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All I Want to Do Is Dance, Dance, Dance!
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CC BY
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Students will observe dance movements depicted in a drawing and a painting. Partners will use simple lines to draw their partner's movements and paint dance costumes on the figures using various brushstrokes. Students will write a persuasive speech to the school superintendent explaining why they believe dance should be a regular part of the curriculum. They will then model dance movements for classmates in teams of four and recite their persuasive speech to the class.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
J. Paul Getty Museum
Provider Set:
Getty Education
Date Added:
11/11/2019
American Art
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

This course surveys art of America from the colonial era through the post-war 20th century. The student will consider broad stylistic tendencies in various regions and periods and examine specific artists and works of art in historical and social contexts, with emphasis on the congruent evolution of contemporary American multi-cultural identity. Overarching issues that have interested major scholars of American art and its purview include the landscape (wilderness, Manifest Destiny, rural settlement, and urban development); the family and gender roles; the founding rhetoric of freedom and antebellum slavery; and notions of artistic modernism through the 20th century. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Understand the historical (geographic, political) formation of the present United States of America; Be familiar with renowned influential American artists from the 18th through the 20th century; Be conversant in common stylistic designations used in Western art of the 17th through 20th centuries; Recognize subjects and forms in American art through history that mark its distinction; Be able to engage specific images, objects, and structures from different critical perspectives to consider their functions and meanings. (Art History 210)

Subject:
Art History
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
American Authors: American Women Authors, Spring 2003
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

Examines in detail the works of several American authors. Through close readings of poetry, novels, or plays, subject addresses such issues as literary influence, cultural diversity, and the writer's career. Topic: American Women Authors. This subject, crosslisted in Literature and Women's Studies, examines a range of American women authors from the seventeenth century to the present. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles- the captivity narrative, slave novel, sensational, sentimental, realistic, and postmodern fiction- and also to address significant historical events in American women's history: Puritanism, the American Revolution, industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the 60s civil rights movements. A primary focus will be themes studied and understood through the lens of gender: war, violence, and sexual exploitation (Keller, Rowlandson, Rowson); the relationship between women and religion (Rowlandson, Rowson, Stowe); labor, poverty, and working conditions for women (Fern, Davis, Wharton); captivity and slavery (Rowlandson, Jacobs); class struggle (Fern, Davis, Wharton, Larsen); race and identity (Keller, Jacobs, Larsen, Morrison); feminist revisions of history (Stowe, Morrison, Keller); and the myth of the fallen woman (take your pick). Essays and inclass reports will focus more particularly on specific writers and themes and will stress the skills of close reading, annotation, research, and uses of multimedia where appropriate. A classroom electronic archive has been developed for this course and will be available as a resource for images and other media materials.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Social Science
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kelley
Wyn
Date Added:
01/01/2003
American Classics, Spring 2006
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

An examination of "classic" documents in American history from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, including writings by authors such as John Winthrop, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison; Frederick Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, and Abraham Lincoln; Horatio Alger, Jacob Riis and Thorstein Veblen; Franklin D. Roosevelt, Betty Friedan, Bob Dylan, and Martin Luther King, Jr. Music, taped speeches, television programs, motion pictures, and/or other visual materials may also be included. Class meetings consist primarily of discussions and there is one required museum trip.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Maier, Pauline
Date Added:
01/01/2006
American Consumer Culture, Fall 2007
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

This class examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the ‰ŰĎgood life‰Ű through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. We will explore how such things as department stores, nationally advertised brand-name goods, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society, and politics. The course is organized both thematically and chronologically. Each period deals with a new development in the history of consumer culture. Throughout we explore both celebrations and critiques of mass consumption and abundance.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Economics
History
Marketing
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jacobs, Meg
Date Added:
01/01/2007
American Dream: Using Storytelling to Explore Social Class in the United States, Spring 2018
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This course explores the experiences and understandings of class among Americans positioned at different points along the U.S. social spectrum. It considers a variety of classic frameworks for analyzing social class and uses memoirs, novels, and ethnographies to gain a sense of how class is experienced in daily life and how it intersects with other forms of social difference such as race and gender.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Christine Walley
Date Added:
01/01/2018
American Literature I
Read the Fine Print
Some Rights Reserved
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0.0 stars

