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Argumentation and Communication, Fall 2006
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A writing practicum associated with 11.200 and 11.205 that focuses on helping students present their ideas in cogent, persuasive arguments and other analytical frameworks. Reading and writing assignments and other exercises stress the connections between clear thinking, critical reading, and effective writing.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Abbanat, Cherie
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Building Strategy and Performance
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The defining challenge facing business leaders is to develop and drive performance into the future.
For commercial firms, this generally means building profits and growing the value of the business.
Although their focus may be on non-financial outcomes, public services, voluntary groups, and other
not-for-profit organizations share the same central challenge—continually improving their
performance. When the causes of performance through time are not understood, management has
difficulty making the right decisions about important issues. Worse, entire organizations are led into
ill-chosen strategies for their future.
To overcome these problems, leaders need the means to answer three basic questions:
1. Why is business performance following its current path?
2. Where are current policies, decisions, and strategy leading us?
3. How can future prospects be improved?
These questions are the starting point for this book.

Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Performance Through Time
Chapter 2: Resources: Vital Drivers of Performance
Chapter 3: Resources and Bathtub Behavior
Chapter 4: Handling Interdependence Between Resources
Chapter 5: Building and Managing the Strategic Architecture
Chapter 6: You Need Quality Resources as Well as Quantity
Chapter 7: Managing Rivalry for Customers and Other Resources
Chapter 8: Intangible Resources and Capabilities
Chapter 9: Going Forward

Subject:
Business and Communication
Management
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Provider Set:
Saylor Textbooks
Author:
Kim Warren
Date Added:
04/24/2019
Business Analysis Using Financial Statements, Spring 2003
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Uses a case approach to develop a framework for business analysis. Provides students with tools for business analysis, including strategic, accounting, financial, and prospective analysis. Concepts are then applied to a number of decision-making contexts, such as credit analysis, investor communications, merger analysis, financial policy decisions, and securities analysis. From the Course Description: Course Description The purpose of this class is to advance your understanding of how to use financial information to value and analyze firms. We will apply your economics/accounting/finance skills to problems from today's business news to help us understand what is contained in financial reports, why firms report certain information, and how to be a sophisticated user of this information.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Accounting
Finance
Management
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Wysocki, Peter D.
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Chinese Foreign Policy, Fall 2005
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This lecture course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to the international relations of the People's Republic of China. China's foreign relations during the Cold War as well as contemporary diplomatic, security and economic issues will be examined to identify and explain China's foreign policy goals and their implementation since 1949. Throughout, this course will investigate the sources of conflict and cooperation in China's behavior, assessing competing explanations for key events and policies. Readings will be drawn from political science, history, and international relations theory.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Fravel, M
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Contemporary Issues in Education
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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You are welcome to this Module in Contemporary Issues in Education, which is a part of your Professional Studies in education. To understand the content in this Module well, you need to grasp the meaning and major critical areas that constitute the concept of Contemporary Issues in Education. The word contemporary means modern, current, present-day or existing. In this context, Contemporary issues in Education refer to the various events, policies and developments of an educational nature which exist in the modern world.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
African Virtual University
Provider Set:
OER@AVU
Author:
Ssemondo Enosi
Date Added:
03/10/2018
The Economic History of Work and Family, Spring 2005
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Explores the changing map of the public and the private in pre-industrial and modern societies and examines how that map affected men's and women's production and consumption of goods and leisure. The reproductive strategies of women, either in conjunction with or in opposition to their families, is another major theme. How did an ideal of the "domestic" arise in the early modern west, and to what extent did it limit the economic position of women? How has it been challenged, and with what success, in the post-industrial period? Focuses on western Europe since the Middle Ages and on the United States, but some attention to how these issues have played themselves out in non-Western cultures. This course will explore the relation of women and men in both pre-industrial and modern societies to the changing map of public and private (household) work spaces, examining how that map affected their opportunities for both productive activity and the consumption of goods and leisure. The reproductive strategies of women, either in conjunction with or in opposition to their families, will be the third major theme of the course. We will consider how a place and an ideal of the "domestic" arose in the early modern west, to what extent it was effective in limiting the economic position of women, and how it has been challenged, and with what success, in the post-industrial period. Finally, we will consider some of the policy implications for contemporary societies as they respond to changes in the composition of the paid work force, as well as to radical changes in their national demographic profiles. Although most of the material for the course will focus on western Europe since the Middle Ages and on the United States, we will also consider how these issues have played themselves out in non-western cultures.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
McCants, Anne Elizabeth Conger
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Electric Cars: Policy
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Electric cars are more than a novel means of mobility. They have been recognized as an essential building block of the energy transition. Fulfilling their promise will imply a significant change in the technical, digital and social dimensions of transport and energy infrastructure. As the massive adoption of electric mobility will deeply change our society and our individual routines, government intervention is called for. If you are interested in learning about the roles of government in shaping the transition towards electric mobility and renewable energy systems, then this is the course for you.

