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American History

Survey of United States history from earliest times to the Civil War era, and from the Civil War era to the present.

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American History I
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Table of Contents:

Module 1: New World Encounters
Module 2: New World Experiments
Module 3: Putting Down Roots
Module 4: Experience of Empire
Module 5: The American Revolution
Module 6: The Republican Experiment
Module 7: Democracy & Dissent
Module 8: Republican Ascendancy
Module 9: Nation Building & Nationalism
Module 10: The Age of "Jacksonian Democracy"
Module 11: Southern Society Before the Civil War
Module 12: Northern Society Before the Civil War
Module 13: An Age of Expansionism
Module 14: Sectional Crisis
Module 15: Secession & Civil War
Appendices

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Lumen Learning
Date Added:
04/12/2021
American History I: Colonial Period to Civil War
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CC BY
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This text from Dr. Franklin Williamson and Dr. Tom Aiello from Gordon State University contains all modular text content used in the LMS implementation of their American History I (HIST 2111) courses. American History 1 covers topics ranging from the colonial period to the Civil War.

The text was created under an Affordable Learning Georgia G2C Pilot Grant, taking place from Spring 2018 until Fall 2019.

Table of Contents:

Chapter 1 - The Colonial South
Chapter 2 - The Colonial North
Chapter 3 - 18th Century Colonial Life
Chapter 4 - The French and Indian War
Chapter 5 - American Revolution, Part 1
Chapter 6 - American Revolution, Part 2
Chapter 7 - Articles of Confederation
Chapter 8 - Early Republic
Chapter 9 - Jeffersonian Era
Chapter 10 - Market Revolution
Chapter 11 - The North and 19th Century Thought
Chapter 12 - Slavery and Southern Life
Chapter 13 - Western Expansion
Chapter 14 - Sectional Conflict
Chapter 15 - American Civil War

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
J. Franklin Williamson
Thomas Aiello
Date Added:
01/23/2020
American History I: Colonial Period to Civil War
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This text from Dr. Franklin Williamson and Dr. Tom Aiello from Gordon State University contains all modular text content used in the LMS implementation of their American History I (HIST 2111) courses. American History 1 covers topics ranging from the colonial period to the Civil War.

The text was created under an Affordable Learning Georgia G2C Pilot Grant, taking place from Spring 2018 until Fall 2019. Topics include:

The Colonial South / The Colonial North
18th Century Colonial Life
American Revolution
Jeffersonian Era
Slavery and Southern Life
Western Expansion
Sectional Conflict
American Civil War

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Gordon State College
Thomas Aiello
J Franklin Williamson
Date Added:
01/27/2021
American History to 1865, Fall 2010
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This course provides a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. It examines the colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact. Readings include writings of the period by J. Winthrop, T. Paine, T. Jefferson, J. Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and A. Lincoln.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Maier, Pauline
Date Added:
01/01/2010
American Urban History I, Spring 2010
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course is a seminar on the history of institutions and institutional change in American cities from roughly 1850 to the present. Among the institutions to be looked at are political machines, police departments, courts, schools, prisons, public authorities, and universities. The focus of the course is on readings and discussions.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Fogelson, Robert
Date Added:
01/01/2009
The American Yawp: A Massively Collaborative Open U.S. History Textbook
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CC BY-SA
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The American Yawp is a free, online, collaboratively built American history textbook. Over 300 historians joined together to create the book they wanted for their own students—an accessible, synthetic narrative that reflects the best of recent historical scholarship and provides a jumping-off point for discussions in the U.S. history classroom and beyond.

Long before Whitman and long after, Americans have sung something collectively amid the deafening roar of their many individual voices. The Yawp highlights the dynamism and conflict inherent in the history of the United States, while also looking for the common threads that help us make sense of the past. Without losing sight of politics and power, The American Yawp incorporates transnational perspectives, integrates diverse voices, recovers narratives of resistance, and explores the complex process of cultural creation. It looks for America in crowded slave cabins, bustling markets, congested tenements, and marbled halls. It navigates between maternity wards, prisons, streets, bars, and boardrooms.

The fully peer-reviewed edition of The American Yawp will be available in two print volumes designed for the U.S. history survey.

