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The Age of Reason: Europe from the 17th to the Early 19th Centuries, Spring 2011
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This course asks students to consider the ways in which social theorists, institutional reformers, and political revolutionaries in the 17th through 19th centuries seized upon insights developed in the natural sciences and mathematics to change themselves and the society in which they lived. Students study trials, art, literature and music to understand developments in Europe and its colonies in these two centuries. Covers works by Newton, Locke, Voltaire, Rousseau, Marx, and Darwin.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ravel, Jeffrey S.
Date Added:
01/01/2011
The Age of Revolutions in the Atlantic World, 1776-1848
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This course introduces the history of the Age of Revolutions in the Atlantic World from 1776 to 1848. Running alongside and extending beyond these political revolutions is the First Industrial Revolution. The Atlantic World, dominated by European empires in 1776, was transformed through revolution into a series of independent states by 1848, experiencing profound changes through the development and consolidation of capitalism. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: think analytically about the history of the revolutionary age between 1776 and 1848; define what a revolution" means as well as describe what made 1776-1848 an "age of revolution"; define the concept of the Atlantic World and describe its importance in World History; explain the basic intellectual and technical movements associated with the Enlightenment and their relations to the revolutionary movements that follow; identify and describe the causes of the American Revolution; identify and describe the many stages of the French Revolution: the end of absolutist monarchy, the implementation of constitutional monarchy, and the rise of the Jacobin Republic; compare and contrast the Declaration of the Rights of Man and other major statements of the Revolutionary period and Enlightenment thinking; identify and describe the impact of the first successful slave rebellion in world history--the Haitian Revolution; compare and contrast the debate between Edmund Burke and Thomas Paine; analyze and interpret primary source documents that elucidate the causes and effects of the Age of Revolutions. This free course may be completed online at any time. (History 303)

