with the graph data structures; explain the differences between various types of logic and basic statistical tools used in AI; list the different types of learning algorithms and explain why they are different; list the most common methods of statistical learning and classification and explain the basic differences between them; describe the components of Turing machine; name the most important propositions in the philosophy of AI; list the major issues pertaining to the creation of machine consciousness; design a reasonable software agent with java code. (Computer Science 408)

Subject:
Computer Science
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Advanced Business Law and the Legal Environment
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Law has different meanings as well as different functions. Philosophers have considered issues of justice and law for centuries, and several different approaches, or schools of legal thought, have emerged. In this chapter, we will look at those different meanings and approaches and will consider how social and political dynamics interact with the ideas that animate the various schools of legal thought. We will also look at typical sources of “positive law” in the United States and how some of those sources have priority over others, and we will set out some basic differences between the US legal system and other legal systems.

Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction to Law and Legal Systems
Chapter 2: Corporate Social Responsibility and Business Ethics
Chapter 3: Courts and the Legal Process
Chapter 4: Constitutional Law and US Commerce
Chapter 5: Administrative Law
Chapter 6: Criminal Law
Chapter 7: Introduction to Tort Law
Chapter 8: Introduction to Sales and Leases
Chapter 9: Title and Risk of Loss
Chapter 10: Performance and Remedies
Chapter 11: Products Liability
Chapter 12: Bailments and the Storage, Shipment, and Leasing of Goods
Chapter 13: Nature and Form of Commercial Paper
Chapter 14: Negotiation of Commercial Paper
Chapter 15: Holder in Due Course and Defenses
Chapter 16: Liability and Discharge
Chapter 17: Legal Aspects of Banking
Chapter 18: Consumer Credit Transactions
Chapter 19: Secured Transactions and Suretyship
Chapter 20: Mortgages and Nonconsensual Liens
Chapter 21: Bankruptcy
Chapter 22: Introduction to Property: Personal Property and Fixtures
Chapter 23: Intellectual Property
Chapter 24: The Nature and Regulation of Real Estate and the Environment
Chapter 25: The Transfer of Real Estate by Sale
Chapter 26: Landlord and Tenant Law
Chapter 27: Estate Planning: Wills, Estates, and Trusts
Chapter 28: Insurance

Subject:
Business and Communication
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Provider Set:
Saylor Textbooks
Author:
Alyssa Martina
Don Mayer
George Siedel
Jethro Lieberman
Date Added:
04/24/2019
Advanced Databases
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course will expand upon SQL as well as other advanced topics, including query optimization, concurrency, data warehouses, object-oriented extensions, and XML. Additional topics covered in this course will help you become more proficient in writing queries and will expand your knowledge base so that you have a better understanding of the field. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: write complex queries, including full outer joins, self-joins, sub queries, and set theoretic queries; write stored procedures and triggers; apply the principles of query optimization to a database schema; explain the various types of locking mechanisms utilized within database management systems; explain the different types of database failures as well as the methods used to recover from these failures; design queries against a distributed database management system; perform queries against database designed with object-relational extensions; develop and query XML files. (Computer Science 410)

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Advanced Statistics
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course is oriented toward US high school students. The course is divided into 10 units of study. The first five units build the foundation of concepts, vocabulary, knowledge, and skills for success in the remainder of the course. In the final five units, we will take the plunge into the domain of inferential statistics, where we make statistical decisions based on the data that we have collected.

Subject:
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/04/2019
Algebra
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course discusses how to use algebra for a variety of everyday tasks, such as calculate change without specifying how much money is to be spent on a purchase, analyzing relationships by graphing, and describing real-world situations in business, accounting, and science.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Algorithms
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course focuses on the fundamentals of computer algorithms, emphasizing methods useful in practice. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: explain and identify the importance of algorithms in modern computing systems and their place as a technology in the computing industry; indentify algorithms as a pseudo-code to solve some common problems; describe asymptotic notations for bounding algorithm running times from above and below; explain methods for solving recurrences useful in describing running times of recursive algorithms; explain the use of Master Theorem in describing running times of recursive algorithms; describe the divide-and-conquer recursive technique for solving a class of problems; describe sorting algorithms and their runtime complexity analysis; describe the dynamic programming technique for solving a class of problems; describe greedy algorithms and their applications; describe concepts in graph theory, graph-based algorithms, and their analysis; describe tree-based algorithms and their analysis; explain the classification of difficult computer science problems as belonging to P, NP, and NP-hard classes. (Computer Science 303)

