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  • U.S. History
Gender and the Law in U.S. History, Spring 2004
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This subject explores the legal history of the United States as a gendered system. It examines how women have shaped the meanings of American citizenship through pursuit of political rights such as suffrage, jury duty, and military service, how those political struggles have varied for across race, religion, and class, as well as how the legal system has shaped gender relations for both women and men through regulation of such issues as marriage, divorce, work, reproduction, and the family. The course readings will draw from primary and secondary materials in American history, as well as some court cases. However, the focus of the class is on the broader relationship between law and society, and no technical legal knowledge is required or assumed.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
General Law
History
Law
Social Science
U.S. History
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Capozzola
Christopher
Date Added:
01/01/2004
History in the Making: A History of the People of the United States of America to 1877
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CC BY-SA
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This textbook examines U.S. History from before European Contact through Reconstruction, while focusing on the people and their history. Prior to its publication, History in the Making underwent a rigorous double blind peer review, a process that involved over thirty scholars who reviewed the materially carefully, objectively, and candidly in order to ensure not only its scholarly integrity but also its high standard of quality. This book provides a strong emphasis on critical thinking about US History by providing several key features in each chapter. Learning Objectives at the beginning of each chapter help students to understand what they will learn in each chapter. Before You Move On sections at the end of each main section are designed to encourage students to reflect on important concepts and test their knowledge as they read. In addition, each chapter includes Critical Thinking Exercises that ask the student to deeply explore chapter content, Key Terms, and a Chronology of events.

Reviews available here: https://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/textbooks/history-in-the-making-a-history-of-the-people-of-the-united-states-of-america-to-1877

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University System of Georgia
Provider Set:
Galileo Open Learning Materials
Author:
Catherine Locks
Marie Lasseter
Pamela Roseman
Sarah Mergel
Tamara Spike
Date Added:
02/20/2019
The History of MIT, Spring 2011
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course examines the history of MIT through the lens of the broader history of science and technology, and vice versa. The course covers the founding of MIT in 1861 and goes through the present, including such topics as William Barton Rogers, educational philosophy, biographies of MIT students and professors, intellectual and organizational development, the role of science, changing laboratories and practices, and MIT's relationship with Boston, the federal government, and industry. Assignments include short papers, presentations, and final paper. A number of classes are concurrent with the MIT150 Symposia.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Education
Higher Education
History
Philosophy
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Mindell, David
Smith, Merritt Roe
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Introduction to Asian American Studies: Literature, Culture, and Historical Experience, Fall 2013
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course provides an overview of Asian American history and its relevance for contemporary issues. It covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the 19th century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during WWII, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of post–1965 Asian immigration. The class examines the role these experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity. The course addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-Asian harassment or violence. The course is taught in English.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Ethnic Studies
History
Literature
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Anonymous
Teng, Emma
Date Added:
01/01/2013
Introduction to United States History: Colonial Period to the Civil War
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CC BY
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This course will introduce the student to United States history from the colonial period to the Civil War. The student will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place in America during this 250-year period. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Analyze the first encounters between the Native inhabitants of North America with Spanish, French, and English colonizers and determine the effect of European colonization on Native Americans; Describe and assess the creation of English/British America; Interpret the main social, political, and economic development of colonies in British North America, including the emergence of a slave economy; Analyze how and why an independent United States was created in 1776 by interpreting the ideological, political, and economic roots of American independence as it developed through the Seven YearsĺÎĺĺÎĺ War, the Imperial Crisis and the American Revolution; Analyze the myriad political and economic crises that plagued the Early American Republic in the 1780s and 1790s and identify and describe the expansion of slavery, partisan politics, economic innovation, westward expansion, and the outbreak of the War of 1812; Interpret the main developments of the Age of Jackson, the Indian Removal Act, the Nullification Crisis, the rise of the Whig Party, the Bank War; Interrogate the definition of 'democracy' in 1820s and 1830s America; Analyze the era of reform in antebellum America and identify and describe the emergence of new religious groups- Shakers, Mormons, evangelicals - as well as moral reformers who sought to curb alcoholism, improve the prison system, increase women's rights, end slavery, or modify the American education system; Analyze antebellum America and the emergence of sectionalism, and identify and describe how Northerners and Southerners apparently opposing viewpoints about labor systems, political economy, and race often obscured many similarities; Analyze the impact of the ideology of Manifest Destiny on the development of the American West as it affected Native Americans and white settlers; Identify and describe the West, the California Gold Rush, the Mexican War, and the contested boundary in the Pacific Northwest; Interpret how the question of slaveryĺÎĺĺÎĺs expansion affected American political parties, law, and created sectional conflict - both political and ideological - between 1820 and the 1850s; Analyze the American Civil War; identify and describe how and why the federal union that was created in 1776 collapsed in 1861; and assess the major facets of the war (including military engagements, the home fronts, Lincoln's presidency, and the question of slavery). (History 211)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
Religious Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
02/20/2019
Islam, the Middle East, and the West, Fall 2006
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Surveys the major political, socio-economic, and cultural changes in the Middle East from the rise of Islam to present times (A.D. 600-2002), with special emphasis on Islam's encounter with the West. Examines the rise and fall of Islamic empires; the place of Arabs, Persian and Turkic peoples, as well as minorities in Islamic society; scientific and technological achievements and their transmission to the West; and the impact of European expansion after 1800. Considers contemporary crises and upheavals facing the Middle East in light of the historical past. This course aims to provide students with a general overview of basic themes and issues in Middle Eastern history from the rise of Islam to the present, with an emphasis on the encounters and exchanges between the "Middle East" (Southwest Asia and North Africa) and the "West" (Europe and the United States).

