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Abnormal Behavior
Conditions of Use:
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This course will help to define abnormal and normal behaviors and to group these abnormal phenomena into 'disorders.' It will cover the basic concepts surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of abnormal psychological phenomena. The student will investigate the characteristics, epidemiology, controversy, and treatment of individual disorders. The student will begin by defining normal versus abnormal behavior and reviewing the historical context in which abnormal psychology emerged, then discuss the major theories or paradigms associated with abnormal psychology, the classification system used to differentiate and define disorders, and the research methods often utilized in the study of abnormal psychology. Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to: describe the historical context from which the current conceptualization of abnormal psychology has evolved; identify and describe the main theoretical perspectives/paradigms which have influenced the field of abnormal psychology; identify and differentiate the classification of psychological disorders; evaluate treatment approaches; explain the major research findings for each group of disorders and how they add to our knowledge of the causes and treatment of psychological disorders. (Psychology 401)

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Advanced Emergency Trauma
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

In 2009, the University of Michigan Department of Emergency Medicine working with global health partners at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH), Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), Ghana College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the Ghana Ministry of Health established the Ghana Emergency Medicine Collaborative. The overall goal of the collaborative is to improve the provision of emergency care in Ghana through the development of physician, nursing and medical student training programs. This NIH-Fogarty International Center funded project also explores the use of new educational modalities such as open educational resources to provide education in Ghana. ** As part of this project, a 5-day Advanced Emergency Trauma Course (AETC) was constructed utilizing curricular materials from existing U.S. based emergency medicine residencies with modification to the available resources of developing Low-Middle Income Countries (LMICs) such as Ghana. The course, which was designed by University of Michigan and University of Utah Emergency Medicine Faculty includes 20 hours of didactic teaching material in open educational resource format, low-cost simulation models for procedural training and assessment tools. Attached are the full 20 hours of didactic materials in OER format. The full course is available by contacting the course director, Patrick Carter at cartpatr@gmail.com.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Reading
Author:
Carl Seger
Daniel Wachter
Patrick Carter
Rockefeller Oteng
Date Added:
03/23/2020
African-American Literature
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course considers the impact of storytelling and spirituals on the literary production of African American authors from the Colonial period to the current day, examining the cultural, historical, and political contexts of the literature, as well as how the issues of gender, race, and class affect the production and meaning of these works. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: identify the cultural influences and the development of African American literature; analyze the evolution of African American literature from an oral to a literary tradition; define the functions of African American literature from its inception in the period of slavery to the contemporary period; identify the major authors and/or literary works in the various literary periods and movements (Reconstruction to the New Negro Renaissance Movement; Harlem Renaissance; Realism, Naturalism, and modernism; Black Arts; and the Contemporary Period). This free course may be completed online at any time. (English Literature 411)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
African Politics
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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This course will provide the student with a broad overview of African politics placed within the context of Africa's recent history, taking into account Africa's colonial relationships and then the post-colonial period. This course will analyze on the internal workings and challenges of African states, including their movements towards democratization, their economic statuses, the connections between their governmental and non-governmental institutions/organizations, and the various ways in which their societies and cultures impact their politics. This course also asks questions about the nature of Africa's conflicts, reviewing larger trends within Africa's political economy, and inquiring about the promise of continental and sub-continental political integration efforts. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: explain how colonialism and independence movements contributed to and shaped contemporary African statehood; identify the main causes of state and political failure in Africa; define underdevelopment and explain the causes of economic failure in Africa; discuss the causes of civil and interstate conflict in Africa; apply knowledge of Africa's history to explain current causes of crisis and the roles of different actors within the state and international community; compare and contrast economically and politically stable states with those that are unstable and identify the main features of stability; identify and explain some of the major social, cultural, and economic challenges (such as HIV/AIDS) that contemporary African states face, as well as the role international actors play in addressing these challenges. (Political Science 325)

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
The Age of Revolutions in the Atlantic World, 1776-1848
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course introduces the history of the Age of Revolutions in the Atlantic World from 1776 to 1848. Running alongside and extending beyond these political revolutions is the First Industrial Revolution. The Atlantic World, dominated by European empires in 1776, was transformed through revolution into a series of independent states by 1848, experiencing profound changes through the development and consolidation of capitalism. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: think analytically about the history of the revolutionary age between 1776 and 1848; define what a revolution" means as well as describe what made 1776-1848 an "age of revolution"; define the concept of the Atlantic World and describe its importance in World History; explain the basic intellectual and technical movements associated with the Enlightenment and their relations to the revolutionary movements that follow; identify and describe the causes of the American Revolution; identify and describe the many stages of the French Revolution: the end of absolutist monarchy, the implementation of constitutional monarchy, and the rise of the Jacobin Republic; compare and contrast the Declaration of the Rights of Man and other major statements of the Revolutionary period and Enlightenment thinking; identify and describe the impact of the first successful slave rebellion in world history--the Haitian Revolution; compare and contrast the debate between Edmund Burke and Thomas Paine; analyze and interpret primary source documents that elucidate the causes and effects of the Age of Revolutions. This free course may be completed online at any time. (History 303)