Volume I begins with the indigenous people who called the Americas home before chronicling the collision of Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans.The American Yawptraces the development of colonial society in the context of the larger Atlantic World and investigates the origins and ruptures of slavery, the American Revolution, and the new nation's development and rebirth through the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Volume II opens in the Gilded Age, before moving through the twentieth century as the country reckoned with economic crises, world wars, and social, cultural, and political upheaval at home. Bringing the narrative up to the present,The American Yawp enables students to ask their own questions about how the past informs the problems and opportunities we confront today.

VOLUME I: BEFORE 1877
The New World
Colliding Cultures
British North America
Colonial Society
The American Revolution
A New Nation
The Early Republic
The Market Revolution
Democracy in America
Religion and Reform
The Cotton Revolution
Manifest Destiny
The Sectional Crisis
The Civil War
Reconstruction

VOLUME II: AFTER 1877
Capital and Labor
Conquering the West
Life in Industrial America
American Empire
The Progressive Era
World War I & Its Aftermath
The New Era
The Great Depression
World War II
The Cold War
The Affluent Society
The Sixties
The Unraveling
The Triumph of the Right
The Recent Past

Subject:
American Literature
History
Literature and Composition
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Ben Wright
Joseph Locke
Date Added:
10/04/2019
The American Yawp Volume. II: Since 1877
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
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In an increasingly digital world in which pedagogical trends are de-emphasizing rote learning and professors are increasingly turning toward active-learning exercises, scholars are fleeing traditional textbooks. Yet for those that still yearn for the safe tether of a synthetic text, as either narrative backbone or occasional reference material, The American Yawp offers a free and online, collaboratively built, open American history textbook designed for college-level history courses. Unchecked by profit motives or business models, and free from for-profit educational organizations, The American Yawp is by scholars, for scholars. All contributors—experienced college-level instructors—volunteer their expertise to help democratize the American past for twenty-first century classrooms.

Table of Contents
16.Capital and Labor
17.Conquering the West
18.Life in Industrial America
19.American Empire
20.The Progressive Era
21.World War I and Its Aftermath
22.The New Era
23.The Great Depression
24.World War II
25.The Cold War
26.The Affluent Society
27.The Sixties
28.The Unraveling
29.The Triumph of the Right
30.The Recent Past

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Ben Wright
Joseph L. Locke
Date Added:
06/11/2020
The American Yawp Volume I: To 1877
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

In an increasingly digital world in which pedagogical trends are de-emphasizing rote learning and professors are increasingly turning toward active-learning exercises, scholars are fleeing traditional textbooks. Yet for those that still yearn for the safe tether of a synthetic text, as either narrative backbone or occasional reference material, The American Yawp offers a free and online, collaboratively built, open American history textbook designed for college-level history courses. Unchecked by profit motives or business models, and free from for-profit educational organizations, The American Yawp is by scholars, for scholars. All contributors—experienced college-level instructors—volunteer their expertise to help democratize the American past for twenty-first century classrooms.
Table of Contents
1. The New World
2. Colliding Cultures
3. British North America
4. Colonial Society
5. The American Revolution
6. A New Nation
7. The Early Republic
8. The Market Revolution
9. Democracy in America
10. Religion and Reform
11. The Cotton Revolution
12. Manifest Destiny
13. The Sectional Crisis
14. The Civil War
15. Reconstruction

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Ben Wright
Joseph L. Locke
Date Added:
06/11/2020
Bay College - HIST 211 - U.S. History to 1865
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CC BY
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Online OER text created for U.S. History to 1865 by Dr. June Klees for Bay College.

© 2017 Bay College and Content Creators. Except where otherwise noted this work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Bay College
Author:
Dr. June Klees
Date Added:
02/20/2019
Bay College - HIST 212 - U.S. History 1865 to Present
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Online OER text created for U.S. History 1865 to Present by Dr. June Klees for Bay College.

© 2017 Bay College and Content Creators. Except where otherwise noted this work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Bay College
Author:
Dr. June Klees
Date Added:
02/20/2019
European History
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
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This project discovers the history of Modern Europe, starting at the Hundred Years War and ending at the present time.
A chronological perspective of history is attempted within this text. Although this is the case, it is also important to understand patterns within European History, therefore chapters will attempt to cover a breadth of material even though their titles might be that of a specific pattern in history rather than a time period.