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
Religious Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Belli, MĚŠriam
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Metropolis: History of New York City, Fall 2009
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Hitherto it had gone by the original Indian name Manna-hatta, or as some still have it, 'The Manhattoes'; but this was now decried as savage and heathenish... At length, when the council was almost in despair, a burgher, remarkable for the size and squareness of his head, proposed that they should call it New-Amsterdam. The proposition took every body by surprise; it was so striking, so apposite, so ingenious. The name was adopted by acclamation, and New-Amsterdam the metropolis was thenceforth called. --Washington Irving, 1808 In less tongue-in-cheek style, this course examines the evolution of New York City from 1607 to the present. The readings focus on the city's social and physical histories, and the class discussions compare New York's development to patterns in other cities.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Wilder, Craig
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Oil: International Evolution
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Have you purchased gasoline and wondered at the price changes? Or worn your polyester jacket and wondered how it kept you warm, or been thankful your phone didn't break when you dropped it? These are just some benefits the petroleum industry brings to our world. Other aspects to the global world market involve natural disasters, wars, rumors of wars, national security, and consumer demand. Learn about oil production and how nations respond as EGEE 120 gives you a foundation of how industry interacts with you, governments, transportation, politics, and the world. You will become a more informed citizen, able to support your opinion about oil and the environment. As John McCain said, \Whoever controls oil controls much more than oil.\"

Subject:
History
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State University
Provider Set:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http:// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Karen Hagemeier Jensen
Yaw Yeboah"
Date Added:
04/25/2019
Oregon’s History: People of the Northwest in the Land of Eden
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CC BY
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This “open textbook” is a social and cultural history of the people of Oregon representing powerful figures from the dominant Euro-American culture, the marginalized and oppressed, and social and political reformers who shaped the historical legacy of the state. It is a story of the diverse array of immigrants who helped build the state and strengthen it. The title is a recollection of the racial fantasies that European-American settlers created in their expansionist vision of the West and the state of Oregon. Initially the Oregon Territory was built on intolerance and racial exclusivity, but eventually Oregon embraces its diversity, but not without struggle and heartache. Our journey through the past starts with an essential question, “Who are the people of Oregon?”

Table of Contents
1. Origins: Indigenous Inhabitants and Landscapes
2. Curiosity, Commerce, Conquest, and Competition: Fur Trade Empires and Discovery
3. Oregon Fever and Western Expansion: Manifest Destiny in the Garden of Eden
4. Native Americans in the Land of Eden: An Elegy of Early Statehood
5. Statehood: Constitutional Exclusions and the Civil War
6. Oregon at the Turn of the Twentieth Century
7. The Dawn of the Civil Rights Movement and the World Wars in Oregon
8. Cold War and Counterculture
9. End of the Twentieth Century and Beyond

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Athanasios Michaels
Date Added:
07/27/2020
Pacific NW History (HIST 214)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