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
02/20/2019
The Age of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1500-1900
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course will introduce the student to the history of the Atlantic slave trade from 1500 to 1900. The student will learn about the slave trade, its causes, and its effects on Africa, Europe, and the Americas. By the end of the course, the student will understand how the Atlantic slave trade began as a fledgling enterprise of the English, Portuguese, and Spanish in the 1500s and why, by the mid-eighteenth century, the trade dominated Atlantic societies and economies. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: think analytically about the various meanings of 'slave' and 'slavery' during the age of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the 'triangular trade' and define the Atlantic World; identify and describe the logic for enslavement of Africans by Europeans; identify and describe the African ethnic groups enslaved by Europeans and those captives' New World destinations; identify and describe the early slaving voyages of the Portuguese and Spanish. Students will also be able to describe how the Dutch and English later inserted themselves into the trade; identify and describe the expansion of the plantation complex in the New World in the 1600s and its impact on the Atlantic slave trade; identify and analyze the rise of European empires and the parallel expansion of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and analyze slavery within African societies. They will also be able to identify and describe the trans-Saharan slave trade and the Red Sea/Indian Ocean slave trade; identify and describe the nature of the African slave market and principal slaving ports in western Africa; analyze and describe New World slave societies and their impact on the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the 'Middle Passage' of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the causes for the abolition of the Atlantic slave trade in the nineteenth century; analyze and interpret primary source documents that elucidate all aspects of the Atlantic slave trade. (History 311)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
02/20/2019
Algoritmiek
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This course treats various methods to design and analyze datastructures and algorithms for a wide range of problems. The most important new datastructure treated is the graph, and the general methods introduced are: greedy algorithms, divide and conquer, dynamic programming and network flow algorithms. These general methods are explained by a number of concrete examples, such as simple scheduling algorithms, Dijkstra, Ford-Fulkerson, minimum spanning tree, closest-pair-of-points, knapsack, and Bellman-Ford. Throughout this course there is significant attention to proving the correctness of the discussed algorithms. All material for this course is in English. The recorded lectures, however, are in Dutch.

Subject:
Engineering
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Delft University of Technology
Provider Set:
Delft University OpenCourseWare
Author:
M. de Weerdt
Date Added:
04/25/2019
American Art
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course surveys art of America from the colonial era through the post-war 20th century. The student will consider broad stylistic tendencies in various regions and periods and examine specific artists and works of art in historical and social contexts, with emphasis on the congruent evolution of contemporary American multi-cultural identity. Overarching issues that have interested major scholars of American art and its purview include the landscape (wilderness, Manifest Destiny, rural settlement, and urban development); the family and gender roles; the founding rhetoric of freedom and antebellum slavery; and notions of artistic modernism through the 20th century. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Understand the historical (geographic, political) formation of the present United States of America; Be familiar with renowned influential American artists from the 18th through the 20th century; Be conversant in common stylistic designations used in Western art of the 17th through 20th centuries; Recognize subjects and forms in American art through history that mark its distinction; Be able to engage specific images, objects, and structures from different critical perspectives to consider their functions and meanings. (Art History 210)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
American Political Thought
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course will cover American political thought from the nation's founding through the 1960s, exploring the political theories that have shaped its governance. As there is no one philosopher or idea that represents the totality of American political thought, the student will survey the writings and speeches of those who have had the greatest impact over this period of time. Much of the study required in this course is based on the original texts and speeches of those who influenced political thought throughout American history. The student will learn and understand the impact that their views and actions have had on the modern American state. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the religious and political origins of the American political system; explain how Enlightenment thinkers, such as John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and Baron de Montesquieu, influenced the political philosophies of American founding fathers; analyze how the colonial American experience shaped many of the core values represented in American government and expressed in the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution; compare and contrast the differing opinions on the role of the government that the founders expressed; trace the development and evolution of the concepts of 'states rights' and 'federal (national) supremacy'; connect the observations of De Tocqueville in Democracy in America to the concepts of equality, individuality, and civic engagement in American political discourse; examine the evolution of race in the American political system (from slavery to the 2008 election of Barack Obama); discuss the changes in the political role of women in America from its colonial days to the present; connect the concept of 'American Exceptionalism' to the industrial revolution, capitalism, and imperialism; analyze the roots of reform in the Progressive Era and their impact on modern political discourse; explain major principles of American foreign relations over time; assess the purpose and impact of ĺÎĺĺĺŤAmerican war rhetoricĄ_ĺĺö over time; differentiate between 'liberal' and 'conservative' political beliefs in modern American government; illustrate how the political turmoil in the 1960s greatly shaped contemporary American political discourse; evaluate the current political discourse as represented in the 2008 and 2010 elections. (Political Science 301)