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
The American Renaissance
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

The ĺÎĺ_ĺĚĄ_American Renaissance,ĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺÎĺ a period of tremendous literary activity that took place in America between the 1830s and 1860s represents the cultivation of a distinctively American literature. The student will begin this course by looking at what it was in American culture and society that led to the dramatic outburst of literary creativity in this era. The student will then explore some of the periodĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s most famous works, attempting to define the emerging American identity represented in this literature. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: discriminate among the key economic, technological, social, and cultural transformations underpinning the American Renaissance; define the transformations in American Protestantism exemplified by the second Great Awakening and transcendentalism; list the key tenets of transcendentalism and relate them to romanticism more broadly and to social and cultural developments in the antebellum United States; analyze EmersonĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s place in defining transcendentalism and his key differences from other transcendentalists; analyze competing conceptualizations of poetry and its construction and purpose, with particular attention to Poe, Emerson, and Whitman; define the formal innovations of Dickinson and their relationship to her central themes; describe the emergence of the short story as a form, with reference to specific stories by Hawthorne and Poe; distinguish among forms of the novel, with reference to specific works by Hawthorne, Thompson, and Fern; analyze the ways that writers such as Melville, Brownson, Davis, and Thoreau saw industrialization and capitalism as a threat to U. S. society; develop the relationship between ThoreauĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s interest in nature and his political commitments and compare and contrast his thinking with Emerson and other transcendentalists; analyze the different ways that sentimentalism constrained and empowered women writers to critique gender conventions, with reference to specific works by writers such as Fern, Alcott, and Stowe; define the ways that the slavery question influenced major texts and major controversies over literature during this period. This free course may be completed online at any time. (English Literature 405)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Artificial Intelligence
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course includes materials on AI programming, logic, search, game playing, machine learning, natural language understanding, and robotics, which will introduce the student to AI methods, tools, and techniques, their application to computational problems, and their contribution to understanding intelligence. The material is introductory; the readings cite many resources outside those assigned in this course, and students are encouraged to explore these resources to pursue topics of interest. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Describe the major applications, topics, and research areas of artificial intelligence (AI), including search, machine learning, knowledge representation and inference, natural language processing, vision, and robotics; Apply basic techniques of AI in computational solutions to problems; Discuss the role of AI research areas in growing the understanding of human intelligence; Identify the boundaries of the capabilities of current AI systems. (Computer Science 405)

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Beginning Algebra
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course is also intended to provide the student with a strong foundation for intermediate algebra and beyond. Upon successful completion of this course, you will be able to: simplify and solve linear equations and expressions including problems with absolute values and applications; solve linear inequalities; find equations of lines; and solve application problems; add, subtract, multiply, and divide various types of polynomials; factor polynomials, and simplify square roots; evaluate, simplify, multiply, divide, add, and subtract rational expressions, and solve basic applications of rational expressions. This free course may be completed online at any time. It has been developed through a partnership with the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges; the Saylor Foundation has modified some WSBCTC materials. (Mathematics 001)

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Building Strategy and Performance
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

The defining challenge facing business leaders is to develop and drive performance into the future.
For commercial firms, this generally means building profits and growing the value of the business.
Although their focus may be on non-financial outcomes, public services, voluntary groups, and other
not-for-profit organizations share the same central challenge—continually improving their
performance. When the causes of performance through time are not understood, management has
difficulty making the right decisions about important issues. Worse, entire organizations are led into
ill-chosen strategies for their future.
To overcome these problems, leaders need the means to answer three basic questions:
1. Why is business performance following its current path?
2. Where are current policies, decisions, and strategy leading us?
3. How can future prospects be improved?
These questions are the starting point for this book.

Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Performance Through Time
Chapter 2: Resources: Vital Drivers of Performance
Chapter 3: Resources and Bathtub Behavior
Chapter 4: Handling Interdependence Between Resources
Chapter 5: Building and Managing the Strategic Architecture
Chapter 6: You Need Quality Resources as Well as Quantity
Chapter 7: Managing Rivalry for Customers and Other Resources
Chapter 8: Intangible Resources and Capabilities
Chapter 9: Going Forward

Subject:
Business and Communication
Management
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Provider Set:
Saylor Textbooks
Author:
Kim Warren
Date Added:
04/24/2019
Business English for Success
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Business English for Success provides instruction in steps, builds writing, reading, and critical thinking, and combines comprehensive grammar review with an introduction to paragraph writing and composition. Beginning with the sentence and its essential elements, this book addresses each concept with clear, concise, and effective examples that are immediately reinforced with exercises and opportunities to demonstrate learning.

Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Writing Basics: What Makes a Good Sentence?
Chapter 2: Punctuation
Chapter 3: Working with Words: Which Word Is Right?
Chapter 4: Help for English Language Learners
Chapter 5: Writing Paragraphs: Separating Ideas and Shaping Content
Chapter 6: Refining Your Writing: How Do I Improve My Writing Technique?
Chapter 7: The Writing Process: How Do I Begin?
Chapter 8: Writing Essays: From Start to Finish
Chapter 9: Effective Business Writing
Chapter 10: Writing Preparation
Chapter 11: Writing
Chapter 12: Revising and Presenting Your Writing
Chapter 13: Business Writing in Action
Chapter 14: APA and MLA Documentation and Formatting

Subject:
Business and Communication
Language Education (ESL)
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Provider Set:
Saylor Textbooks
Author:
Scott McLean
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Business Law and Ethics
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Law, in its simplest form, is used to protect one party from another. For instance, laws protect customers from being exploited by companies. Laws protect companies from other companies. Laws even protect citizens and corporations from the government. However, law is neither perfect nor all encompassing. This course will introduce the student to the laws and ethical standards that managers must abide by in the course of conducting business. Laws and ethics almost always shape a company's decision-making process; a bank cannot charge any interest rate it wants to charge that rate must be appropriate. By the end of this course, the student will have a clear understanding of the legal and ethical environment in which businesses operate. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify sources of law in the United States; Describe the function and role of courts in the US legal system; Differentiate litigation from methods of alternative dispute resolution; List the elements of the major torts; List the essential elements of a valid contract; Describe how a contract can fail; Summarize the remedies available for breach of contract; Distinguish between real and personal property; Identify the various interests in real property and how they pass; Identify the requirements to hold various rights under intellectual property laws; Analyze the impact of the digital era on intellectual property rights; Distinguish between at-will employment and contractual employment; Identify laws that generally regulate the employer-employee relationship; Identify criminal acts related to the business world; Define white collar crime; Describe the various forms of business organization; Identify the major laws regulating business in the United States; Identify major ethical concerns in business today. (Business Administration 205)

Subject:
Business and Communication
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
09/07/2018
Business Law and the Legal Environment
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Provides context and essential concepts across the entire range of legal issues with which managers and business executives must grapple. The text provides the vocabulary and legal acumen necessary for business people to talk in an educated way to their customers, employees, suppliers, government officials—and to their own lawyers.

Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction to Law and Legal Systems
Chapter 2: Corporate Social Responsibility and Business Ethics
Chapter 3: Courts and the Legal Process
Chapter 4: Constitutional Law and US Commerce
Chapter 6: Criminal Law
Chapter 7: Introduction to Tort Law
Chapter 8: Introduction to Contract Law
Chapter 9: The Agreement
Chapter 10: Real Assent
Chapter 11: Consideration
Chapter 12: Legality
Chapter 13: Form and Meaning
Chapter 14: Third-Party Rights
Chapter 15: Discharge of Obligations
Chapter 16: Remedies
Chapter 17: Introduction to Sales and Leases
Chapter 18: Title and Risk of Loss
Chapter 19: Performance and Remedies
Chapter 20: Products Liability
Chapter 21: Bailments and the Storage, Shipment, and Leasing of Goods
Chapter 22: Nature and Form of Commercial Paper
Chapter 23: Negotiation of Commercial Paper
Chapter 24: Holder in Due Course and Defenses
Chapter 25: Liability and Discharge
Chapter 26: Legal Aspects of Banking
Chapter 27: Consumer Credit Transactions
Chapter 28: Secured Transactions and Suretyship
Chapter 29: Mortgages and Nonconsensual Liens
Chapter 30: Bankruptcy
Chapter 31: Introduction to Property: Personal Property and Fixtures
Chapter 32: Intellectual Property
Chapter 33: The Nature and Regulation of Real Estate and the Environment
Chapter 34: The Transfer of Real Estate by Sale
Chapter 35: Landlord and Tenant Law
Chapter 36: Estate Planning: Wills, Estates, and Trusts
Chapter 37: Insurance
Chapter 38: Relationships between Principal and Agent
Chapter 39: Liability of Principal and Agent; Termination of Agency
Chapter 40: Partnerships: General Characteristics and Formation
Chapter 41: Partnership Operation and Termination
Chapter 42: Hybrid Business Forms
Chapter 43: Corporation: General Characteristics and Formation
Chapter 44: Legal Aspects of Corporate Finance
Chapter 45: Corporate Powers and Management
Chapter 46: Securities Regulation
Chapter 47: Corporate Expansion, State and Federal Regulation of Foreign Corporations, and Corporate Dissolution
Chapter 48: Antitrust Law
Chapter 49: Unfair Trade Practices and the Federal Trade Commission
Chapter 50: Employment Law
Chapter 51: Labor-Management Relations
Chapter 52: International Law
Chapter 53: Contracts

