Philosophy

An introduction to the major issues and ideas developed throughout the history of philosophy.

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General Philosophy Lectures
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A series of lectures delivered by Peter Millican to first-year philosophy students at the University of Oxford. The lectures comprise of the 8-week General Philosophy course, delivered to first year undergraduates. These lectures aim to provide a thorough introduction to many philosophical topics and to get students and others interested in thinking about key areas of philosophy. Taking a chronological view of the history of philosophy, each lecture is split into 3 or 4 sections which outline a particular philosophical problem and how different philosophers have attempted to resolve the issue. Individuals interested in the 'big' questions about life such as how we perceive the world, who we are in the world and whether we are free to act will find this series informative, comprehensive and accessible.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Provider:
University of Oxford
Provider Set:
University of Oxford Podcasts
Author:
Peter Millican
Date Added:
02/19/2010
An Introduction to Philosophy
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The goal of this text is to present philosophy to newcomers as a living discipline with historical roots. While a few early chapters are historically organized, my goal in the historical chapters is to trace a developmental progression of thought that introduces basic philosophical methods and frames issues that remain relevant today. Later chapters are topically organized. These include philosophy of science and philosophy of mind, areas where philosophy has shown dramatic recent progress. This text concludes with four chapters on ethics, broadly construed. I cover traditional theories of right action in the third of these. Students are first invited first to think about what is good for themselves and their relationships in a chapter of love and happiness. Next a few meta-ethical issues are considered; namely, whether they are moral truths and if so what makes them so. The end of the ethics sequence addresses social justice, what it is for one’s community to be good. Our sphere of concern expands progressively through these chapters. Our inquiry recapitulates the course of development into moral maturity

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Bellevue College
Author:
W. Russ Payne
Date Added:
04/24/2019
Introduction to Philosophy
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This course introduces students to the major topics, problems, and methods of philosophy and surveys the writings of a number of major historical figures in the field. Several of the core areas of philosophy are explored, including metaphysics, epistemology, political philosophy, ethics, and the philosophy of religion. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Identify and describe the major areas of philosophical inquiry, explain how those areas differ from and relate to one another, and place the views and arguments of major philosophical figures within those thematic categories; Use philosophical terminology correctly and consistently; Identify and describe the views of a number of major philosophers and articulate how these views are created in response to general philosophical problems or to the views of other philosophers; Explain the broad outlines of the history of philosophy as a framework that can be applied in more advanced courses; Identify strengths and weaknesses in the arguments philosophers have put forward for their views and formulate objections and counterarguments of your own invention; Apply critical thinking and reasoning skills in a wide range of career paths and courses of study. (Philosophy 101)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Introduction to Philosophy
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Lumen Learning Introduction to Philosophy course covers Nature of Philosophy, Logic, Ethics, Metaphysics and Epistemology, and Philosophy of Religion.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Reading
Date Added:
09/04/2019
Introduction to Philosophy
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Table of Contents:

Chapter 1: External world skepticism
The problem of external world skepticism
Chapter 2: The problem of other minds
The problem of other minds
Chapter 3: The mind-body problem
The mind-body problem
Chapter 4: Personal identity
Personal identity
Chapter 5: The problem of free will and determinism
The problem of free will and determinism
Free will supplement: Quantum indeterminacy and the Libet experiments
Free will supplement: Libertarianism and dualism
Chapter 6: Philosophy of religion
Philosophy of Religion
Chapter 7: The ethics of belief
Pragmatic arguments and the ethics of belief
Chapter 8: Human well-being
Human well-being
Chapter 9: Post-modernism
What is Postmodernism?
Chapter 10: Property
The Nature of Property
Chapter 11: Capitalism, Communism, & Bernie Sanders
Capitalism, Communism & Bernie Sanders
Chapter 12: Buddhism
Dhamma: What the Buddha Taught
Chapter 13: Aesthetics
Issues in Aesthetics: How to Judge Art?

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Christopher Schneck
Douglas Sjoquist
Matthew Van Cleave
Paul Jurczak
Date Added:
09/21/2021
Introduction to Philosophy: Philosophy of Mind
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Introduction to Philosophy: Philosophy of Mind surveys the central themes in philosophy of mind and places them in a historical and contemporary context intended to engage first-time readers in the field. It focuses on debates about the status and character of the mind and its seemingly subjective nature in an apparently more objective world. Join the discussion for this and other books in the Introduction to Philosophy open textbook series!

1. Substance Dualism in Descartes
2. Materialism and Behaviorism
3. Functionalism
4. Property Dualism
5. Qualia and Raw Feels
6. Consciousness
7. Concepts and Content
8. Freedom of the Will

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Christina Hendricks
Daniel Haas
Elly Vintiadis
Eran Asoulin
Heather Salazar
Henry Shevlin
Jason Newman
Paul Richard Blum
Tony Cheng
Date Added:
02/11/2020
Modern Philosophy
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This is a textbook (or better, a workbook) in modern philosophy. It combines readings from primary sources with two pedagogical tools. Paragraphs in italics introduce figures and texts. Numbered study questions (also in italics) ask students to reconstruct an argument or position from the text, or draw connections among the readings. And I have added an introductory chapter (Chapter 0 – Minilogic and Glossary), designed to present the basic tools of philosophy and sketch some principles and positions. The immediate goal is to encourage students to grapple with the ideas rather than passing their eyes over the texts. This makes for a better classroom experience and permits higher-level discussions. Another goal is to encourage collaboration among instructors, as they revise and post their own versions of the book.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
BCcampus
Provider Set:
BCcampus Faculty Reviewed Open Textbooks
Author:
Alexander
Dunn
Ott
Walter
Date Added:
02/06/2015
Philosophy 101 Readings
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Table of Contents:

Module 1: Plato “The Republic”
Book 6
Book 7

Module 3: Aristotle
Physics Book 2 (part 1)
Metaphysics Book 2 (part 1, 2, 7, 8, 9)
Nichomachean Ethics Book 2 (part 6, 7, 8, 9)

Module 4: Religion
Hebrew Bible
Qur’an

Module 5 Descartes
First Meditation
Second Meditation

Module 6: Locke & Rousseau
An Essay Concerning Human Understanding
The Social Contract

Module 7: Kant & Nietzsche
Kant: Prolegomena
Nietzsche: The Anti-Christ

Module 8: Mill & MLK
Mill “On Liberty”
Letter from Birmingham Jail

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Author:
Cathy Hagman
Glen Nesse
Date Added:
07/06/2021
Words of Wisdom: Intro to Philosophy
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Words of Wisdom can come from anyone. In this text we discuss topics ranging from "Are Humans good by nature?" to "Is there a God?" to "Do I have the right to my own opinion?" Philosophy is the study of wisdom, and can emerge in our conversations in places like social media, in school, around the family dinner table, and even in the car. The text uses materials that are 2,500 years old, and materials that were in the news this year. Wise people come in all shapes and types, and from every culture on earth. We have poetry and folktales, sacred writings and letters. Dialogues and interviews, news columns, podcasts, Ted Talks, You Tube recordings and even comedy are all a part of the content in this text.You will be most successful using this collection this on line.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Jody Ondich
Date Added:
01/01/2018