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Wikibooks
Date Added:
11/11/2019
History in the Making: A History of the People of the United States of America to 1877
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CC BY-SA
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This textbook examines U.S. History from before European Contact through Reconstruction, while focusing on the people and their history. Prior to its publication, History in the Making underwent a rigorous double blind peer review, a process that involved over thirty scholars who reviewed the materially carefully, objectively, and candidly in order to ensure not only its scholarly integrity but also its high standard of quality. This book provides a strong emphasis on critical thinking about US History by providing several key features in each chapter. Learning Objectives at the beginning of each chapter help students to understand what they will learn in each chapter. Before You Move On sections at the end of each main section are designed to encourage students to reflect on important concepts and test their knowledge as they read. In addition, each chapter includes Critical Thinking Exercises that ask the student to deeply explore chapter content, Key Terms, and a Chronology of events.

Reviews available here: https://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/textbooks/history-in-the-making-a-history-of-the-people-of-the-united-states-of-america-to-1877

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University System of Georgia
Provider Set:
Galileo Open Learning Materials
Author:
Catherine Locks
Marie Lasseter
Pamela Roseman
Sarah Mergel
Tamara Spike
Date Added:
02/20/2019
Introduction to United States History: Colonial Period to the Civil War
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CC BY
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This course will introduce the student to United States history from the colonial period to the Civil War. The student will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place in America during this 250-year period. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Analyze the first encounters between the Native inhabitants of North America with Spanish, French, and English colonizers and determine the effect of European colonization on Native Americans; Describe and assess the creation of English/British America; Interpret the main social, political, and economic development of colonies in British North America, including the emergence of a slave economy; Analyze how and why an independent United States was created in 1776 by interpreting the ideological, political, and economic roots of American independence as it developed through the Seven YearsĺÎĺĺÎĺ War, the Imperial Crisis and the American Revolution; Analyze the myriad political and economic crises that plagued the Early American Republic in the 1780s and 1790s and identify and describe the expansion of slavery, partisan politics, economic innovation, westward expansion, and the outbreak of the War of 1812; Interpret the main developments of the Age of Jackson, the Indian Removal Act, the Nullification Crisis, the rise of the Whig Party, the Bank War; Interrogate the definition of 'democracy' in 1820s and 1830s America; Analyze the era of reform in antebellum America and identify and describe the emergence of new religious groups- Shakers, Mormons, evangelicals - as well as moral reformers who sought to curb alcoholism, improve the prison system, increase women's rights, end slavery, or modify the American education system; Analyze antebellum America and the emergence of sectionalism, and identify and describe how Northerners and Southerners apparently opposing viewpoints about labor systems, political economy, and race often obscured many similarities; Analyze the impact of the ideology of Manifest Destiny on the development of the American West as it affected Native Americans and white settlers; Identify and describe the West, the California Gold Rush, the Mexican War, and the contested boundary in the Pacific Northwest; Interpret how the question of slaveryĺÎĺĺÎĺs expansion affected American political parties, law, and created sectional conflict - both political and ideological - between 1820 and the 1850s; Analyze the American Civil War; identify and describe how and why the federal union that was created in 1776 collapsed in 1861; and assess the major facets of the war (including military engagements, the home fronts, Lincoln's presidency, and the question of slavery). (History 211)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
Religious Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
02/20/2019
Riots, Strikes, and Conspiracies in American History, Fall 2010
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This course uses readings and discussions to focus on a series of short-term events that shed light on American politics, culture, and social organization. It emphasizes finding ways to make sense of these complicated, highly traumatic events, and on using them to understand larger processes of change in American history. The class also gives students experience with primary documentation research through a term paper assignment.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Fogelson, Robert
Maier, Pauline
Date Added:
01/01/2010
U.S. History
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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U.S. History covers the breadth of the chronological history of the United States and also provides the necessary depth to ensure the course is manageable for instructors and students alike. U.S. History is designed to meet the scope and sequence requirements of most courses. The authors introduce key forces and major developments that together form the American experience, with particular attention paid to considering issues of race, class, and gender. The text provides a balanced approach to U.S. history, considering the people, events, and ideas that have shaped the United States from both the top down (politics, economics, diplomacy) and bottom up (eyewitness accounts, lived experience).

OpenStax College has compiled many resources for faculty and students, from faculty-only content to interactive homework and study guides.