This course is a survey of American Literature from 1650 through 1820. It covers Early American and Puritan Literature, Enlightenment Literature, and Romantic Literature. It teaches in the context of American History and introduces the student to literary criticism and research.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
Lumen Learning
Provider Set:
Candela Courseware
Date Added:
04/25/2019
American Literature I (ENGL 246)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

In this class we will practice skills in reading, analyzing, and writing about fiction, poetry and drama from a select sampling of 20th Century American Literature. Through class discussion, close reading, and extensive writing practice, this course seeks to develop critical and analytical skills, preparing students for more advanced academic work.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
04/26/2019
American Literature, Spring 2013
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This course studies the national literature of the United States since the early 19th century. It considers a range of texts - including, novels, essays, and poetry - and their efforts to define the notion of American identity. Readings usually include works by such authors as Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Emily Dickinson, and Toni Morrison.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kelley, Wyn
Date Added:
01/01/2013
The American Novel, Fall 2006
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This course explores the metaphorical, historical, social, and psychological value of ghosts in the American novel. Using the theme of "haunting" as a flashpoint for class discussion and a thematic center for our readerly attention, this course examines the American novel in the context of the various histories which might be said to haunt fictional characters in the American novel, to haunt the American novel itself, and ultimately to haunt us: America's colonial past, its slave past, and other memorable and painful chapters in its past.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Alexandre, Sandy
Date Added:
01/01/2006
The American Novel: Stranger and Stranger, Spring 2013
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

This course covers works by major American novelists, beginning with the late 18th century and concluding with a contemporary novelist. The class places major emphasis on reading novels as literary texts, but attention is paid to historical, intellectual, and political contexts as well. The syllabus varies from term to term, but many of the following writers are represented: Rowson, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Wharton, James, and Toni Morrison. Previously taught topics include The American Revolution and Makeovers (i.e. adaptations and reinterpretation of novels traditionally considered as American "Classics"). May be repeated for credit with instructor's permission so long as the content differs.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Wyn Kelley
Date Added:
01/01/2013
The American Renaissance
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

The ĺÎĺ_ĺĚĄ_American Renaissance,ĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺÎĺ a period of tremendous literary activity that took place in America between the 1830s and 1860s represents the cultivation of a distinctively American literature. The student will begin this course by looking at what it was in American culture and society that led to the dramatic outburst of literary creativity in this era. The student will then explore some of the periodĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s most famous works, attempting to define the emerging American identity represented in this literature. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: discriminate among the key economic, technological, social, and cultural transformations underpinning the American Renaissance; define the transformations in American Protestantism exemplified by the second Great Awakening and transcendentalism; list the key tenets of transcendentalism and relate them to romanticism more broadly and to social and cultural developments in the antebellum United States; analyze EmersonĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s place in defining transcendentalism and his key differences from other transcendentalists; analyze competing conceptualizations of poetry and its construction and purpose, with particular attention to Poe, Emerson, and Whitman; define the formal innovations of Dickinson and their relationship to her central themes; describe the emergence of the short story as a form, with reference to specific stories by Hawthorne and Poe; distinguish among forms of the novel, with reference to specific works by Hawthorne, Thompson, and Fern; analyze the ways that writers such as Melville, Brownson, Davis, and Thoreau saw industrialization and capitalism as a threat to U. S. society; develop the relationship between ThoreauĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s interest in nature and his political commitments and compare and contrast his thinking with Emerson and other transcendentalists; analyze the different ways that sentimentalism constrained and empowered women writers to critique gender conventions, with reference to specific works by writers such as Fern, Alcott, and Stowe; define the ways that the slavery question influenced major texts and major controversies over literature during this period. This free course may be completed online at any time. (English Literature 405)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
American Sign Language I (ASL 121)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