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
02/20/2019
The Age of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1500-1900
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This course will introduce the student to the history of the Atlantic slave trade from 1500 to 1900. The student will learn about the slave trade, its causes, and its effects on Africa, Europe, and the Americas. By the end of the course, the student will understand how the Atlantic slave trade began as a fledgling enterprise of the English, Portuguese, and Spanish in the 1500s and why, by the mid-eighteenth century, the trade dominated Atlantic societies and economies. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: think analytically about the various meanings of 'slave' and 'slavery' during the age of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the 'triangular trade' and define the Atlantic World; identify and describe the logic for enslavement of Africans by Europeans; identify and describe the African ethnic groups enslaved by Europeans and those captives' New World destinations; identify and describe the early slaving voyages of the Portuguese and Spanish. Students will also be able to describe how the Dutch and English later inserted themselves into the trade; identify and describe the expansion of the plantation complex in the New World in the 1600s and its impact on the Atlantic slave trade; identify and analyze the rise of European empires and the parallel expansion of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and analyze slavery within African societies. They will also be able to identify and describe the trans-Saharan slave trade and the Red Sea/Indian Ocean slave trade; identify and describe the nature of the African slave market and principal slaving ports in western Africa; analyze and describe New World slave societies and their impact on the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the 'Middle Passage' of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the causes for the abolition of the Atlantic slave trade in the nineteenth century; analyze and interpret primary source documents that elucidate all aspects of the Atlantic slave trade. (History 311)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
02/20/2019
Ancient Civilizations of the World
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In this course, the student will study the emergence of the major civilizations of the ancient world, beginning with the Paleolithic Era (about 2.5 million years ago) and finishing with the end of the Middle Ages in fifteenth century A.D. The student will pay special attention to how societies evolved across this expanse of time - from fragmented and primitive agricultural communities to more advanced and consolidated civilizations. By the end of the course, the student will possess a thorough understanding of important overarching social, political, religious, and economic themes in the ancient world, ranging from the emergence of Confucian philosophy in Asia to the fall of imperial Rome. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify and define the world's earliest civilizations, including the Neolithic Revolution, and describe how it shaped the development of these early civilizations; Identify, describe, and compare/contrast the first advanced civilizations in the world - Mesopotamia and Egypt; Identify and describe the emergence of the earliest civilizations in Asia: the Harappan and Aryan societies on the Indian subcontinent and the Shang and Zhou societies in China; Identify and describe the emergence of new philosophies - Daoism and Confucianism - during the Warring States period in China. Identify and describe the subsequent rise of the Qin and Han dynasties; Identify and describe the different periods that characterized ancient Greece - Archaic Greece (or the Greek Dark Ages), classical Greece, and the Hellenistic era; Identify and describe the characteristics of the Roman Kingdom, the Roman Republic, and Imperial Rome; Analyze the emergence of the Mauryan and Gupta empires during the 'classical age' in India; Identify and analyze the Buddhist and Vedic (Hindu) faiths; Identify and describe the rise of civilizations in the Americas, particularly in Meso and South America; Analyze and describe the rise of Islam in the Middle East; Identify and describe the emergence of the Arab caliphate, the Umayyad dynasty, and Abbasid dynasty; Identify and describe the rise and fall of the Byzantine Empire; Identify and analyze key facets of medieval society in Western EuropeĺÎĺĚ_ĺÜthe Catholic Church, feudalism, and the rise of technology and commerce; Analyze and interpret primary-source documents that elucidate the exchanges and advancements made in civilizations across time and space. (History 101)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
02/20/2019
Colonial Latin and South America
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This course will introduce the student to the history of Latin and South America from the year in which European explorers first discovered and began to colonize the region to the early 19th century, when many Latin and South American colonies declared their independence from European rule. The student will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place throughout Latin and South America during this 400-year period. By the end of the course, the student will understand how the interaction between native peoples and European settlers created diverse and complex colonial societies throughout Latin and South America, and why the colonies of the region eventually declared their independence from European political control. Upon successful completion of this course, student will be able to: Think critically about the history of Latin and South America from the pre-colonial period though the beginning of the 19th century; Compare and contrast the political, economic, and social practices of the peoples of Iberia, Africa, and the Americas in the pre-colonial period; Analyze the political, social, and military interactions between Iberian explorers and conquerors and the indigenous peoples of the Americas in the 15th and 16th centuries; Identify how Spanish colonists settled Latin and South America in the 16th century and analyze the role played by imperial and religious institutions in colonization efforts; Assess the role of European Mercantile policies in the formation of colonial economies and trade networks; Analyze the structure of Spanish and Portuguese colonial societies and assess the role of women, indigenous peoples, and Afro-Latinos in these societies; Students will be able to assess the status of Latin and South American colonies in the Spanish and Portuguese Empires of the 17th and 18th centuries and identity how European conflicts affected political and economic life in the colonies; Identify how the Napoleonic Wars of the early 19th century led to the rise of independence movements in the colonies of Latin and South America; Assess how political revolutions and wars for independence throughout Latin and South America ended European colonial control of the region, and compare and contrast the consequences of these revolutions for ethnic European and indigenous populations; Analyze and interpret primary source documents from the pre-colonial period though the beginning of the 19th century using historical research methods. (History 221)

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
02/20/2019
Comparative New Worlds, 1400-1750
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This course will introduce the student to a comparative history of New World societies from 1400 to 1750. The student will learn about European exploration and colonization as well as the culture of native peoples of the Americas. By the end of the course, you will understand how the New World evolved from fledgling settlements into profitable European colonies and how New World societies were highly varied polities. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: analyze what constituted the 'New World' in the fifteenth century; identify and describe the major tribes/native civilizations of North America, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean at the time of European contact; identify and describe the effects of European colonization on native peoples; identify and describe the reasons for the European Age of Discovery in the New World; identify and describe early New World exploration and initial settlements by Portugal and Spain; identify and describe how and why the consolidation of powerful European states in the 1600s resulted in New World exploration, settlement, and commerce; compare and contrast New France, French Louisiana, the French West Indies, and French Guiana; compare and contrast British North America (New England, Middle and Lower Colonies), the British West Indies, and British Central and South America; compare and contrast New Spain, the Spanish Caribbean, and Spanish South America; analyze and describe Portuguese Brazil; identify and describe the African slave trade and will also be able to compare and contrast the enslavement of Africans in New World societies; identify and describe inter-European conflicts and European-Native Indian violence in the New World; analyze and interpret primary source documents that elucidate the causes and effects of exploration and colonization in the New World. (History 321)

