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Bestsellers: The Memoir, Spring 2010
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What is a "life" when it's written down? How does memory inform the present? Why are memoirs so popular? This course will address these questions and others, considering the relationship between biography, autobiography, and memoir and between personal and social themes. We will closely examine some recent memoirs: Tobias Wolff's This Boy's Life, Barack Obama's Dreams From My Father, Edwidge Danticat's Brother, I'm Dying, Ayaan Hirsi Ali's Infidel, and Alison Bechdel's Fun Home. Students will write two brief papers: a critical essay and an experiment in memoir.As a "Sampling," this class offers 6 units, with a strong emphasis on close reading, group discussion, focused writing, and research and presentation skills.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kelley, Wyn
Date Added:
01/01/2010
British Literature II: Romantic Era to the Twentieth Century and Beyond
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The University of North Georgia Press and Affordable Learning Georgia bring you British Literature II: Romantic Era to the Twentieth Century and Beyond.
Featuring 37 authors and full texts of their works, the selections in this open anthology represent the literature developed within and developing through their respective eras. This completely-open anthology will connect students to the conversation of literature that has captivated readers in the past and still holds us now.
Features:
Contextualizing introductions to the Romantic era; the Victorian era; and the Twentieth Century and beyond.
Over 90 historical images.
In-depth biographies of each author.
Instructional Design features, including Reading and Review Questions.
This textbook is an Open Educational Resource. It can be reused, remixed, and reedited freely without seeking permission.

Reviews available here: https://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/textbooks/british-literature-ii-romantic-era-to-the-twentieth-century-and-beyond

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
University System of Georgia
Provider Set:
Galileo Open Learning Materials
Author:
Bonnie J Robinson
Date Added:
02/20/2019
British Literature I: Middle Ages to the Eighteenth Century and Neoclassicism
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CC BY-SA
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The University of North Georgia Press and Affordable Learning Georgia bring you British Literature I: From the Middle Ages to Neoclassicism and the Eighteenth Century. Featuring over 50 authors and full texts of their works, this anthology follows the shift of monarchic to parliamentarian rule in Britain, and the heroic epic to the more egalitarian novel as genre.

Access also available: https://alg.manifoldapp.org/projects/british-literature-i-anthology

Reviews available here: https://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/textbooks/british-literature-i-anthology-from-the-middle-ages-to-neoclassicism-and-the-eighteenth-century

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Bonnie J
Getty Laura
Laura Getty
Robinson Bonnie J
University Of North Georgia
Date Added:
07/29/2019
British Literature Through History
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This is an OER textbook with historical background on many great works of British literature, from the Anglo-Saxon period through the twentieth century. It contains links to free online versions of the texts, but the actual texts are not included in this book.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
If You Know The Author Of
Know The Author
Date Added:
07/29/2019
Children's Literature Course Materials
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Schneider, Jenifer. (2016). The Inside, Outside, and Upside Downs of Children’s Literature: From Poets and Pop-Ups to Princesses and Porridge. Open Education Resources. https://louis.oercommons.org/courses/the-inside-outside-and-upside-downs-of-children-s-literature-from-poets-and-pop-ups-to-princesses-and-porridge The following links of ancillary materials were adapted to support teacher preparation and children's literature courses for Elementary and Early Childhood Education majors. 

Subject:
Children's Literature
Early Childhood Development
Educational Technology
Elementary Education
Higher Education
Literature
Louisiana History
Poetry
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Data Set
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Roxanne Bourque
Date Added:
01/22/2021
A Christmas Carol
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This version of the classic holiday story has been slightly abridged and lightly adapted for advanced students of English language. The text includes comprehension checks, discussion questions, and collaborative activities.

Table of Contents
I.
Marley's Ghost
Analyze What You Read
Interpret What You Read - Scene 1
Interpret What You Read - Scene 2
Interpret What You Read - Scene 3
II.
The First of the Three Spirits
Analyze What You Read
Connect to What You Read
III.
The Second of the Three Spirits
Analyze What You Read
Compare And Contrast What You Read
IV.
The Last of the Three Spirits
Analyze What You Read
Share What You Read