ASL I is an introduction to the naturally existing language widely used by Deaf people in North America. Since ASL is a visual-gestural language, students will need to develop unique communication skills. These consist of using the hands, body, face, eyes and space. In order to achieve progress in this class, it is important to become comfortable communicating with your whole body and listening with your eyes.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
04/26/2019
American Sign Language II (ASL 122)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

ASL II is a sequential course following ASL I, which continues to build knowledge of the naturally existing language widely used by Deaf people in North America. Since ASL is a visual-gestural language, students will need to continue to develop unique communication skills. These consist of using the hands, body, face, eyes and space. In order to achieve progress in this class, it is important to become comfortable communicating with your whole body and listening with your eyes.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
04/26/2019
American Sign Language III (ASL 123)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

ASL III is the third quarter of the first year study of American Sign Language (ASL) and the people who use it. ASL III will enhance the use of ASL grammar and consist of concentrated efforts to develop the studentęs expressive and receptive skills. The course will continue to provide insights into Deaf Cultural values, attitudes and the Deaf community. Now learning more abstract concepts of the language, ASL III students will be able to: narrate events that occurred in the past, ask for solutions to everyday problems, tell about life events, and describe objects. Students will also be able to: demonstrate intermediate finger spelling competency, generate complex ASL structures with intermediate vocabulary knowledge, execute a wide variety of grammatical principles, including classifiers and inflections, adapt to different sign language registers, dialects and accents, and create opportunities to interact with members of the Deaf community.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
World Cultures
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
04/26/2019
American Women's Literature, 1847 to 1922
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

LibriVox recording of a collection of 20 short stories and long-form poetry by American women writers. (Summary by BellonaTimes)

Includes selections from Mary E. Wilkins, Kate Chopin, Louisa May Alcott, Alice Dunbar, Willa Cather, Lola Ridge, Mary Eleanor Wilkins Freeman, Fannie Hurst, Zitkala-Sa, Amy Lowell, Hilda Doolittle, Elinor Wylie, Lucretia P. Hale, Edna Ferber, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Lydia Maria Child, Sara Teasdale, Susan Fenimore Cooper, and Elizabeth Stuart Phelps.

For further information, including links to online text, reader information, RSS feeds, CD cover or other formats (if available), please go to the LibriVox catalog page for this recording.

For more free audio books or to become a volunteer reader, visit LibriVox.org.

Download M4B (168MB)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Alice Dunbar
Amy Lowell
Charlotte Perkins Gilman
Edna Ferber
Elinor Wylie
Fannie Hurst
Harriet Beecher Stowe
Hilda Doolittle
Kate Chopin
Lola Ridge
Louisa May Alcott
Lucretia P. Hale
Lydia Maria Child
Mary E. Wilkins
Mary Eleanor Wilkins Freeman
Sara Teasdale
Susan Fenimore Cooper
Willa Cather
Zitkala-Sa
and Elizabeth Stuart Phelps
Date Added:
07/29/2019
The Ancient City, Spring 2005
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This course focuses on the archaeology of the Greek and Roman city. It investigates the relationship between urban architecture and the political, social, and economic role of cities in the Greek and Roman world. Analyzes a range of archaeological and literary evidence relevant to the use of space in Greek and Roman cities (e.g. Athens, Paestum, Rome, Pompeii) and a range of theoretical frameworks for the study of ancient urbanism.

Subject:
Applied Science
Archaeology
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Broadhead, William
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Ancient Greek I: A 21st Century Approach
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

In this elementary textbook, Philip S. Peek draws on his twenty-five years of teaching experience to present the ancient Greek language in an imaginative and accessible way that promotes creativity, deep learning, and diversity. The course is built on three pillars: memory, analysis, and logic. Readers memorize the top 250 most frequently occurring ancient Greek words, the essential word endings, the eight parts of speech, and the grammatical concepts they will most frequently encounter when reading authentic ancient texts. Analysis and logic exercises enable the translation and parsing of genuine ancient Greek sentences, with compelling reading selections in English and in Greek offering starting points for contemplation, debate, and reflection. A series of embedded Learning Tips help teachers and students to think in practical and imaginative ways about how they learn. This combination of memory-based learning and concept- and skill-based learning gradually builds the confidence of the reader, teaching them how to learn by guiding them from a familiarity with the basics to proficiency in reading this beautiful language. Ancient Greek I: A 21st-Century Approach is written for high-school and university students, but is an instructive and rewarding text for anyone who wishes to learn ancient Greek.

