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American Literature I (ENGL 246)
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In this class we will practice skills in reading, analyzing, and writing about fiction, poetry and drama from a select sampling of 20th Century American Literature. Through class discussion, close reading, and extensive writing practice, this course seeks to develop critical and analytical skills, preparing students for more advanced academic work.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
04/26/2019
American Women's Literature, 1847 to 1922
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating

LibriVox recording of a collection of 20 short stories and long-form poetry by American women writers. (Summary by BellonaTimes)

Includes selections from Mary E. Wilkins, Kate Chopin, Louisa May Alcott, Alice Dunbar, Willa Cather, Lola Ridge, Mary Eleanor Wilkins Freeman, Fannie Hurst, Zitkala-Sa, Amy Lowell, Hilda Doolittle, Elinor Wylie, Lucretia P. Hale, Edna Ferber, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Lydia Maria Child, Sara Teasdale, Susan Fenimore Cooper, and Elizabeth Stuart Phelps.

For further information, including links to online text, reader information, RSS feeds, CD cover or other formats (if available), please go to the LibriVox catalog page for this recording.

For more free audio books or to become a volunteer reader, visit LibriVox.org.

Download M4B (168MB)

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Alice Dunbar
Amy Lowell
and Elizabeth Stuart Phelps
Charlotte Perkins Gilman
Edna Ferber
Elinor Wylie
Fannie Hurst
Harriet Beecher Stowe
Hilda Doolittle
Kate Chopin
Lola Ridge
Louisa May Alcott
Lucretia P. Hale
Lydia Maria Child
Mary Eleanor Wilkins Freeman
Mary E. Wilkins
Sara Teasdale
Susan Fenimore Cooper
Willa Cather
Zitkala-Sa
Date Added:
07/29/2019
BC Reads: Adult Literacy Fundamental English - Reader 2
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This reader, written specifically for adults, contains eight chapters about Langston Hughes' family history and personal life. It includes excerpts from many of Hughes' poems and is designed to accompany the BC Reads: Adult Literacy Fundamental English - Course Pack 2. This level 2 reader, one of a series of six readers, is roughly equivalent to grades 1.5 to 3 in the K-12 system. Font size and line spacing can be adjusted in the online view, and have been enhanced for the print and PDF versions for easier reading. This reader has been reviewed by subject experts from colleges and universities.

Subject:
Literature and Composition
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
BCcampus
Provider Set:
BCcampus Open Textbooks
Author:
Shantel Ivits
Date Added:
05/17/2017
Children's Literature Course Materials
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Schneider, Jenifer. (2016). The Inside, Outside, and Upside Downs of Children’s Literature: From Poets and Pop-Ups to Princesses and Porridge. Open Education Resources. https://louis.oercommons.org/courses/the-inside-outside-and-upside-downs-of-children-s-literature-from-poets-and-pop-ups-to-princesses-and-porridge The following links of ancillary materials were adapted to support teacher preparation and children's literature courses for Elementary and Early Childhood Education majors. 

Subject:
Literature
Early Childhood Development
Educational Technology
Elementary Education
Higher Education
Louisiana History
Children's Literature
Poetry
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Data Set
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Roxanne Bourque
Date Added:
01/22/2021
Composing Your Life: Exploration of Self through Visual Arts and Writing, Spring 2006
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CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In this interdisciplinary seminar, we explore a variety of visual and written tools for self exploration and self expression. Through discussion, written assignments, and directed exercises, students practice utilizing a variety of media to explore and express who they are.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Visual Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Holly Sweet
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Contemporary Literature, Spring 2003
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CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Subject focuses on fiction, drama, and poetry and possibly films inspired by these topics mostly of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. This semester, Contemporary Literature (21L.488) deals with Irish literature, a subject broad and deep. To achieve a manageable volume of study, the course focuses primarily on poetry and prose, at drama's expense, and on living writers, at the expense of their predecessors. Each class session follows a discussion format, often with students assigned to lead-off or summarize the day's topic.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Hildebidle, John
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Cultural and Literary Expression in the English Renaissance
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