In this course, you will explore the promise of electric mobility from different public policy perspectives and different levels of government, and learn how they interact. After completing this course, you will be able to assess a policy plan to support the introduction of electric cars and make a motivated choice between alternative policy instruments. In the final week, the course will be concluded by connecting the different track perspectives.

The course includes video lectures, presentations and exercises, which are all illustrated with real-world case studies from projects that were implemented in the Netherlands.

Subject:
Engineering
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Delft University of Technology
Provider Set:
Delft University OpenCourseWare
Author:
prof.dr.ir. Margot Weijnen
prof.dr.ir. Z. Lukszo
Date Added:
04/25/2019
Electricity and Gas: Market Design and Policy Issues
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European gas and electricity markets have largely been liberalized. Due to the specific physical characteristics and public interest aspects of electricity and gas, and to the fact that the networks continue to be natural monopolies, these markets require careful design. In this class, it is analyzed what the market design variables are and how the ongoing process of market design depends on policy goals, starting conditions and physical, technical and institutional constraints. In addition, a number of current policy issues will be discussed, such as security of supply, the CO2 emissions market, the integration of European energy markets and privatization. Participation in a simulation game, in which long-term market dynamics are simulated, is mandatory.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Provider:
Delft University of Technology
Provider Set:
Delft University OpenCourseWare
Author:
Dr.ir. L.J. de Vries
Date Added:
02/12/2016
Energy Economics, Spring 2007
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course explores the theoretical and empirical perspectives on individual and industrial demand for energy, energy supply, energy markets, and public policies affecting energy markets. It discusses aspects of the oil, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear power sectors and examines energy tax, price regulation, deregulation, energy efficiency and policies for controlling emission.

Subject:
Management
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Joskow, Paul
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Environmental Policy and Economics, Spring 2011
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course explores the proper role of government in the regulation of the environment. It will help students develop the tools to estimate the costs and benefits of environmental regulations. These tools will be used to evaluate a series of current policy questions, including: Should air and water pollution regulations be tightened or loosened? What are the costs of climate change in the U.S. and abroad? Is there a "Race to the Bottom" in environmental regulation? What is "sustainable development"? How do environmental problems differ in developing countries? Are we running out of oil and other natural resources? Should we be more energy efficient? To gain real world experience, the course is scheduled to include a visit to the MIT cogeneration plant. We will also do an in-class simulation of an air pollution emissions market.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Allcott, Hunt
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Ethical Dimensions of Renewable Energy and Sustainability Systems
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This course presents an examination of ethical issues relevant to systems-based research procedures, professional conduct, social and environmental impacts, and embedded ethics in research and professional practice in RESS based jobs. In this course, you will consider case studies of ethical issues that can arise when engaging renewable energy and sustainability systems. You will also develop an ethics case study based on your area of RESS interests. The goals of the course are to provide you with tools for analyzing ethical issues both in the line of professional duties and in consideration of the various ethical issues that face an entire sector of renewable energy and that underpin the very reasons for taking a sustainable and renewable approach.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State University
Provider Set:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http:// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Erich Schienke
Date Added:
04/25/2019
Finance Theory II, Spring 2003
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Continuation of Finance Theory I, concentrating on corporate financial management. Topics: Capital investment decisions, security issues, dividend policy, optimal capital structure, hedging and risk management, futures markets and real options analysis. The objective of this course is to learn the financial tools needed to make good business decisions. The course presents the basic insights of corporate finance theory, but emphasizes the application of theory to real business decisions. Each session involves class discussion, some centered on lectures and others around business cases.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Finance
Management
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jenter, Dirk
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Foundations of Development Policy, Spring 2009
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" This course explores the foundations of policy making in developing countries. The goal is to spell out various policy options and to quantify the trade-offs between them. We will study the different facets of human development: education, health, gender, the family, land relations, risk, informal and formal norms and institutions. This is an empirical class. For each topic, we will study several concrete examples chosen from around the world. While studying each of these topics, we will ask: What determines the decisions of poor households in developing countries? What constraints are they subject to? Is there a scope for policy (by government, international organizations, or non-governmental organizations (NGOs))? What policies have been tried out? Have they been successful?"