This course teaches critical learning abilities that are skills and attitudes to be taught across the curriculum: communication, problem solving or critical thinking, responsibility, and global awareness or diversity/appreciation. To these, we add information/technology literacy, and lifelong learning. By the end of the course students will be able to: Identify the major political, economic, and social developments in Pacific Northwest history and especially in the state of Washington; Integrate the perspectives of different peoples to interpret Pacific Northwest history; Describe the Pacific Northwestęs role in the context of American and world history; Apply your knowledge of Pacific Northwest history to your life by conducting an oral history and by researching and writing about issues in the region today; and Define current environmental issues in the Pacific Northwest and analyze their historical context.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
04/26/2019
The Places of Migration in United States History, Fall 2006
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Examines the history of the United States as a "nation of immigrants" within a broader global context. Considers migration from the mid-19th century to the present through case studies of such places as New York's Lower East Side, South Texas, Florida, and San Francisco's Chinatown. Examines the role of memory, media, and popular culture in shaping ideas about migration. Includes optional field trip to New York City.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Ethnic Studies
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Capozzola
Christopher
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Public Policy Process
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

The study of public policy offers every citizen an understanding of the various roles played by the different branches of the U.S. federal government as well as by state, county, and local governments in various areas of contemporary American life. It focuses on the priorities of American society as portrayed in the public policy choices that representatives make and the size of different interest groups that advocate on behalf of particular policy goals. This course will introduce this various actors involved in the making of American public policy, explore public policy formulation by examining a variety of case studies, and examine the implementation of public policies, the allocation of funding to pay for these projects, and the evaluation of these projects to determine their effectiveness. The rest of the course will examine specific case studies and areas of public policy. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: demonstrate a working knowledge of various key concepts in the process of American public policymaking and the major steps from start to finish in the public policy process; identify vital issues and specific areas of concern for contemporary American policymakers within the broad fields of economic, national security, public health, environmental, education, rural, and social policy; identify key actors and agencies involved in the making of public policy within the United States and their respective roles in the formulation, implementation, and evaluation of policy; demonstrate skills in the analysis of the various political, social, economic, military, legal, and ethical goals and cultural values that form the basis of policymaking decisions; identify key debates in contemporary American public policy as well as the issues at stake and the arguments advanced by each side of the debate; demonstrate an understanding of various decision frameworks used by policymakers in creating, developing, and executing various public policies; demonstrate an understanding of the context, evolution, and linkages of specific policies and between certain polices within the broader context of American political history. (Political Science 431)

Subject:
History
Political Science
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Case Study
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
02/20/2019
Reading Like a Historian: Louisiana Purchase
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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0.0 stars

The purchase of the Louisiana Territory from France in October 1803 doubled the size of the United States and foreshadowed its emergence as a global power. The purchase marked an unprecedented use of executive power by President Thomas Jefferson and evoked strong resistance from Federalists. In this lesson, a timeline of the purchase along with letters by Federalist leaders help students decide whether practical concerns or political agendas motivated the opposition.

Requires free account.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Stanford History Education Group
Provider Set:
Reading Like a Historian
Date Added:
09/30/2012
Readings in American History Since 1877, Fall 2003
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Aims to develop a teaching knowledge of the field through extensive reading and discussion of major works. The reading covers a broad range of topics -- political, economic, social, and cultural -- and represents a variety of historical methods. Students make frequent oral presentations and prepare a 20-page review essay.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
U.S. History
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jacobs
Meg
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Riots, Strikes, and Conspiracies in American History, Fall 2010
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CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

This course uses readings and discussions to focus on a series of short-term events that shed light on American politics, culture, and social organization. It emphasizes finding ways to make sense of these complicated, highly traumatic events, and on using them to understand larger processes of change in American history. The class also gives students experience with primary documentation research through a term paper assignment.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Fogelson, Robert
Maier, Pauline
Date Added:
01/01/2010
The Show Must Go On! American Theater in the Great Depression
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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The Great Depression had an enormous impact on theatre across the United States. Productions decreased dramatically, audiences shrank, and talented writers, performers, and directors fled the industry to find work in Hollywood. But despite adversity, the show went on. The public construction projects of the Works Progress Administration built new theaters in cities across America. The Federal Theatre Project was established to fund theatre and performances across the country providing work to unemployed artists. This influx of new artists had transformed the industry, opening theatre to new voices, themes, and audiences. This exhibition explores these Depression-era changes and their impact on American theater. This exhibition was created as part of the DPLA’s Digital Curation Program by the following students as part of Professor Anthony Cocciolo's course "Projects in Digital Archives" in the School of Information and Library Science at Pratt Institute: Kathleen Dowling, Laura Marte Piccini, and Matthew Schofield.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Author:
Kathleen Dowling
Laura Marte Piccini
Matthew Schofield
Date Added:
04/01/2013
Solar Resource Assessment and Economics
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Are you interested in Solar Energy? Solar Resource Assessment and Economics explores the methods, economic criteria, and meteorological background for assessing the solar resource with respect to project development of solar energy conversion systems for stakeholders in a given locale. It provides students with an in-depth exploration of the physical qualities of the solar resource, estimation of the fractional contributions of irradiance to total demand, and economic assessment of the solar resource. The course utilizes real data sets and resources to provide students context for the drivers, frameworks, and requirements of solar energy evaluation.