Table of Contents
Module 1 The Greek Alphabet
Module 2 More Sounds and Punctuation
Module 3 Accents and Accenting Verbs I
Module 4 Adverbs
Module 5 Conjunctions and Accenting Verbs II
Module 6 Endings Create Meaning
Guest Feature 1 Stefan Hagel Teaches Us How to Sing
Module 7 Nouns, Pronouns, and their Case Functions
Module 8 Prepositions and Prefixes
Module 9 The Verb and μι-Verbs εἰμί, δίδωμι, τίθημι
Module 10 The Verbs ἔχω, ποιέω, ἔρχομαι, φημί
Module 11 The Definite Article and Persistent Accent
Module 12 Substantive Adjectives and the Article
Module 13 Third Declension Nouns
Guest Feature 2 Tom Holland on the Art of Translating Herodotos
Module 14 First Declension Nouns in –η and -ᾱ and τίς, τί; τις, τι; ὅστις, ἥτις, ὅτι
Module 15 Attributive and Predicate Position
Module 16 Second Declension Nouns
Module 17 The Future Indicative and Infinitive Active of ἔχω, ἐλαύνω, ἔρχομαι and the Dynamic Infinitive
Module 18 The Personal Pronouns; εἷς, οὐδείς, and μηδείς; the Dative and Accusative of Respect; Time Expressions
Module 19 οἶδα and the Present and Future Indicative and Infinitive Middle and Passive of ἐλαύνω, καλέω, φέρω, δίδωμι, τίθημι
Guest Feature 3 Joe Goodkin, Singer and Songwriter
Module 20 First and Second Declension Adjectives and Common Adjectives and Pronouns: αὐτός, οὗτος, ὅδε, ἐκεῖνος, and -ων, -ουσα, -ον
Module 21 First Declension Short Alpha Nouns
Module 22 The Relative Pronoun
Module 23 The Imperfect and Aorist Indicative of λέγω, ἔχω, ἐργάζομαι, δίδωμι, τίθημι
Module 24 Contract Verbs
Module 25 The Infinitive in Indirect Statement and πρίν- and ὥστε-Clauses
Guest Feature 4 Amy R. Cohen on Performing and Translating Ancient Greek Drama
Module 26 Additional Common Adjectives: πᾶς, μέγας, πολύς, ἡδύς, ἀληθής, and -ᾱς, -ᾱσα, -αν
Module 27 Comparative and Superlative Adjectives and Adverbs; Dative of Degree of Difference
Module 28 εἰμί and εἶμι
Module 29 δείκνυμι and φημί
Guest Feature 5 Diane Rayor on Translating Sappho and Euripides
Module 30 ἵημι and ἵστημι

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Bowling Green State University
Philip S. Peek
Date Added:
11/24/2021
Ancient Philosophy, Fall 2004
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This course will acquaint the student with some of the ancient Greek contributions to the Western philosophical and scientific tradition. We will examine a broad range of central philosophical themes concerning: nature, law, justice, knowledge, virtue, happiness, and death. There will be a strong emphasis on analyses of arguments found in the texts.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
General Law
Law
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Haslanger, Sally
Date Added:
01/01/2004
The Ancient World: Greece, Fall 2004
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

History of Ancient Greece from the Bronze Age to the death of Alexander. Major social, economic, political, and religious trends. Homer, heroism, and the Greek identity; the hoplite revolution and the rise of the city-state; Herodotus, Persia, and the (re)birth of history; Empire, Thucydidean rationalism, and the Peloponnesian War; Platonic constructs; Aristotle, Macedonia, and Hellenism. Emphasis on use of primary sources in translation.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Broadhead, William
Date Added:
01/01/2004