At the outset of the 16th century, Europeans tended to dismiss English literature as inferior to continental literary traditions; the educated Englishman was obliged to travel to the continent and speak in other languages in order to culture himself. By the end of the Renaissance, however, some of the greatest works in the English language from Shakespeare's dramas to Thomas More's Utopia had been written. In this course, the student will read and examine these works, situating them within their socio-historical and literary contexts, while attempting to determine how the art of English language and letters came into its own during this dynamic period. (English Literature 202)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Religious Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Digital Poetry, Fall 2005
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This class investigates theory and practice of digital or new media poetry with emphasis on workshop review of digital poetry created by students. Each week students examine published examples of digital poetry in a variety of forms including but not limited to soundscapes, hypertext poetry, animation, code poems, interactive games, location-based poems using handheld devices, digital video and wikis.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Barrett, Edward
Date Added:
01/01/2005
English Language Arts 11
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

English III, American Literature, explores the literature of America from the narratives of the early colonists to the foundational documents of our forefathers, and the literature of our modern times. In English III, you will gain a firm grasp of the various literary periods throughout American history as well as the ability to analyze different genres and styles of notable American authors. As you progress through the course, you will gain an appreciation for American literature and an understanding of how the literature of the day acted as a reflection of the historical period from which it evolved. This course will also give you the opportunity to hone your own writing skills as you identify the characteristics of effective writing for a variety of different purposes and audiences.

Subject:
Literature and Composition
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Reading
Unit of Study
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
English Romantic Poetry
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

In this course, the student will examine the revolutionary energy, fascination with nature, desire to create art for the masses, and inward-facing focus of the Romantic period. First, the student will look at the broader socio-historical and literary context in which English Romantic poetry thrived, then examine the Romantic poet and the outer world, the Romantic poet and the inner world, and the poetry that bridges the gap between the two, attempting to understand what makes each poem 'Romantic.' Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: provide an account of Romanticism as both an historical period as well as a movement in art and literature; identify and explain Romanticism in terms of its relation to the French Revolution; describe the new views of society and social relations that arose during this era; explain the significance of industrialization, the rise of the working class, the expansion of British Empire, the heightening of British nationalism, and the rise of the press; explain Romanticism's relationship to Neo-Classicism; list and describe the major tenets of Romanticism, including the movement's interests in the natural world, supernaturalism, revolution, morality, ethics, exoticism, urbanization, mindscapes, moods, imagination, and interiority; provide an account of the nature and function of the Romantic craft of authorship. (English Literature 404)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Foundations of Western Culture II, Fall 2002
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts; literary, philosophical, sociological; studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Fuller, Mary C.
Date Added:
01/01/2002
Freedom's Story: Teaching African American Literature and History
Restricted Use
Copyright Restricted
Rating

The National Humanities center presents this collection of essays by leading scholars on the topic ŇFreedomŐs Story: Teaching African American Literature and HistoryÓ. Topics include the affect of slavery on families, slave resistance, how to read slave narratives, Frederick Douglass, reconstruction, segregation, pigmentocracy, protest poetry, jazz, the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights Movement, and more.

Subject:
Literature and Composition
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
America In Class
Date Added:
11/11/2019
German III, Spring 2004
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This course expands skills in speaking, reading, listening, and writing. Students develop analytic and interpretative skills through the reading of a full-length drama as well as short prose and poetry (Biermann, Brecht, DĚ_rrenmatt, Tawada and others) and through media selections on contemporary issues in German-speaking cultures. Coursework includes discussions and compositions based on these texts, and review of grammar and development of vocabulary-building strategies. It is recommended for students with two years of high school German.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jaeger, Dagmar
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Interdisciplinary Approaches to Musical Time, January IAP 2010
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of three broad topics concerning music in relation to time.Music as Architecture: the creation of musical shapes in time;Music as Memory: how musical understanding depends upon memory and reminiscence, with attention to analysis of musical structures; andTime as the Substance of Music: how different disciplines such as philosophy and neuroscience view the temporal dimension of musical processes and/or performances.Classroom discussion of these topics is complemented by three weekend concerts with pre-concert forums, jointly presented by the Boston Chamber Music Society (BCMS) and MIT Music & Theater Arts.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Marks, Martin
Shadle, Charles
Thompson, Marcus A
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Introduction to Drama
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CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Introduction to Drama combines the literary arts of storytelling and poetry with the world of live performance. As a form of ritual as well as entertainment, drama has served to unite communities and challenge social norms, to vitalize and disturb its audiences. In order to understand this rich art form more fully, we will study and discuss a sampling of plays that exemplify different kinds of dramatic structure; class members will also participate in, attend, and review dramatic performances.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Henderson Diana
Prof Diana Henderson
Date Added:
07/29/2019
Introduction to Poetry and/or Drama Materials
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CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This course is designed as a basic introduction to poetry and/or drama. All resources are in the public domain, or they may be accessed through student/faculty searching sites like poetryfoundation.org. The linked resources are also public domain.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
LOUIS: The Louisiana Library Network
Author:
Michael Rather
Date Added:
03/11/2021
Invitation to World Literature
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating

Great epics, plays, poetry, and other literary texts have made their way around the world through time and translation, and are still captivating audiences today. This multimedia resource invites viewers to appreciate and - most importantly - read these ancient and modern works. The 13 texts are introduced on video by a wide-ranging cast including scholars, translators, artists, and writers. Excerpts of the texts are found on an extensive Web site along with background material and reading support; an interactive timeline and a feature on translation; and resources for teaching and further study.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Reading
Provider:
Annenberg Learner
Author:
David Damrosch
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Japanese IV, Spring 2009
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

"This course covers Japanese: The Spoken Language lessons 17 through 22. It will further develop the four basic skills, speaking, listening, reading and writing, that students have acquired through Japanese I, II and III courses, with emphasis on oral communication skills in various practical situations. Students will learn approximately 100 Kanji characters in this course. Sessions in English cover grammar explanation, socio-cultural information and other important issues for using the language, while Japanese lessons focus on the actual use of the language, integrating students' prior knowledge with newly learned patterns, and communicating within the frame given in the class."

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Nagatomi, Ayumi
Nagaya, Yoshimi
Shingu, Ikue
Date Added:
01/01/2009
Leyendas y arquetipos del Romanticismo español
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

Leyendas y arquetipos del Romanticismo español is an introduction to nineteenth-century Spanish literature with a thematic focus on legends and archetypes. It presents Romanticism in the context of nineteenth-century literary and social movements. It is designed as a first anthology for intermediate Spanish students at American universities. Although brief, it includes poetry, drama in verse and short story. The works have been selected for their literary interest and the social importance of their themes. They are all by canonical authors.
The Prologue and introductions to the authors and texts often utilize circumlocution to facilitate comprehension, and include concrete examples of the concepts presented. The author biographies are brief and should not be used as study materials, but rather as starting points for students’ own exploration. Many students prefer following their own interests when researching author biographies, and the internet makes accessible a plethora of bibliographic resources, such as the Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes, the Centro Virtual Cervantes of the Cervantes Institute, or the Biblioteca Digital Hispánica of the Spanish National Library. Student participation in the selection of topics and sources emphasizes the investigative process and leads to richer class discussions.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Portland State University
Provider Set:
PDXOpen
Author:
Robert Sanders
Date Added:
01/05/2016
Major Authors: John Milton, Spring 2008
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In 1667, John Milton published what he intended both as the crowning achievement of a poetic career and a justification of God's ways to man: an epic poem which retold and reimagined the Biblical story of creation, temptation, and original sin. Even in a hostile political climate, Paradise Lost was almost immediately recognized as a classic, and one fate of a classic is to be rewritten, both by admirers and by antagonists. In this seminar, we will read Paradise Lost alongside works of 20th century fantasy and science fiction which rethink both Milton's text and its source.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Fuller, Mary
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Major Authors: Rewriting Genesis: Paradise Lost and Twentieth-Century Fantasy, Spring 2009
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CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