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Ancient Civilizations of the World
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

In this course, the student will study the emergence of the major civilizations of the ancient world, beginning with the Paleolithic Era (about 2.5 million years ago) and finishing with the end of the Middle Ages in fifteenth century A.D. The student will pay special attention to how societies evolved across this expanse of time - from fragmented and primitive agricultural communities to more advanced and consolidated civilizations. By the end of the course, the student will possess a thorough understanding of important overarching social, political, religious, and economic themes in the ancient world, ranging from the emergence of Confucian philosophy in Asia to the fall of imperial Rome. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify and define the world's earliest civilizations, including the Neolithic Revolution, and describe how it shaped the development of these early civilizations; Identify, describe, and compare/contrast the first advanced civilizations in the world - Mesopotamia and Egypt; Identify and describe the emergence of the earliest civilizations in Asia: the Harappan and Aryan societies on the Indian subcontinent and the Shang and Zhou societies in China; Identify and describe the emergence of new philosophies - Daoism and Confucianism - during the Warring States period in China. Identify and describe the subsequent rise of the Qin and Han dynasties; Identify and describe the different periods that characterized ancient Greece - Archaic Greece (or the Greek Dark Ages), classical Greece, and the Hellenistic era; Identify and describe the characteristics of the Roman Kingdom, the Roman Republic, and Imperial Rome; Analyze the emergence of the Mauryan and Gupta empires during the 'classical age' in India; Identify and analyze the Buddhist and Vedic (Hindu) faiths; Identify and describe the rise of civilizations in the Americas, particularly in Meso and South America; Analyze and describe the rise of Islam in the Middle East; Identify and describe the emergence of the Arab caliphate, the Umayyad dynasty, and Abbasid dynasty; Identify and describe the rise and fall of the Byzantine Empire; Identify and analyze key facets of medieval society in Western EuropeĺÎĺĚ_ĺÜthe Catholic Church, feudalism, and the rise of technology and commerce; Analyze and interpret primary-source documents that elucidate the exchanges and advancements made in civilizations across time and space. (History 101)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
02/20/2019
The Anthropocene, Overview
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This presentation offers an overview of the developing concept of The Anthropocene -- a term coined to describe our current geological epoch, in which human impact on the planet will leave a permanent trace.

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Borough of Manhattan Community College
Author:
Scott W. Schwartz
Date Added:
05/11/2017
Antigen presentation and CTL
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