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
02/20/2019
A Comprehensive Outline Of World History
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A textbook that covers major events from the beginning of time until 1900. The text is divided first by time period and then by region and country within the period. Learn about the following topics in this world history textbook:Ice Age, Neanderthals, Mesolithic Age, Stone Age, Bronze Age, Iron Age,  Ancient Egypt, Greek Empire, Roman Empire, Nomads, Han Dynasty, Mayan Empire, Byzantine Empire, Dark Ages, Barbarians, Turkish Empire, Viking Empire, Vikings, Charlemagne, Classical Period, Middle Ages, Mongol Empire, Genghis Khan, Black Death, Plague, Colonization, America, Pilgrims, Ottoman Empire, American Revolution, Industrial Revolution, Reconstruction, Renaissance, Age of Discovery, Elizabethan Era, Reformation Era, Age of Enlightenment. Suggested Level: UP (Upper Primary)

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Jack E. Maxfield
Date Added:
11/11/2019
Einstein, Oppenheimer, Feynman: Physics in the 20th Century, Spring 2011
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This course covers the role of physics and physicists during the 20th century, focusing on Einstein, Oppenheimer, and Feynman. Beyond just covering the scientific developments, institutional, cultural, and political contexts will also be examined.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
World History
Physics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kaiser, David
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Empire and States in the Middle East and Southwest Asia
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This course introduces the history of the Middle East and Southwest Asia from the pre-Islamic period to the end of World War I. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: discuss the history of East Asia from the pre-Islamic period through the beginning of the 20th century; analyze the interactions between ancient civilizations of the Middle East and Southwest Asia in the pre-Islamic period; identify the origins of Islam, and assess the political and cultural impact of the Muslim faith on the peoples of the Middle East and the Mediterranean Basin; identify the origins of the Umayyad and Abbasid Empires, and assess how these dynasties reshaped political and economic life throughout the Middle East and Southwest Asia; describe and assess the social and cultural impact of Islam on the peoples of the Middle East and the Mediterranean Basin; identify external threats to the Muslim world during the Middle Ages, and analyze how Muslim leaders responded to these threats; identify the origins of the Ottoman Empire, and assess how the Ottomans established political and economic control over the Eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East; analyze the political, economic, and military interactions between the Ottoman Empire and the nations of Europe in the 18th and 19th centuries; explain how European imperialism destabilized the Middle East and Southwest Asia in the 19th and early 20th centuries and allowed European nations to establish political control over many Middle Eastern nations; analyze the political impact of World War I on the peoples and nations of the Middle East; analyze and interpret primary source documents from the pre-Islamic period through the beginning of the 20th century using historical research methods. This free course may be completed online at any time. (History 231)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
02/20/2019
Environmental History
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This course will focus on the history of mankind's relationship with the natural world. The student will examine how environmental factors have shaped the development and growth of civilizations around the world and analyze how these civilizations have altered their environments in positive and negative ways. By the end of the course, the student will better understand the reciprocal relationship between human beings and the natural environment and how this relationship has evolved throughout human history. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: think critically about the historical relationship between humans and the natural environment; identify how early humans modified and adapted natural resources for agricultural and commercial purposes; analyze how human settlements altered the natural environment and evaluate how environmental factors shaped the growth of early civilizations; evaluate how new agricultural and commercial practices altered the natural environment across the globe during the Middle Ages; identify how environmental factors, such as disease and pollution, shaped political and social life in Europe during the Early-Modern Era; evaluate how the Columbian Exchange resulted in significant ecological and biological changes in Europe and the Americas and dramatically altered human societies on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean; analyze the impact of industrialization on human society during the Modern Era and evaluate how governmental and nongovernmental actors have attempted to ameliorate the negative environmental consequences of industrialization; identify current environmental challenges facing humanity and analyze these challenges from a historical perspective; analyze and interpret primary and secondary source documents relating to environmental history using historical research methods. (History 364)