Subject:
Business and Communication
Economics
Political Science
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Duflo, Esther
Date Added:
01/01/2009
Frameworks of Urban Governance, January (IAP) 2007
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Urban governance comprises the various forces, institutions, and movements that guide economic and physical development, the distribution of resources, social interactions, and other aspects of daily life in urban areas. This course examines governance from legal, political, social, and economic perspectives. In addition, we will discuss how these structures constrain collective decision making about particular urban issues (immigration, education‰Ű_). Assignments will be nightly readings and a short paper relating an urban issue to the frameworks outlined in the class.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kobes, Deborah
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Gaoming Studio - China, Spring 2005
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The studio will focus on the district of Gaoming, located in the northwest of the Pearl River Delta (PRD) - the fastest growing and most productive region of China. The District has recently completed a planning effort in which several design institutes and a Hong Kong planning firm prepared ideas for a new central area near the river. The class will complement these efforts by focusing on planning and design options on the waterfront of the proposed new district and ways of integrating water/hydrological factors into all aspects and land uses of a modern city (residential, commercial, industrial) - including watershed and natural ecosystem protection, economic and recreational activities, transportation, and tourism.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Ecology
Hydrology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Lee, Tunney
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Global Energy Enterprise
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Have you seen a Clean Coal baseball cap? In the challenge to meet soaring energy demand with limited resources, volatile issues like those related to the environment, national security and public health are often addressed outside of normal market transactions and are called externalities, or nonmarket factors. Stakeholders can act in resourceful ways to create a nonmarket environment that best serves their interest. A firm may challenge a law that makes it expensive or difficult to do business or compete with others, for example. An individual may organize a boycott of products or services that violate the individual's interests or principles--hey, don't buy from them! Nonmarket strategy in the energy sector is the subject of this engaging course.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State University
Provider Set:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http:// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Vera Cole
Date Added:
04/25/2019
Good practices for university open-access policies
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This is a guide to good practices for college and university open-access (OA) policies. It's based on the type of rights-retention OA policy first adopted at Harvard, Stanford, MIT, and the University of Kansas. Policies of this kind have since been adopted at a wide variety of institutions in North America, Europe, Africa, and Asia, for example, at public and private institutions, large and small institutions, affluent and indigent institutions, research universities and liberal arts colleges, and at whole universities, schools within universities, and departments within schools.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Harvard University
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Great Power Military Intervention, Fall 2013
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This course examines systematically, and comparatively, great and middle power military interventions, and candidate military interventions, into civil wars from the 1990s to the present. These civil wars did not easily fit into the traditional category of vital interest. These interventions may therefore tell us something about broad trends in international politics including the nature of unipolarity, the erosion of sovereignty, the security implications of globalization, and the nature of modern western military power.