Table of Contents
The Americas, Europe, and Africa Before 1492
Early Globalization: The Atlantic World, 1492–1650
Creating New Social Orders: Colonial Societies, 1500–1700
Rule Britannia! The English Empire, 1660–1763
Imperial Reforms and Colonial Protests, 1763-1774
America's War for Independence, 1775-1783
Creating Republican Governments, 1776–1790
Growing Pains: The New Republic, 1790–1820
The Industrial, Market, and Transportation Revolutions, 1800–1850
Jacksonian Democracy, 1820–1840
A Nation on the Move: Westward Expansion, 1800–1860
Cotton is King: The Antebellum South, 1800–1860
Antebellum Idealism and Reform Impulses, 1820–1860
Troubled Times: the Tumultuous 1850s
The Civil War, 1860–1865
The Era of Reconstruction, 1865–1877
Go West Young Man! Westward Expansion, 1840-1900
Industrialization and the Rise of Big Business, 1870-1900
The Growing Pains of Urbanization, 1870-1900
Politics in the Gilded Age, 1870-1900
Leading the Way: The Progressive Movement, 1890-1920
Age of Empire: American Foreign Policy, 1890-1914
Americans and the Great War, 1914-1919
The Jazz Age: Redefining the Nation, 1919-1929
Brother, Can You Spare a Dime? The Great Depression, 1929-1932
Franklin Roosevelt and the New Deal, 1932-1941
Fighting the Good Fight in World War II, 1941-1945
Post-War Prosperity and Cold War Fears, 1945-1960
Contesting Futures: America in the 1960s
Political Storms at Home and Abroad, 1968-1980
From Cold War to Culture Wars, 1980-2000
The Challenges of the Twenty-First Century

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
John M. Lund
OpenStax
P. Scott Corbett
Volker Janssen
Date Added:
06/12/2020
U.S. History
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
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U.S. History is designed to meet the scope and sequence requirements of most introductory courses. The text provides a balanced approach to U.S. history, considering the people, events, and ideas that have shaped the United States from both the top down (politics, economics, diplomacy) and bottom up (eyewitness accounts, lived experience). U.S. History covers key forces that form the American experience, with particular attention to issues of race, class, and gender.Senior Contributing AuthorsP. Scott Corbett, Ventura CollegeVolker Janssen, California State University, FullertonJohn M. Lund, Keene State CollegeTodd Pfannestiel, Clarion UniversityPaul Vickery, Oral Roberts UniversitySylvie Waskiewicz

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
05/07/2014
U.S. History, Growing Pains: The New Republic, 1790–1820, Partisan Politics
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CC BY
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By the end of this section, you will be able to:

Identify key examples of partisan wrangling between the Federalists and Democratic-Republicans
Describe how foreign relations affected American politics
Assess the importance of the Louisiana Purchase

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Module
Date Added:
09/20/2018
U.S. History I (HIST 146)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This course is the first in the introductory surveys of U.S. History. After exploring North America before the arrival of Europeans, students will study the early interactions of Europeans with indigenous peoples and, as the course progresses, study the history of peoples in the area now defined by the United States' borders. Those who would like to pursue their study of American history will also want to take Hist 147 (U.S. History II) and Hist 148 (U.S. History III).Login: guest_oclPassword: ocl

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
10/31/2011
U.S. History III (HIST 148)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
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This course is the third in the introductory surveys of U.S. history. The course surveys the significant forces and people that have shaped American civilization from the Progressive Era to the present. This course starts at the beginning of the 20th century and explores how different people, including you, participated in the nation's transformation through that century until today. Those who would like to pursue their study of American history may wish to take Hist 146 (US History I) and Hist 147 (US History II).Login: guest_oclPassword: ocl

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
10/31/2011
War and American Society
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This course will focus on the wars and military conflicts that have shaped the social, political, and economic development of the United States from the colonial era through the present. The student will learn how these conflicts have led to significant changes in America social and political life during this 300-year period. By the end of the course, you will understand how three centuries of warfare have reshaped America's relationship with the world and altered American society in unexpected ways. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: describe the impact of military conflicts on American society from the 18th century through the present; identify how the United States became involved in the First and Second World Wars and assess how these conflicts impacted American society; identify current military challenges faced by the United States and assess how these challenges will affect American society; analyze and interpret primary source documents from the 18th century through the present, using historical research methods. (History 313)

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
02/20/2019