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
02/20/2019
European History
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This project discovers the history of Modern Europe, starting at the Hundred Years War and ending at the present time.
A chronological perspective of history is attempted within this text. Although this is the case, it is also important to understand patterns within European History, therefore chapters will attempt to cover a breadth of material even though their titles might be that of a specific pattern in history rather than a time period.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Wikibooks
Date Added:
11/11/2019
France, 1660-1815: Enlightenment, Revolution, Napoleon, Spring 2011
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This course covers French politics, culture, and society from Louis XIV to Napoleon Bonaparte. Attention is given to the growth of the central state, the beginnings of a modern consumer society, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, including its origins, and the rise and fall of Napoleon.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jeffrey S.
Ravel
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Global Perspectives on Industrialization
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This course will focus on the emergence and evolution of industrial societies around the world. The student will begin by comparing the legacies of industry in ancient and early modern Europe and Asia and examining the agricultural and commercial advances that laid the groundwork for the Industrial Revolution. The student will then follow the history of industrialization in different parts of the world, taking a close look at the economic, social, and environmental effects of industrialization. This course ultimately examines how industrialization developed, spread across the globe, and shaped everyday life in the modern era. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify key ideas and events in the history of industrialization; identify connections between the development of capitalism and the development of modern industry; use analytical tools to evaluate the factors contributing to industrial change in different societies; identify the consequences of industrialization in the 19th and 20th centuries in different societies; critique historical interpretations of the causes and effects of industrialization; and analyze and interpret primary source documents describing the process of industrialization and life in industrial societies. (History 363)

Subject:
World History
Economics
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
02/20/2019
HIST 1112 - World Civilizations II
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Welcome to HIST 1112, World Civilizations II.

The information resources linked from this website/course guide are all free to you as students and provide the reading materials for this course (there is no textbook.)

Readings cover:
Mongols in World History
The Discovery Age
Early Modern World
The Enlightenment
Atlantic Slave Trade
Industrial Revolution
Age of Imperialism
Revolution and Nationalism
WWI
WWII
The Cold War
The Contemporary World

The writing tab leads examples of successful writing assignments for this course. Also find there guides to the process--both written prompts and people to contact for guidance. Similarly the research tabs leads to tools and resources that help to make the research process efficient and successful.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Hongjie Wang
Juanjuan Peng
Date Added:
02/13/2020
History 1111, World Civilizations I
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Welcome to History 1111, World Civilizations I.

The information resources linked from this website/course guide are all free to you as students and provide the reading material for this course (there is no textbook.)

Readings cover:
Prehistory and agricultural revolution
Mesopotamia
Egypt
Greece
Rome
Arabia (Islam)
India
Africa
Mongols
China
Japan
Byzantium
Christianity and the Church
Europe
Americas

The writing tab leads examples of successful writing assignments for this course. Also find there guides to the process--both written prompts and people to contact for guidance. Similarly the research tabs leads to tools and resources that help to make the research process efficient and successful.

Finally please notice contact information for your History faculty member and one of the librarians from Lane Library. We are here to help, please contact us with questions, comments, ideas!

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Reading
Date Added:
02/13/2020
History of Africa to 1890
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This course introduces the history of Africa from 300,000 BCE to the era of European imperialism in the nineteenth century. The story continues in HIST 252, which covers the last 120 years of African history. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: locate major regions, geographic features, and populations in Africa and label them on a map; identify major events and trends in the history of Africa prior to 1890 that describe change over time; demonstrate the impact of the African environment on human history in Africa and explain how humans in turn changed that environment; compare and contrast the diverse social and political structures and systems devised by Africans; summarize the connections between Africans and other peoples of the world and the ways in which those connections changed over time; demonstrate the usefulness, best practices, and limitations of different types of sources for understanding the African past; appraise various conceptions of the African past given the evidence from that past; assess the degree to which there can be said to be one, shared African history before 1890. This free course may be completed online at any time. (History 251)

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
02/20/2019
History of Applied Science & Technology
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This textbook is designed to to meet the needs of History of Applied Science and Technology courses at colleges and universities around the world. Chapters will be organized around the theme of the transformative impact of technological and epistemological changes on worldview and human behavior as they relate to everyday life and global choices. We believe this textbook is the first History of Applied Science and Technology textbook to take a global approach, addressing persistent gaps in coverage in Africa, Asia, and the Americas. This is a collaborative, open access project.