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
William Shakespeare
Timothy Krause
Date Added:
05/05/2021
Civil War, Spring 2010
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course surveys the social science literature on civil war. Students will study the origins of civil war, discuss variables that affect the duration of civil war, and examine the termination of conflict. This course is highly interdisciplinary and covers a wide variety of cases.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
Literature
Political Science
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Petersen, Roger
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Classical Literature: The Golden Age of Augustan Rome, Fall 2004
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Concentrates on specific periods of Classical Greek and Roman Literature in translation with attention to cultural, political, and social influences. Topics vary from year to year chosen from among fifth-century Athens, the Golden Age of Latin Literature, the Silver Age, and Late Antiquity. Roman Literature of the Golden Age of Augustus Caesar, produced during the transition from Republican to Imperial forms of government, was to have a profound and defining influence on Western European and American societies. These writings ultimately established lasting models of aesthetic refinement, philosophical aspiration, and political ambition that continue to shape modern cultures. This class will be exploring the Golden Age of Latin Literature from an historical perspective in order to provide an intensive examination of the cultural contexts in which these monumental works of classical art were first produced. Readings will emphasize the transition from a Republican form of government to an Empire under the rule of Augustus Caesar and the diversity of responses among individual authors to the profound structural changes that Roman society was undergoing at this time. Particular attention will be devoted to the reorganization of society and the self through textuality, the changing dimensions of the public and the private, the roles of class and gender, and the relationship between art and pleasure. Writings covering a wide variety of literary genres will include the works of Caesar, Cicero, Catullus, Livy, Virgil, Horace, and Ovid, with additional readings from Cassius Dio for background.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Cain, James
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Classics of Chinese Literature, Fall 2011
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course is an introduction to three of the major genres of traditional Chinese literature - poetry, fiction and drama, with a focus on vernacular fiction. We will read translations of a number of the "masterworks" of Chinese literature. We will also examine the intertextuality between these genres - how poetry blends into narrative, how fiction becomes drama, and drama inspires fiction. Through reading these selected works of traditional Chinese literature, we will examine some of the major features of traditional Chinese society: religious and philosophical beliefs, the imperial system and dynastic change, gender relations, notions of class and ethnicity, family, romance and sexuality. All works are read in translation; no language background is necessary.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Emma Teng
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Communicating Across Cultures, Spring 2005
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In an increasingly interconnected world, communicating across cultures is a crucial skill in the international networks of business, science, and technology. Subject examines a range of communication styles and techniques resulting from different cultural norms and traditions. It begins with a general theoretical framework and then moves into case studies. Topics include understanding the relationship between communication and culture, differences in verbal and non-verbal communication styles, barriers to intercultural communication, modes of specific cross-cultural communication activities (e.g. argumentation, negotiation, conflict resolution) and intercultural adjustment. Case studies explore specific ways of communicating in Asian and European cultures. Graduate students are expected to complete additional assignments. Taught in English.It has become commonplace knowledge that globalization is one of the major forces shaping our world. If we look at the spread of information, ideas, capital, media, cultural artifacts--or for that matter, people--we can see the boundaries and borders that have historically separated one country or one group from another are becoming more and more permeable. For proof of this close to home, you need only to look at the composition of the MIT student body: 8 percent of the undergraduates and 37 percent of the graduate students are from 109 different countries. "Communicating Across Cultures" is designed to help you meet the challenges of living in a world in which, increasingly, you will be asked to interact with people who may not be like you in fundamental ways. Its primary goals are to help you become more sensitive to intercultural communication differences, and to provide you with the knowledge and skills that will help you interact successfully with people from cultures other than your own. We hope the course will accomplish those goals by exposing you to some of the best writers and scholars on the subject of intercultural communication, and by giving you a variety of opportunities to practice intercultural communication yourself. As you read the syllabus for this course, we hope you get a sense of our commitment to making this course a rewarding experience for you.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Bernd Breslow
Lori
Widdig
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Compact Anthology of World Literature
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The introductions in this anthology are meant to be just that: a basic overview of what students need to know before they begin reading, with topics that students can research further. An open access literature textbook cannot be a history book at the same time, but history is the great companion of literature: The more history students know, the easier it is for them to interpret literature.

Reviews available: https://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/textbooks/compact-anthology-of-world-literature
Link to request instructor resources: https://alg.manifoldapp.org/projects/compact-anthology-of-world-literature

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University System of Georgia
Provider Set:
Galileo Open Learning Materials
Author:
Kyounghye Kwon
Laura Getty
Date Added:
09/23/2015
Compact Anthology of World Literature II: Volumes 4, 5, and 6
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Although the text is designed to look like an actual book, the Table of Contents is composed of hyperlinks that will take you to each introductory section and then to each text. The three parts of the text are organized into the following units:

Part 4—The Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries

Unit I: The Age of Reason

Unit II: The Near East and Asia

Part 5—The Long Nineteenth Century

Unit I Romanticism

Unit II Realism

Part 6—The Twentieth Century and Contemporary Literature

Unit I Modernism

Unit II Postcolonial Literature

Unit III Contemporary Literature

Texts from a variety of genres and cultures are included in each unit. Additionally, each selection or collection includes a brief introduction about the author and text(s), and each includes 3 – 5 discussion questions. Texts in the public domain--those published or translated before 1923--are replicated here. Texts published or translated after 1923 are not yet available in the public domain. In those cases, we have provided a link to a stable site that includes the text. Thus, in Part 6, most of the texts are accessible in the form of links to outside sites. In every case, we have attempted to connect to the most stable links available.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Anita Turlington
Karen Dodson
Laura Getty
Laura Ng
Matthew Horton
Date Added:
07/29/2019
Contemporary Literature: British Novels Now, Spring 2007
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Subject focuses on fiction, drama, and poetry and possibly films inspired by these topics mostly of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. What is Britain now? Its metropolises are increasingly multicultural. Its hold over its distant colonies is a thing of the past. Its sway within the global political arena is weak. Its command over Northern Ireland, Wales, and Scotland is broken or threatened. What have novelists made of all this? What are they writing as the old empire fades away and as new social and political formations emerge? These are the questions that will concern us in this course.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Brouillette, Sarah
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Contemporary Literature: Literature, Development, and Human Rights, Spring 2008
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Subject focuses on fiction, drama, and poetry and possibly films inspired by these topics mostly of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Brouillette, Sarah
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Contemporary Literature, Spring 2003
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Subject focuses on fiction, drama, and poetry and possibly films inspired by these topics mostly of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. This semester, Contemporary Literature (21L.488) deals with Irish literature, a subject broad and deep. To achieve a manageable volume of study, the course focuses primarily on poetry and prose, at drama's expense, and on living writers, at the expense of their predecessors. Each class session follows a discussion format, often with students assigned to lead-off or summarize the day's topic.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Hildebidle, John
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Contemporary Literature: Street Haunting in the Global City, Spring 2018
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In this class we will focus on the connections between urban exploration and reading, attending to such shared concerns as pacing, legibility, transgression, attention and distraction, tracing and retracing, and memory. This idea of re-reading cities will be both a theme centering our discussions and a guiding principle of the course design, as we continuously loop back, returning to haunt texts we left behind earlier in the semester.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Anna Jones Abramson
Date Added:
04/25/2019
Creating Literary Analysis
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Chapter 1: Introduction: What Is Literary Theory and Why Should I Care?
Chapter 2: Writing about Form: Developing the Foundations of Close Reading
Chapter 3: Writing about Character and Motivation: Psychoanalytic Literary Criticism
Chapter 4: Writing about Gender and Sexuality: Applying Feminist and Gender Criticism
Chapter 5: Writing about Racial, Ethnic, and Cultural Identity
Chapter 6: Writing about Readers: Applying Reader-Response Theory
Chapter 7: Writing about History and Culture from a New Historical Perspective
Chapter 8: Writing about the Natural World
Chapter 9: Reading and Writing in the Digital Age
Chapter 10: Appendix A: Peer Review Sheets

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
John Pennington
Ryan Cordell
Date Added:
07/31/2020
Cultural and Literary Expression in Modernity
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This course seeks to develop a nuanced understanding of the scope of cultural and literary expression in the late 19th and the first half of the 20th centuries. It attends to broad socio-historical happenings, from the birth of modernism in the late 19th century to the post-modern moment. In addition to literary modernism, the course will also take a brief look at the cultural production of modernism in art, music, architecture, cinema, philosophy, and drama. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: Define the terms modernism and modernity and explain the similarities and differences between these terms using specific works to illustrate comparison and contrast; List and explain the importance of a variety of social, cultural, and historical developments leading up to and occurring during the modern period; Cite and analyze the meaning of primary works of literature, poetry, art, music, architecture, cinema, philosophy and drama to illustrate the principle characteristics of modernism; Compare and contrast the literatures of both France and England from the start of the modern era (i.e., the turn of the twentieth century); Explain the impact of the Great War upon the development and expression of a variety of literary and artistic forms and especially on poetry in a number of genres; Describe the aftermath of World War I and its variety of effects upon literature and art and especially upon the poetry of T.S. Eliot and the novels of Virginia Woolf and Ernest Hemingway; Define High Modernism and give examples of the tenets, ideals, and even the contradictions and self-contradictions of this movement in history and literature (and especially in both its Irish and British contexts); Define the terms postmodernism and deconstruction as well as the phrase Magical Realism and identify the most important characteristics of the movements, fields, theories, and texts associated with these terms; Explain the premises of postcolonial literature and literary theory and identify, describe, compare, and contrast postcolonial texts from range of national origins. (English Literature 204)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Career and Technical Education
Film and Music Production
Literature
World Cultures
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019