Subject:
Journalism
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Peterson, Roger
Posen, Barry
Date Added:
01/01/2013
The Growth and Spatial Structure of Cities, Fall 2005
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This course examines the economic, political, social, and spatial dynamics of urban growth and decline in cities and their key component areas (downtown, suburbs, etc.). Topics include impacts of industrialization, technology, politics, and social practices on cities. Students will examine the role of public and private sector activities, ranging from zoning and subsidies to infrastructure development and real estate investment, in affecting urban growth and decline. Readings are both theoretical and empirical, with considerable thought paid to comparative and historical differences.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Davis, Diane E.
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Human Dimensions of Global Warming
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CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

GEOG 438W is a writing-intensive course that concentrates on the human-environment interactions involved in contemporary and future global warming. The course comprises two broad topical areas: global warming impacts, which takes place in the first half of the course, and global warming mitigation and policy, which encompasses the second half of the course. Each week highlights a theme, such as the impacts of climate change on human health or greenhouse gas emissions from transportation, that weaves through the course lecture, reading assignment, class discussion, and writing activity.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Communication
Public Relations
Environmental Studies
History
Composition and Rhetoric
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Physical Geography
Cultural Geography
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State University
Provider Set:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http:// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Brandi Robinson
Brent Yarnal
Date Added:
04/25/2019
Hydrology
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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0.0 stars

This course, is designed to be a descriptive and analytical overview of water organs, availability, location and flow. It will be examined in the light of problems, possibilities and policy and consider historical perspectives.

Subject:
Hydrology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
UMass Boston
Provider Set:
UMass Boston OpenCourseWare
Author:
John Looney
Date Added:
04/25/2019
Information and Communication Technology in Africa, Spring 2006
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This is a discussion-based, interactive seminar on the development of information and communication technology in Sub-Saharan Africa. The students will seek to understand the issues surrounding designing and instituting policy, and explore the possible ways in which they can make an impact on information and communication technology in Africa.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Bobbili, Raja
Shigeru Miyagawa
Date Added:
01/01/2006
International Finance: Theory and Policy
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International Finance Theory and Policy is built on Steve Suranovic’s belief that to understand the international economy, students need to learn how economic models are applied to real world problems. It is true what they say, that ”economists do it with models.“ That’s because economic models provide insights about the world that are simply not obtainable solely by discussion of the issues.

International Finance Theory and Policy develops a unified model of the international macroeconomy. The text provides detailed descriptions of major macroeconomic variables, covers the interest rate parity and purchasing power parity theories of exchange rate determination, takes an exhaustive look at the pros and cons of trade imbalances and presents the well-known AA-DD model to explore the effects of fiscal and monetary policy under both fixed and flexible exchange rates.

The models are developed, not by employing advanced mathematics, but rather by walking students through a detailed description of how a model’s assumptions influence its conclusions. But more importantly, each model and theory is connected to real world policy issues.

The Finance Text has the following unique features: 1). Begins with an historical overview of the international macroeconomy to provide context for the theory. 2). Concludes with a detailed discussion of the pros and cons of fixed and floating exchange rate systems. 3. Provides an extensive look at the issue of trade imbalances. Readers learn techniques to evaluate whether a country's trade deficit (or surplus) is dangerous, beneficial, or benign. 4). Explains how purchasing power parity is used to make cross country income comparisons. 5). Offers clear detailed explanations of the AA-DD model. 6). Applies the AA-DD model to understand the effects of monetary and fiscal policy on GDP, the exchange rate, and the trade balance.

International Finance: Theory and Policy by Steve Suranovic is intended for a one-semester course in International Finance.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Finance
Economics
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Provider Set:
Saylor Textbooks
Author:
Steve Suranovic
Date Added:
01/01/2010
International Trade: Theory and Policy
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CC BY-NC-SA
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International Trade: Theory and Policy is built on Steve Suranovic’s belief that to understand the international economy, students need to learn how economic models are applied to real world problems. It is true what they say, that ”economists do it with models.“ That’s because economic models provide insights about the world that are simply not obtainable solely by discussion of the issues. International Trade: Theory and Policy presents a variety of international trade models including the Ricardian model, the Heckscher-Ohlin model, and the monopolistic competition model. It includes trade policy analysis in both perfectly competitive and imperfectly competitive markets.

The text also addresses current issues such as free trade area formation and administered protection policies. The models are developed, not by employing advanced mathematics, but rather by walking students through a detailed description of how a model’s assumptions influence its conclusions. But more importantly, each model and theory is connected to real world policy issues.