Table of Contents:
I. Chapter 1 - Ancient Mesopotamia and the Fertile Crescent (Prehistory - ca 1750 BCE)
II. Chapter 2 - The Ancient World (before 500 BCE) – Farmers to Pharaohs
III. Chapter 5 - The Medieval Period (500 to 1400 CE) – Europe
IV. Chapter 8 - The Early Modern Period (1500-1600) – Europe – Phase I: Breakthroughs in Scientific Thought & Technological Application
V. Chapter 9 - The Early Modern Period (1600-1750) – Europe – Phase 2: The New Science of the Seventeenth Century & The Enlightenment
VI. Chapter 12 - The New Scientific Revolution - The Long 19th Century
VII. Chapter 14 - Earth Sciences and Revolution in Biology and Genetics – the Long 19th Century
VIII. Editors
IX. Authors
X. Cover & Book Design
XI. Section Editors

Subject:
Computer Science
History
World Civilization
World History
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Bonnie Kim
Danielle Skjelver
David Arnold
Hans Peter Broedel
Sharon Bailey Glasco
Sheryl Dahm Broedel
University System of North Dakota.
Date Added:
04/26/2021
History of International Relations
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating

Existing textbooks on international relations treat history in a cursory fashion and perpetuate a Euro-centric perspective. This textbook pioneers a new approach by historicizing the material traditionally taught in International Relations courses, and by explicitly focusing on non-European cases, debates and issues.

The volume is divided into three parts. The first part focuses on the international systems that traditionally existed in Europe, East Asia, pre-Columbian Central and South America, Africa and Polynesia. The second part discusses the ways in which these international systems were brought into contact with each other through the agency of Mongols in Central Asia, Arabs in the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean, Indic and Sinic societies in South East Asia, and the Europeans through their travels and colonial expansion. The concluding section concerns contemporary issues: the processes of decolonization, neo-colonialism and globalization – and their consequences on contemporary society.

Table of Contents
1. Introduction
2. China and East Asia
3. India and Indianization
4. The Muslim Caliphates
5. The Mongol Khanates
6. Africa
7. The Americas
8. European Expansion

Subject:
World History
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Erik Ringmar
Date Added:
06/11/2020
History of International Relations: A Non-European Perspective
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CC BY
Rating

This textbook pioneers a new approach to the study of international relations by historicizing the material traditionally taught in international relations courses and by explicitly focusing on non-European cases, debates, and issues. The volume is divided into three parts. The first part focuses on the international systems that traditionally existed in Europe, East Asia, pre-Columbian Central and South America, Africa, and Polynesia. The second part discusses the ways in which these international systems were brought into contact with each other through the agency of Mongols in Central Asia, Arabs in the Mediterranean, and the Indian Ocean, Indic, and Sinic societies in South East Asia, and the Europeans through their travels and colonial expansion. The concluding section concerns contemporary issues: the processes of decolonization, neo-colonialism, and globalization — and their consequences on contemporary society.

Subject:
World History
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Erik Ringmar
Date Added:
05/13/2020
Human Rights in World History (HIST 1810)
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Course DescriptionHuman rights, an idea that has come to mean a set of core practices and values that society believes are inherent to each and every individual, was not a construct that sprang from a vacuum. In this course we will address the development of the term human rights, from ancient times through to the present day. As a class, we will focus on the religious, moral, and social implications of believing in such inalienable rights, the development of the concept of individual rights and responsibilities, the conflicts and complications that made contemporary human rights what they, and the 20th and 21st century struggles that have pushed human rights near to a breaking point.As a history course covering a single topic on a global scale, this course will entail a significant amount of reading, and will focus on the tools and practices necessary for successful comprehension of historical materials, both in the primary and secondary form. Through this class, students will learn to differentiate between primary and secondary historical sources, successfully deconstruct both sets of materials, and understand how to summarize and integrate individual sources with the larger historical narrative of human rights. Finally, this course will rely solely on Open-Source Educational Materials, grounding the importance of the democratization of knowledge.