What does the Genesis story of creation and temptation tell us about gender, about heterosexuality, and about the origins of evil? What is the nature of God, and how can we account for that nature in a cosmos where evil exists? When is rebellion justified, and when is authority legitimate? These are some of the key questions that engaged the poet John Milton, and that continue to engage readers of his work.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Fuller, Mary
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Major Poets, Fall 2005
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CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Emphasis on the analytical reading of lyric poetry in England and the United States. Syllabus usually includes Shakespeare's sonnets, Donne, Keats, Dickinson, Frost, Eliot, Marianne Moore, Lowell, Rich, and Bishop. This subject is an introduction to poetry as a genre; most of our texts are originally written in English. We read poems from the Renaissance through the 17th and 18th centuries, Romanticism, and Modernism. Focus will be on analytic reading, on literary history, and on the development of the genre and its forms; in writing we attend to techniques of persuasion and of honest evidenced sequential argumentation. Poets to be read will include William Shakespeare, Queen Elizabeth, William Wordsworth, John Keats, T.S. Eliot, Langston Hughes, Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, and some contemporary writers.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Tapscott, Stephen
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Modern Poetry, Spring 2002
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Consideration of some substantial twentieth-century poetic voices. Authors vary, but may include Moore, Frost, Eliot, Stevens, and Pound. This course considers some of the substantial early twentieth-century poetic voices in America. Authors vary, but may include Moore, Frost, Eliot, Stevens, and Pound. We'll read the major poems by the most important poets in English in the 20th century, emphazinig especially the period between post-WWI disillusionment and early WW II internationalism (ca. 1918-1940). Our special focus this term will be how the concept of "the Image" evolved during this period. The War had undercut beliefs in master-narratives of nationalism and empire, and the language-systems that supported them (religious transcendence, rationalism and formalism). Retrieving energies from the Symbolist movements of the preceding century, early 20th century poets began to rethink how images carry information, and in what ways the visual, visionary, and verbal image can take the place of transcendent beliefs. New theories of linguistics and anthropology helped to advance this interest in the artistic/religious image. So did Freud. So did Charlie Chaplin films. We'll read poems that pay attention both to this disillusionment and to the compensatory joyous attention to the image: to ideas of the poet-as-language-priest, aesthetic-experience-as-displaced-religious impulse, to poetry as faith, ritual, and form.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Tapscott, Stephen
Date Added:
01/01/2002
Modern Poetry and Poetics
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course will ask what makes poetry 'modern?' The student will discuss the cultural and political history of the period as well as the major movements that comprise 'modern poetry,' stopping to become acquainted with its noteworthy practitioners and perform close-readings of their works. By the end of this course, the student will have critically explored the concept of modern poetry, identifying its characteristic techniques, concerns, and figures. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: describe Modernity/Modernism as both a historical period and a movement in art and literature; define and differentiate between the terms modern, modernism, and modernity; define Victorianism and explain its relationship to Modernism; describe the nature of turn-of-the-twentieth-century poetry in both England and France; define Symbolism, Dandyism, Aestheticism, and Decadence; provide accounts of the origins of the Great War, life in Edwardian England, and World War II; list, compare, and contrast the major authors of the early 1900s, of World War I, the Lost Generation, World War II, the Great Depression, the Holocaust, High Modernism, the Harlem Renaissance, and the post-WWII period. (English Literature 408)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Performing Arts
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Naming the Unnameable: An Approach to Poetry for New Generations
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Informed by a writing philosophy that values both spontaneity and discipline, Michelle Bonczek Evory’s Naming the Unnameable: An Approach to Poetry for New Generations offers practical advice and strategies for developing a writing process that is centered on play and supported by an understanding of America’s rich literary traditions. With consideration to the psychology of invention, Bonczek Evory provides students with exercises aimed to make writing in its early stages a form of play that gives way to more enriching insights through revision, embracing the writing of poetry as both a love of language and a tool that enables us to explore ourselves and better understand the world. The volume includes resources for students seeking to publish and build a writing-centered lifestyle or career. Poets featured range in age, subject, and style, and many are connected to colleges in the State University of New York system. Naming the Unnameable promotes an understanding of poetry as a living art of which students are a part, and provides ways for students to involve themselves in the growing contemporary poetry community that thrives in America today.

Reviews available here: https://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/textbooks/naming-the-unnameable-an-approach-to-poetry-for-new-generations

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
State University of New York
Provider Set:
OpenSUNY Textbooks
Author:
Michelle Bonczek Evory
Date Added:
03/09/2018
Poetry in Translation, Spring 2006
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This seminar addresses the inherent challenges of translating poetry from different languages, cultures and eras. Students do some translation of their own, though accommodations are made if a student lacks even a basic knowledge of any foreign language.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Asarina, Alevtina
Date Added:
01/01/2006
The Poetry of John Milton
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