The main purpose of the text is to provide a thorough grounding in the arguments concerning the age-old debate about free trade versus protectionism. This text has the following unique features: The text begins with an historical overview of trade policy issues to provide context for the theory. The text concludes with a detailed economic argument supporting free trade. The welfare analysis in the Ricardian, Heckscher-Ohlin and specific factors models emphasize the redistributive effects of free trade by calculating changes in real incomes. The trade policy chapter provides a comprehensive look at many more trade policies than are found in a printed textbook.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Provider Set:
Saylor Textbooks
Author:
Steve Suranovic
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Introduction to American Politics
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course provides a substantive overview of U.S. politics and an introduction to the discipline of political science. It surveys the institutional foundations of U.S. politics as well as the activities of political elites, organizations, and ordinary citizens. It also explores the application of general political science concepts and analytic frameworks to specific episodes and phenomena in U.S. politics.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Caughey Devin
Prof Devin Caughey
Date Added:
09/04/2019
Introduction to Comparative Politics
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Comparative politics is the systematic study and comparison of the world's political systems. The course begins by discussing the factors and categories of analysis that political scientists and important international institutions like the World Bank, NATO, and the United Nations use regularly; it ends by comparing and contrasting governments from five different regions of the world: the Americas, Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Define the chief characteristics of a nation state; Identify and explain various comparative methodologies used to compare various political systems; Distinguish between unitary, federal, and confederal governmental models; Compare and contrast political cultures in selected countries; Compare and contrast political socialization in selected countries; Describe and explain patterns of representation and participation in selected countries; Compare and contrast the roles and functions of political parties in selected countries; Compare and contrast the role of interest groups in selected countries; Identify and explain governance and policy-making in selected countries; Compare and contrast the role of the executive in selected countries; Compare and contrast the role of the judicial branch in selected countries; Compare and contrast the role of the bureaucracy and the policy process in selected countries; Describe and explain the political economy and development in selected countries; Identify and explain political challenges and changing agendas in selected countries. (Political Science 221)

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Introduction to the American Political Process, Spring 2004
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CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

This class introduces students to innovative as well as classic approaches to studying U.S. government. The writing assignments will help you explore, through a variety of lenses, statis and change in the American political system over the last three decades. In the end each student will have a solid grounding in our national political institutions and processes, sharper reading and writing skills, and insight into approaching politics critically and analytically.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Berinsky, Adam J.
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Learning by Comparison: First World/Third World Cities, Fall 2008
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" The primary purpose of this seminar is to enable students to craft approaches to so-called "First World"/ "Third World" city comparisons that are theoretically sophisticated, methodologically rigorous, contextually grounded, and significantly beneficial. Since there exists very little literature and very few projects which compare "First World" and "Third World" cities in a sophisticated and genuinely useful manner, the seminar is structured around a series of readings, case studies, and discussions to assist students in becoming mindful of the potential and pitfalls of comparative analysis, the types of data, the methods of analysis, and the urban issues or sectors which may benefit the most from such approaches. The course is designed to be interdisciplinary and interactive, and is geared towards masters and doctoral students."

Subject:
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Inam, Aseem
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Legal Aspects of MAS Design
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CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

Runway extension, construction of works in protected areas, subsidizing sustainable projects... they all happen within a design space, limited amongst others by legal rules and requirements. To make optimal use of the design space, you have to know about these rules and requirements. When does a contract have to be tendered out, what rules are then applicable, what can be subsidized and what are the restrictions, how to comply with air quality requirements and can a frog really block a project? What alternative designs can be given in order to avoid legal problems? These and other problems will be addressed in this course.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Provider:
Delft University of Technology
Provider Set:
Delft University OpenCourseWare
Author:
Mr.drs. N. Saanen
Date Added:
02/11/2016
Orientation to Energy and Sustainability Policy
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CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