Subject:
World Cultures
History
World History
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Elizabeth Manley
Date Added:
05/31/2019
Imperial and Revolutionary Russia: Culture and Politics, 1700-1917, Fall 2019
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This course analyzes Russia's social, cultural, and political heritage in the 18th and 19th centuries, up to and including the Russian Revolution of 1917. It compares reforming and revolutionary impulses in the context of serfdom, the rise of the intelligentsia, and debates over capitalism. It focuses on historical and literary texts, especially the intersections between the two.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Elizabeth A. Wood
Date Added:
01/01/2012
Islam, The Middle East, and The West
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This course will introduce the student to the history of the Middle East from the rise of Islam to the twenty-first century. The course will emphasize the encounters and exchanges between the Islamic world and the West. By the end of the course, the student will understand how Islam became a sophisticated and far-reaching civilization and how conflicts with the West shaped the development of the Middle East from the medieval period to the present day. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify and describe the nature of pre-Islamic society, culture, and religion. They will also be able to describe the subsequent rise of the prophet Muhammad and his monotheistic religion, Islam; identify and describe the elements of Islamic law, religious texts and practices, and belief systems; identify and describe the rise of the Umayyad and Abbasid dynasties in the Middle East. Students will also be able to compare and contrast the two empires; identify and describe the emergence of the Umayyad dynasty in Spain. Students will also be able to analyze the conflicts between Muslims and Christians on the Iberian Peninsula; identify and describe the Crusades. They will be able to describe both Muslim and Christian perceptions of the holy wars; identify and describe the impact of the Mongol invasions on the Middle East; compare and contrast the Ottoman and Safavid empires; analyze the decline of the Ottoman Empire and the beginning of European imperialism/domination of the Middle East in the 1800s; identify and describe how and why European powers garnered increased spheres of influence after the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and the end of World War I; analyze and describe the rise of resistance and independence movements in the Middle East; identify and describe the rise of Islamic nationalism and the emergence of violent anti-Western sentiment; analyze (and synthesize) the relationship between the Middle East and the West between the 600s and the present day; analyze and interpret primary source documents that elucidate the exchanges and conflicts between the Islamic world and the West over time. (History 351)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Religious Studies
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
02/20/2019
Israel: History, Politics, Culture, and Identity, Spring 2019
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This course examines Israeli identity using a broad array of materials, including popular music, film, documentaries, and art, in addition to academic historical writings. Topics include Israel's political system and society, ethnic relations, settlement projects, and the Arab minorities in the Jewish state. Students also discuss whether there is a unique Israeli culture and the struggle for Israel's identity.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
World History
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Eiran, Ehud
Date Added:
01/01/2019
Jewish History from Biblical to Modern Times, Fall 2007
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"This course explores how our views of Jewish history have been formed and how this history can explain the survival of the Jews as an ethnic/religious group into the present day. Special attention is given to the partial and fragmentary nature of our information about the past, and the difficulties inherent in decoding statements about the past that were written with a religious agenda in mind. It also considers complex events in Jewish history -- from early history as portrayed in the Bible to recent history, including the Holocaust."