In this course, the student will study the poetry of John Milton, focusing on the texts and contexts that are relevant to Milton's oeuvre. Who was John Milton, and how did he manage to write Paradise Lost? By the end of this course, the student will possess a comprehensive understanding of Milton, his times, and his works. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: explain the social and historical context of John Milton's work; define some of the most important ideas related to Milton's life and times, including (but not limited to) Calvinism, Puritanism, Protestantism, Neo-Classicism, and Predestination; provide accounts of the life of Charles I, the significance of the British Commonwealth, and the Restoration of the Monarchy; explain Milton's major philosophies, his politics, and his religious beliefs; describe Milton's chosen literary forms and rhetoric; provide a brief account of Milton's life, his relationship to Cavalier Poetry, his early elegies and eulogies, and his pastoral elegies, sonnets, and odes; list and describe the major plot developments that occur in Paradise Lost as well as Paradise Regained; analyze and describe both Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained in terms of their respective treatments of Biblical versions of Heaven and Hell, the Creation, Predestination, gender relations, representations of human nature, and the Fall of humankind; discuss the formal aspects and structure of both Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained and analyze and describe both of these works in terms of their epic styles and conventions. (English Literature 402)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Religious Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Prizewinners, Spring 2007
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CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This 6-unit subject gives students the opportunity to immerse themselves in the poetry of two living Nobel Laureates: the Caribbean poet, Derek Walcott, and the Northern-Irish poet, Seamus Heaney. We will begin and end the semester with their magnificent epic works: Heaney's translation of the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf, and Walcott's Omeros (a modern epic set in the West Indies). Between these major narrative poems, we will read a rich selection of their shorter poems, as well as some of their reflections in prose on what poetry does, on what other poets do, and what it means to write in English from the historical and political situation of Northern Ireland (for Heaney) or the Caribbean (for Walcott).

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Fuller, Mary
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Reading Poetry, Spring 2009
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

""Reading Poetry" has several aims: primarily, to increase the ways you can become more engaged and curious readers of poetry; to increase your confidence as writers thinking about literary texts; and to provide you with the language for literary description. The course is not designed as a historical survey course but rather as an introductory approach to poetry from various directions -- as public or private utterances; as arranged imaginative shapes; and as psychological worlds, for example. One perspective offered is that poetry offers intellectual, moral and linguistic pleasures as well as difficulties to our private lives as readers and to our public lives as writers. Expect to hear and read poems aloud and to memorize lines; the class format will be group discussion, occasional lecture."

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Vaeth, Kim
Date Added:
01/01/2009
Reading Poetry, Spring 2018
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

How do you read a poem? Intuition is not the only answer. In this class, we will investigate some of the formal tools poets use—meter, sound, syntax, word-choice, and other properties of language—as well as exploring a range of approaches to reading poetry, from the old (memorization and reading out loud) to the new (digitally enabled visualization and annotation). We will use readings available online via the generosity of the Poetry Foundation and the Academy of American Poets. We will also think collectively about how to approach difficult poems.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Mary Fuller
Date Added:
04/25/2019
Romantic-Era Songs
Restricted Use
Copyright Restricted
Rating

This not-for-profit site is intended to make vocal music and lyrics of the of the early 19th century in the British Isles, Europe, Canada, the United States, and Australia more accessible. It includes contemporary music of the period and later settings (e.g., Brian Holmes's complete score for Death's Jest Book and Lori Lange's settings of Byron lyrics).

Subject:
Literature and Composition
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
San Jose State University
Date Added:
11/11/2019
Romantic Poetry, Spring 2005
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Close readings of the major British Romantic poets (Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Scott, Shelley, Keats), perhaps including some of the period's important fiction writers (e.g. Mary Shelley, Walter Scott). Some attention to literary and historical context. Lecture/discussion; at least two papers.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jackson, Noel
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Shakespeare
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