Subject:
Applied Science
Atmospheric Science
Business and Communication
Engineering
Environmental Science
Finance
History
Physical Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State University
Provider Set:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http:// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Jeffrey Brownson
Date Added:
04/25/2019
Technology and Nature in American History, Spring 2008
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Subject considers how the visual and material world of "nature" has been reshaped by industrial practices, beliefs, structures, and activities. Readings in historical geography, aesthetics, American history, environmental and ecological history, architecture, city planning, and landscape studies. Several field trips planned to visit local industrial landscapes. Assignments involve weekly short, written responses to the readings, and discussion-leading. Final project is a photo-essay on the student's choice of industrial site (photographic experience not necessary).

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Pietruska, Jamie
Date Added:
01/01/2008
U.S. History
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

U.S. History covers the breadth of the chronological history of the United States and also provides the necessary depth to ensure the course is manageable for instructors and students alike. U.S. History is designed to meet the scope and sequence requirements of most courses. The authors introduce key forces and major developments that together form the American experience, with particular attention paid to considering issues of race, class, and gender. The text provides a balanced approach to U.S. history, considering the people, events, and ideas that have shaped the United States from both the top down (politics, economics, diplomacy) and bottom up (eyewitness accounts, lived experience).

OpenStax College has compiled many resources for faculty and students, from faculty-only content to interactive homework and study guides.

Table of Contents
The Americas, Europe, and Africa Before 1492
Early Globalization: The Atlantic World, 1492–1650
Creating New Social Orders: Colonial Societies, 1500–1700
Rule Britannia! The English Empire, 1660–1763
Imperial Reforms and Colonial Protests, 1763-1774
America's War for Independence, 1775-1783
Creating Republican Governments, 1776–1790
Growing Pains: The New Republic, 1790–1820
The Industrial, Market, and Transportation Revolutions, 1800–1850
Jacksonian Democracy, 1820–1840
A Nation on the Move: Westward Expansion, 1800–1860
Cotton is King: The Antebellum South, 1800–1860
Antebellum Idealism and Reform Impulses, 1820–1860
Troubled Times: the Tumultuous 1850s
The Civil War, 1860–1865
The Era of Reconstruction, 1865–1877
Go West Young Man! Westward Expansion, 1840-1900
Industrialization and the Rise of Big Business, 1870-1900
The Growing Pains of Urbanization, 1870-1900
Politics in the Gilded Age, 1870-1900
Leading the Way: The Progressive Movement, 1890-1920
Age of Empire: American Foreign Policy, 1890-1914
Americans and the Great War, 1914-1919
The Jazz Age: Redefining the Nation, 1919-1929
Brother, Can You Spare a Dime? The Great Depression, 1929-1932
Franklin Roosevelt and the New Deal, 1932-1941
Fighting the Good Fight in World War II, 1941-1945
Post-War Prosperity and Cold War Fears, 1945-1960
Contesting Futures: America in the 1960s
Political Storms at Home and Abroad, 1968-1980
From Cold War to Culture Wars, 1980-2000
The Challenges of the Twenty-First Century

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
John M. Lund
OpenStax
P. Scott Corbett
Volker Janssen
Date Added:
06/12/2020
U.S. History
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

U.S. History is designed to meet the scope and sequence requirements of most introductory courses. The text provides a balanced approach to U.S. history, considering the people, events, and ideas that have shaped the United States from both the top down (politics, economics, diplomacy) and bottom up (eyewitness accounts, lived experience). U.S. History covers key forces that form the American experience, with particular attention to issues of race, class, and gender.Senior Contributing AuthorsP. Scott Corbett, Ventura CollegeVolker Janssen, California State University, FullertonJohn M. Lund, Keene State CollegeTodd Pfannestiel, Clarion UniversityPaul Vickery, Oral Roberts UniversitySylvie Waskiewicz

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
05/07/2014