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Temin, Peter
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Making the Modern World: The Industrial Revolution in Global Perspective, Fall 2009
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This class is a global survey of the great transformation in history known as the "Industrial Revolution." Topics include origins of mechanized production, the factory system, steam propulsion, electrification, mass communications, mass production and automation. Emphasis on the transfer of technology and its many adaptations around the world. Countries treated include Great Britain, France, Germany, the US, Sweden, Russia, Japan, China, and India. Includes brief reflection papers and a final paper.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Smith, Merritt Roe
Date Added:
01/01/2011
The Middle East in the 20th Century, Fall 2015
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This course surveys the history of the Middle East, from the end of the 19th century to the present. It examines major political, social, intellectual and cultural issues and practices. It also focuses on important events, movements, and ideas that prevailed during the last century and affect its current realities.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Abigail Jacobson
Date Added:
01/01/2015
Modern Latin America, 1808-Present: Revolution, Dictatorship, Democracy, Spring 2005
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Selective survey of Latin American history from the wars of independence at the start of the nineteenth century to the present. Issues studied include: independence and its aftermath, slavery and its abolition, Latin America in the global economy, relations between Latin America and the US, dictatorships and democracies in the twentieth century, and revolution in Mexico, Cuba, and Central America.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ravel, Jeffrey
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Modern Latin and South America
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CC BY
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This course will introduce the student to the history of Latin and South America from the early 19th century, when many Latin and South American colonies declared their independence from European rule, to the present day. The student will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place throughout Latin and South America during this 200-year period, such as efforts by independent Latin and South American nations to create stable economies in the 19th century, political and economic conflicts between independent states and European imperial powers, the emergence of violent left-wing and right-wing political and social movements in the 20th century, and the developmental challenges that many Latin and South American nations face today. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Analyze and interpret primary source documents from the 19th and 20th centuries using historical research methods; Think critically about the history of Latin and South America from the 19th century to the present; Analyze how the peoples of Latin and South America attempted to organize viable nation-states following independence from Spanish and Portuguese colonial rule; Assess how the United States used economic imperialism to control the economic and political development of the nations of Latin and South America; Identify the origins of the 1910 Mexican Revolution and assess the political, economic, and social impact of the revolution for the people of Mexico; Assess the role that Latin and South American nations played in the global economy in the 19th and 20th centuries; Analyze the role that cultural agents such as the Catholic Church played in the development of Latin and South American nations; Identify the role played by women, indigenous peoples, and Afro-Latinos in the social and political development of Latin and South America; Identify the political and economic factors that led to the emergence of political dictatorships in many Latin and South American nations in the early 20th century; Assess how Cold War struggles between capitalist and Communist ideologies influenced political life in the nations of Latin and South America and led to the rise of repressive, authoritarian regimes in the 1970s and 1980s; Identify important contemporary political, economic, and social trends in Latin and South America based on an analysis of the region's history; Analyze and interpret primary source documents from the 19th and 20th centuries using historical research methods. (History 222)

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
02/20/2019
Modern Middle East and Southwest Asia
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This course will introduce the student to the history of the nations and peoples of the Middle East and Southwest Asia from 1919 to the present. The course covers the major political, economic, and social changes that took place throughout the region during this 100-year period. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify and explain major political, social and economic trends, events, and people in history of the Middle East and Southwest Asia from the beginning of the 20th century to the present; Explain how the countries of the region have overcome significant social, economic, and political problems as they have grown from weak former colonies into modern nation-states; Identify and explain the emergence of nationalist movements following World War I, European political and economic imperialism during the first half of the 20th century, the creation of the nation of Israel, regional economic development, and the impact of secular and religious trends on Middle Eastern society and culture during the second half of the 20th century; Identify and explain the important economic, political, and social developments in the Middle East and Southwest Asia during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries; Analyze and interpret primary source documents from the 20th and 21st centuries that illustrate important overarching political, economic, and social themes. (History 232)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Religious Studies
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
02/20/2019
Modern Northeast Asia
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Study of the history of East Asia (China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam) from the 19th century to the present. Analyzes the impact of European imperialism, Communism, and the creation of modern nation-states.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
02/20/2019
Modern World History
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Table of Contents:

1. Modern World History Begins in Asia
2. Europe and Africa
3. The Americas and Columbus
4. Early Globalization and Revolutions
5. Troubled Nineteenth Century
6. Imperialism
7. The Great War
8. Modern Crisis
9. World War II
10. Decolonization
11. Cold War
12. Neoliberal Globalization
13. Limits to Growth?
14. Appendix A: Choosing a Chief Executive and Voting
15. Appendix B: Finance and Taxes

Access also available: https://mlpp.pressbooks.pub/modernworldhistory/

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Dan Allosso
Tom Williford
Date Added:
01/14/2021
Modern World History since 1500 (complete course)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This resource includes everything needed to teach a modern world civilization course (AP or college level): a detailed syllabus, taped lectures, a primary source reader, and a PowerPoint.