EMSC 302 provides an orientation of the Energy and Sustainability Policy (ESP) degree program, preparing students for further study in the five program learning outcome areas: energy industry knowledge, global perspective, analytical skills, communication skills, and sustainability ethics. It also provides an introduction to the basic skills necessary to be successful in higher-ed online learning, including communication and library skills.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Communication
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State University
Provider Set:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http:// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Haley Sankey
Date Added:
04/25/2019
Planning Communication, Spring 2007
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CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

This three-week module, centered on a focal case, represents the second part of the Department‰ŰŞs introduction to the challenges of reflection and action in professional planning practice. As such, it builds on the concepts and tools in 11.201 and 11.202 in the Fall semester. Working in teams, students will deliver a 20-minute oral briefing, with an additional 10 minutes for questions and comments, in the last week of the class (as detailed on the assignment and posted course schedule). The teams will brief invited guests (‰ŰĎbriefees‰Ű) taking the roles of decisionmakers. DUSP faculty and fellow students may also be in attendance.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Briggs
Xavier de Souza
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Political Economy of Globalization, Spring 2006
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Analyzes the impact of trade and financial flows and regional integration on the domestic politics of advanced industrial states. Pressures for harmonization and convergence of domestic institutions and practices and the sources of national resistance to these are examined. Cases include European Union and West European states, US, and Japan. This is a graduate seminar for students who already have some familiarity with issues in political economy and/or European politics. The objective is to examine the ways in which changes in the international economy and the regimes that regulate it interact with domestic politics, policy-making, and the institutional structures of the political economy in industrialized democracies.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Berger, Suzanne
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan, Spring 2009
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

" This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: party politics, electoral politics, interest group politics, bureaucratic politics, and policy, which will be broken up into seven additional sections. We will try to understand the ways in which the actors and institutions identified in the first part of the semester affect the policy process across a variety of issues areas."

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Samuels, Richard J.
Date Added:
01/01/2009
Principles of Macroeconomics
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a fundamental understanding of the principles of macroeconomics. Macroeconomists study how a country's economy works and try to determine the best choices to improve the overall wellbeing of a nation. Typical topics include inflation (the overall level of prices), employment, fiscal policy (government taxing and spending), and money and banking (interest rates and lending policies). By studying macroeconomics and understanding the critical ideas and tools used to measure economic data, the student will have a better perspective on the issues and problems discussed in contemporary economics. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Discuss key macroeconomic concerns, including national income accounting, saving and investment, and market forces; Describe the determinants of total output and the ways to measure nominal Gross Domestic Product (GDP) as well as real GDP; Compare and contrast definitions of total employment and unemployment, the three forms of unemployment, and inflation; Explain different ways of computing the general movement in prices, and define the relationship between inflation and unemployment; Explain the model of aggregate demand and aggregate supply; Analyze the government's role in the economy and examine how it uses its fiscal policy and monetary policy to influence macroeconomic variables in order to enable macro and micro economic stability; Describe the mechanics of money supply in detail. They will specifically be able to identify different types of money; explain the money creation process, the money multiplier, and the process of interest rate determination; and discuss the role of the Federal Reserve System and its tools of monetary policy; Identify and analyze major theories of economic growth; Analyze various strategies for developing of less-developed nations; Present the concepts behind international trade. (Economics 102; See also: Business Administration 201)

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Principles of Macroeconomics 2e
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Principles of Macroeconomics 2e covers the scope and sequence of most introductory economics courses. The text includes many current examples, which are handled in a politically equitable way. The outcome is a balanced approach to the theory and application of economics concepts. The second edition has been thoroughly revised to increase clarity, update data and current event impacts, and incorporate the feedback from many reviewers and adopters. Changes made in Principles of Macroeconomics 2e are described in the preface and the transition guide to help instructors transition to the second edition. The first edition of Principles of Macroeconomics by OpenStax is available in web view here.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
06/29/2017
Principles of Macroeconomics 2e, Exchange Rates and International Capital Flows, Exchange Rate Policies
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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By the end of this section, you will be able to:

Differentiate among a floating exchange rate, a soft peg, a hard peg, and a merged currency
Identify the tradeoffs that come with a floating exchange rate, a soft peg, a hard peg, and a merged currency

Subject:
Applied Science
Material Type:
Module
Date Added:
09/20/2018