In this course, the student will attempt to determine why Shakespeare's works have become so widely revered. The student will begin by familiarizing ourselves with Elizabethan theatre, language, and culture, then conduct close readings of Shakespeare's most acclaimed plays, ending with his poetry. By the end of this course, you will have developed a strong understanding of Shakespeare's works and working knowledge of the Elizabethan Period in which he wrote. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: identify, compare, and contrast the major dramas and poems produced by William Shakespeare; describe Shakespeare's identity as well as provide an account of his life and the legacy of his work; describe Elizabethan England in social and historical context; list the major figures who likely shaped the work of Shakespeare; explain the origins of Shakespearean drama in Greek theater; define a variety of Shakespearean dramatic forms, including Shakespearean tragedy, history, and comedy plays; identify and describe the major themes of Shakespearean tragedy, comedy, and history plays; explain the roots of the Shakespearean sonnet in earlier sonnet traditions; identify and describe the major themes and ideas at work in Shakespearean sonnets. (English Literature 401)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Shakespeare and Voice
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Linda Gates, Professor of Voice at Northwestern University (USA) discusses how Shakespeare's poetry and plays lend themselves to vocal performance by discussing how breath can be used to 'punctuate the thought'. This audio recording is part the Interviews on Great Writers series presented by Oxford University Podcasts.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Oxford
Provider Set:
University of Oxford Podcasts
Author:
Linda Gates
Date Added:
08/01/2012
Spanish for Bilingual Students, Spring 2003
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Designed for students of Hispanic descent and raised in the US. Expands oral and written grammar study and increases contact with standard Spanish. Studies recent fiction and poetry as well as specific historical, social, economic, and political aspects of Mexican-American, Puerto Rican, and Cuban cultures. Many of the nonliterary readings are in English; class discussions in Spanish. Taught in Spanish. Fron the course home page: Course Description Spanish for Bilingual Students is an intermediate course designed principally for heritage learners, but which includes other students interested in specific content areas, such as US Latino immigration, identity, ethnicity, education and representation in the media. Linguistic goals include vocabulary acquisition, improvement in writing, and enhancement of formal communicative skills.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Morgenstern, Douglas
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Studies in Poetry: 20th Century Irish Poetry: The Shadow of W. B. Yeats, Spring 2008
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William Butler Yeats occupies a dominant position in the lives and work of the Irish poets who followed him. We will explore some of that poetry, and consider how later poets, especially female poets, tried to come to grips with, or escape from, that dominance. As a seminar, the subject will place special emphasis on student involvement and control. I will ask you to submit one ten-twelve page essay, two shorter (five page) essays, and to accept the role of "leadoff person," perhaps more than once, That role will demand that you choose from among the assigned readings for that session the poem we should focus upon, and to offer either a provocative articulation of what the poem is about, or a provocative question which the poem confronts, and which we should grapple with, as well.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Hildebidle, John
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Studies in Poetry: Does Poetry Matter, Fall 2002
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Extensive reading of works by a few major poets. Emphasizes the evolution of each poet's work and the questions of poetic influence and literary tradition. Instruction and practice in oral and written communication. Topic for Fall: Does Poetry Matter? Topic for Spring: Gender and Lyric Poetry. From the course home page Course Description The landscape we will explore is the troublesome one of the relevance, impact, and importance of poetry in a troubled modern world. We will read both poetry and prose by several substantial modern writers, each of whom confronted the question that is the subject's title.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Hildebidle, John
Date Added:
01/01/2002
Studies in Poetry: Gender and Lyric -- Renaissance Men and Women Writing about Love, Spring 2003
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Extensive reading of works by a few major poets. Emphasizes the evolution of each poet's work and the questions of poetic influence and literary tradition. Instruction and practice in oral and written communication. Topic for Fall: Does Poetry Matter? Topic for Spring: Gender and Lyric Poetry. The core of this seminar will be the great sequences of English love sonnets written by William Shakespeare, Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, and Mary Wroth. These poems cover an enormous amount of aesthetic and psychological ground: ranging from the utterly subjective to the entirely public or conventional, from licit to forbidden desires, they might also serve as a manual of experimentation with the resources of sound, rhythm, and figuration in poetry. Around these sequences, we will develop several other contexts, using both Renaissance texts and modern accounts: the Petrarchan literary tradition (poems by Francis Petrarch and Sir Thomas Wyatt); the social, political, and ethical uses of love poetry (seduction, getting famous, influencing policy, elevating morals, compensating for failure); other accounts of ideal masculinity and femininity (conduct manuals, theories of gender and anatomy); and the other limits of the late sixteenth century vogue for love poetry: narrative poems, pornographic poems, poems that don't work.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Fuller, Mary C.
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Texts, Topics, and Times in German Literature, Fall 2009
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"In diesem Kurs erhalten Sie einen ?berblick ?ber einige wichtige literarische Texte, Tendenzen und Themen aus der deutschsprachigen Literatur- und Kulturszene. Wir werden literarische Texte, Gedichte, Theaterst?cke und Essays untersuchen, sowie andere ?sthetische Formen besprechen, wie Film und Architektur. Da alle Texte gleichzeitig in ihrem spezifischen kulturellen Kontext gelesen werden, tragen sie zu einem Verst?ndnis von verschiedenen historischen Aspekten bei. Unter anderen werden folgende Themen und Fragestellungen besprochen: Technologie und deren Einfluss auf die Gesellschaft, Fragen der Ethik bei wissenschaftlicher Arbeit, Konstruktion von nationaler Geschichte und kollektivem Ged?chtnis."

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jaeger, Dagmar
Date Added:
01/01/2009