Subject:
World Cultures
World Civilization
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Primary Source
Syllabus
Author:
Philippe Girard
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Monarchs, People, and History, Summer 2008
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CC BY-NC-SA
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The origins and reasons for monarchy as an institution and social force in the Western world. Specific royal personages are studied with attention to how they attained or lost effectiveness as leaders; their goals for themselves and their people are stressed. These themes are explored through primary source readings. Architectural, artistic, and musical evidence are introduced in slide and tape sessions.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Provider:
UMass Boston
Provider Set:
UMass Boston OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ph.D.
Professor Aidan Breen
Date Added:
04/25/2019
The New Spain:1977-2015
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In this class we will come to understand the vast changes in Spanish life that have taken place since Franco's death in 1975. We will focus on the new freedom from censorship, the re-emergence of movements for regional autonomy, the new cinema, reforms in education and changes in daily life: Sex roles, work, and family that have occurred in the last decade. In so doing, we will examine myths that are often considered commonplaces when describing Spain and its people.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Margery Resnick
Date Added:
01/01/2015
Nineteenth Century Europe
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This course covers the political, social and cultural history of Europe from 1815 to 1900, including the history of each major European nation.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
UMass Boston
Provider Set:
UMass Boston OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ph.D.
Professor Spencer Di Scala
Date Added:
04/25/2019
Oil: International Evolution
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Have you purchased gasoline and wondered at the price changes? Or worn your polyester jacket and wondered how it kept you warm, or been thankful your phone didn't break when you dropped it? These are just some benefits the petroleum industry brings to our world. Other aspects to the global world market involve natural disasters, wars, rumors of wars, national security, and consumer demand. Learn about oil production and how nations respond as EGEE 120 gives you a foundation of how industry interacts with you, governments, transportation, politics, and the world. You will become a more informed citizen, able to support your opinion about oil and the environment. As John McCain said, \Whoever controls oil controls much more than oil.\"

Subject:
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State University
Provider Set:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http:// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Karen Hagemeier Jensen
Yaw Yeboah"
Date Added:
04/25/2019
An Outline History of East Asia to 1200
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This open access textbook arose out of a course at the University of California, San Diego, called HILD 10: East Asia: The Great Tradition. The course covers what have become two Chinas, Japan, and two Koreas from roughly 1200 BC to about AD 1200. As we say every Fall in HILD 10: “2400 years, three countries, ten weeks, no problem.” The book does not stand alone: the teacher should assign primary and secondary sources, study questions, dates to be memorized, etc. The maps mostly use the same template to enable students to compare them one to the next.

Table of Contents
Chapter One East Asia to 1045 BC
Chapter Two The Zhou Period (1045 – 256 BC)
Chapter Three From Warring States Two Empire (480 BC -207 BC)
Chapter Four The Han Empire and Its Neighbors
Chapter Five Religion and Society in Han (206 BC – AD 220)
Chapter Six A World of Many Powers (AD 200 – AD 580
Chapter Seven Consolidating Unified Regimes (c. 500-780)
Chapter Eight Aristocratic Societies 1: Tang and Silla
Chapter Nine Aristocratic Societies 2: Hei’an Japan
Chapter Ten The Commercial Revolution

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Sarah Schneewind
UC San Diego
Date Added:
04/27/2021
Pre-Modern Northeast Asia
Unrestricted Use
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This course introduces the history of East Asia from the early Yellow River civilizations to the Qing Dynasty in the late eighteenth century. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: compare the philosophical schools of thought that influenced the political and religious development of East Asia to the eighteenth century; identify the common educational and cultural sources that have served as the foundation of multiple Chinese political dynasties; compare the development of societies in China, Vietnam, Korea, and Japan since 1500 B.C.E.; differentiate between decentralized and centralized authority in the political history of China, Japan, and Korea by comparing governing bodies that range from clans to kingdoms to dynastic empires; describe the interactions between Europeans and rulers in China and Japan and the eventual isolationist policies that develop in East Asia; identify the key technological innovations in East Asian societies that transformed the political systems and social hierarchy of the region; analyze and contextualize a selection of East Asian literary and artistic works including objects of material culture. This free course may be completed online at any time. (History 241)

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
02/20/2019
Remix
Review of Boundless World History
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Review of:  Boundless World History (https://www.oercommons.org/courses/boundless-world-history/view and https://louis.oercommons.org/courses/boundless-world-history-world-history-textbook)Reviewed by Philippe Girard, McNeese State Universitywo

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Philippe Girard
Date Added:
08/07/2020