Subject:
Business and Communication
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Provider Set:
Saylor Textbooks
Author:
Daniel Warner
Don Mayer
George Siedel
Date Added:
09/07/2018
Business Processes and Information Technology
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Business Processes and Information Technology prepares students to effectively use, manage, and participate in the development of information technology applications in support of common business processes. The text focuses on the interconnections among an organization’s management, business processes, information systems, and information technology. An emphasis is given throughout the text to the governance, control, and security of business processes and information systems, especially underlying financial information systems. After studying this text, a student will walk away with an understanding of the foundation tools and knowledge required for the analysis, design, and control of IT-driven business processes using current and emergent technologies.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Management
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Provider Set:
Saylor Textbooks
Author:
Jane Fedorowicz
Steve G. Sutton
Ulric J. Gelinas
Date Added:
09/07/2018
Business Statistics
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Introductory survey of quantitative methods (QM), or the application of statistics in the workplace. Examines techniques for gathering, analyzing, and interpreting data in any number of fieldsĺÎĺ from anthropology to hedge fund management.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Management
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Provider Set:
Saylor Textbooks
Date Added:
09/07/2018
C++ Programming
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

The student will learn the mechanics of editing and compiling a simple program written in C++ beginning with a discussion of the essential elements of C++ programming: variables, loops, expressions, functions, and string class. Next, the student will cover the basics of object-oriented programming: classes, inheritance, templates, exceptions, and file manipulation. The student will then review function and class templates and the classes that perform output and input of characters to/from files. This course will also cover the topics of namespaces, exception handling, and preprocessor directives. In the last part of the course, the student will learn some slightly more sophisticated programming techniques that deal with data structures such as linked lists and binary trees. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Compile and execute code written in C++ language; Work with the elementary data types and conditional and iteration structures; Define and use functions, pointers, arrays, struct, unions, and enumerations; Write C++ using principles of object-oriented programming; Write templates and manipulate the files; Code and use namespaces, exceptions, and preprocessor instructions; Write a code that represents linked lists and binary trees; Translate simple word problems into C++ language. (Computer Science 107)

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Calculus I
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course begins with a review of algebra specifically designed to help and prepare the student for the study of calculus, and continues with discussion of functions, graphs, limits, continuity, and derivatives. The appendix provides a large collection of reference facts, geometry, and trigonometry that will assist in solving calculus problems long after the course is over. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: calculate or estimate limits of functions given by formulas, graphs, or tables by using properties of limits and LĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_hopitalĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s Rule; state whether a function given by a graph or formula is continuous or differentiable at a given point or on a given interval and justify the answer; calculate average and instantaneous rates of change in context, and state the meaning and units of the derivative for functions given graphically; calculate derivatives of polynomial, rational, common transcendental functions, and implicitly defined functions; apply the ideas and techniques of derivatives to solve maximum and minimum problems and related rate problems, and calculate slopes and rates for function given as parametric equations; find extreme values of modeling functions given by formulas or graphs; predict, construct, and interpret the shapes of graphs; solve equations using NewtonĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s Method; find linear approximations to functions using differentials; festate in words the meanings of the solutions to applied problems, attaching the appropriate units to an answer; state which parts of a mathematical statement are assumptions, such as hypotheses, and which parts are conclusions. This free course may be completed online at any time. It has been developed through a partnership with the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges; the Saylor Foundation has modified some WSBCTC materials. (Mathematics 005)

Subject:
Calculus
Functions
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Chapter 1 Section 5: Conventions and Standards
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

In this reading, you will learn about the rules that govern accounting. Pay particular attention the second section of this reading, on the US Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, or GAAP. GAAP sets the rules which accounts follow when making journal entries. GAAP standardizes accounting so that comparisons can be made among companies by outside parties. Investors, creditors, even employees count on the consistency of financial reporting in order to evaluate operations.

Subject:
Accounting
Material Type:
Lecture
Module
Reading
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Author:
Boundless
Date Added:
12/05/2018