How a cell infected by a virus signals cytotoxic T lymphocytes to kill the cell before the virus replicates and spreads. This video is two minutes and 34 seconds in length, and available in Quick Time (11 MB) and Windows Media Player (23 MB). All Infection Disease Animations are located at: http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/disease/animations.html.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Biology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Date Added:
06/12/2012
Arabic for Beginners (Youtube Channel)
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Master the Arabic Letters is a video series consisting of eight videos that introduce viewers to the names, shapes, and sounds of the Arabic letters. The videos also explain how to join up the letters in writing and make sure that differences in pronunciation are carefully demonstrated.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Sibaway Institute for Arabic and Quranic Studies
Date Added:
11/11/2019
Art Appreciation and Techniques
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This course is an exploration of visual art forms and their cultural connections for the student with little experience in the visual arts. It includes a brief study of art history, and in-depth studies of the elements, media, and methods used in creative thought and processes. It is the only resource I have found that approximates techniques, media, and an overview of different processes that is usually the first half of a printed text on art appreciation or an introduction to art. This is geared toward an undergraduate, lower-level student population. The art history survey is inadequate, but combined with another source, like Boundless' art history, this can be a complete text for an Art 100 course.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Assessment
Lecture
Module
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Unit of Study
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Author:
Afshan Bokhari
Amy Gansell
Andrew E. Hershberger
Andrew Marvick
Anne Bertrand-Dewsnap
Denise Rogers
Hilda Werschkul
Jelena Bogdanovic
Jennifer Palinkas
Jill Kiefer
Lynn E. Roller
Marjorie Munsterberg
Michelle Greet
Shaoqian Zhang
Tracy Musacchio
William V. Ganis
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Art Historical Methodologies
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course is an introduction to the major methodologies used by art historians. Although not a history of art history per se, it is organized in a roughly chronological order that traces major methodological developments within the discipline from the birth of art history in the nineteenth century through the late twentieth century. The course will also examine how artworks are displayed in modern art museums. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Explain what art historians study and what kinds of questions they ask about works of art; Identify major art historical methodologies and their associated theories and theorists; Write a critical summary of a piece of art historical scholarship; Explain the major aspects of the methodological approaches outlined in this course and how they relate to the philosophical, historical, and social context in which they first appeared; Explain how different methodologies can be used to analyze works of art; Compare and contrast major art historical methodologies; Use different art historical approaches to interpret, analyze, and write about works of art. (Art History 301)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Art of Ancient Egypt and the Ancient Near East
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course serves as an introduction to the major artistic and architectural traditions of Ancient Egypt and the Ancient Near East. This course will explore how artifacts and monuments can be used to study the history and culture of the ancient world. It is divided into two units that chronologically focus on the art, architecture, and archaeology of each region. The first unit examines Ancient Egyptian tombs, monuments, and art from the Early Dynastic (c. 3100-2650 BCE) through the Roman (30 BCE- 4thcentury CE) periods. The second unit focuses on Ancient Near Eastern artistic and architectural traditions from the late Neolithic (c. 9500-4500 BCE) through the conquest of the Achaemenid Persian Empire (550-330 BCE) by Alexander the Great. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify major ancient Egyptian and Near Eastern architectural sites, monuments, and works of art; Identify the general characteristics of ancient Egyptian and Near Eastern art and recognize the names and characteristics of the major art historical time periods of each region; Describe how art and architecture can be used to understand the politics, history, and culture of Ancient Egypt and the Near East; Explain ancient Egyptian and Near Eastern cosmology, conceptions of the afterlife, and kingship, as well as their relationship to architectural sites, monuments, and works of art. (Art History 201)

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Art of Ancient Greece and Rome
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

In this course, the student will study the art of Classical Antiquity. The different units of the course reflect the main chronological stages in art development in Ancient Greece and Rome, from the coming together of the Greek city-state and the emergence of ĺÎĺĺĺŤgeometric art (around 900 B.C.) to the fourth century A.D. shift that took place within Roman culture and art due to the growing influence of Christianity. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Explain why ancient Greek and Roman art can be studied together as ĺÎĺĺĺŤthe art of Classical Antiquity; Trace the timeline of major events in Ancient Greece and Rome; Link important developments in the history of Ancient Greece and Rome to specific geographical contexts; Explain how important historical developments and social-historical contexts had an impact on artĺÎĺĺÎĺs evolution in Ancient Greece and Rome; Identify the important stylistic and technical developments of Ancient Greek and Roman art; Discuss important artworks, presenting relevant information on each workĺÎĺĺÎĺs historical context and constitution; Discuss important artists in terms of the style of their work. (Art History 202)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
The Art of Science Advice to Policy Makers: Lessons from the U.S. National Academies
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

In this installment of the Bloomberg Leadership Series, Dr. Fineberg shares the personal experiences and professional insights that have informed his leadership style and his approach to formulating sound and persuasive policy recommendations.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Provider Set:
JHSPH OpenCourseWare
Author:
Harvey Fineberg
Date Added:
04/25/2019
Art of the Islamic World
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course serves as an introduction to the pre-modern Islamic artistic traditions of the Mediterranean, Near East, and Central and South Asia. It surveys core Islamic beliefs, the basic characteristics of Islamic art and architecture, and art and architecture created under each dynasty and ruling party. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: identify the core beliefs of Islam, the major characteristics of Islamic art, and the major forms of Islamic architecture; identify major pre-modern Islamic works of art and monuments from the Middle East, Northern Africa, Spain, and South Asia; explain how the core beliefs of Islam contributed to the basic characteristics of Islamic art and architecture and the secular art works and architecture of the Islamic world; identify the succeeding dynasties that ruled the Islamic world; explain the important role that the patronage of art and architecture had played in definitions of kingship. (Art History 303)

Subject:
Art History
World Cultures
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Arts Integration in Elementary Curriculum, 2nd Edition
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This open textbook was revised in 2018 under a Round Eleven Mini-Grant for Revisions and explores the topic of various fine arts integrations within elementary curricula. Topics include:

Music
Visual Arts
Literary Arts
Performing Arts
Physical Education and Movement

Subject:
Performing Arts
Visual Arts
Education
Material Type:
Lecture
Textbook
Author:
David Brown
Molly Zhou
Date Added:
01/23/2020