Fiction, Poetry and Drama

Introduction to fiction, poetry and/or drama; includes critical analysis and writing about fiction, poetry and/or drama.

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Approaching Prose Fiction
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Do you want to get more out of your reading? This unit is designed to develop the analytical skills you need for a more in-depth study of literary texts. You will learn about narrative events and perspectives, the setting of novels, types of characterisation and genre.

Subject:
Literature and Composition
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Open University
Provider Set:
Open University OpenLearn
Date Added:
09/06/2007
Introduction to Drama
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Introduction to Drama combines the literary arts of storytelling and poetry with the world of live performance. As a form of ritual as well as entertainment, drama has served to unite communities and challenge social norms, to vitalize and disturb its audiences. In order to understand this rich art form more fully, we will study and discuss a sampling of plays that exemplify different kinds of dramatic structure; class members will also participate in, attend, and review dramatic performances.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Henderson Diana
Prof Diana Henderson
Date Added:
07/29/2019
Introduction to Fiction, Fall 2003
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Introduces prose narrative, both short stories and the novel. Examines the construction of narrative and the analysis of literary response. This course investigates the uses and boundaries of fiction in a range of novels and narrative styles--traditional and innovative, western and nonwestern--and raises questions about the pleasures and meanings of verbal texts in different cultures, times, and forms. Toward the end of the term, we will be particularly concerned with the relationship between art and war in a diverse selection of works.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kelley, Wyn
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Introduction to Poetry and/or Drama Materials
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This course is designed as a basic introduction to poetry and/or drama. All resources are in the public domain, or they may be accessed through student/faculty searching sites like poetryfoundation.org. The linked resources are also public domain.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
LOUIS: The Louisiana Library Network
Author:
Michael Rather
Date Added:
03/11/2021
Introduction to drama
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This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file.

As taught in Autumn Semester 2010.

This module is designed to provide an introduction to the analysis and performance of drama. It has three main aims:

1) To provide an introduction to the analysis of drama;
2) To give a taste of the wide range of performance convention in history, from Ancient Greek tragedy to nineteenth-century naturalism;
3) To foreground drama as a performance medium rather than a form of literature.

At Nottingham, we approach drama as a performance medium: an event within a specific time, space and locale, in which real people and objects are presented to other people in real, shared space. It is always a social event, so we learn to think about the people who do the performing, the place they perform in, and the people they perform to. Written texts may be looked at as much for information about the modes and places of performance as for what they represent or ‘say’. It is to be understood that the space itself and the mode of performing in it create meaning as much as do pre-scripted words.

We emphasise the fact that performance analysis is not literary criticism, and that play scripts should not be read simply as texts. The interpretation and analysis of drama requires different skills. The seminars on the module will provide opportunities for you to develop these skills yourself, while the lectures are designed to provide you with the kind of information necessary for an analysis of performance as an event in real historical time and space.

The module also aims to introduce a range of historical examples of theatre practice, drawn from several different moments in theatre history. The lectures will explore what we know about the performance conventions of Greek tragedy, medieval religious plays, Shakespeare's plays and Restoration/Augustan comedy, turning lastly to the arrival of naturalism as an approach to performance in the late nineteenth century.

Finally, we believe that a seminal way of learning to understand how theatre works is getting involved in performance itself. The workshops held in the Autumn semester provide structured opportunities to discuss the kind of decisions that are taken when a script is realised on stage and to experience the practical consequences of a theatre director’s decision making. More information on the format of workshops is provided below.

Suitable for study at undergraduate level 1.

Dr James Moran, School of English Studies.

Dr Moran's research is primarily concerned with modern drama. His monograph Staging the Easter Rising (2005) explores the connections between literature and politics, and was reviewed as 'a brave, confident book' in the Times Literary Supplement and as a 'terrific read' in the Irish Times. He also edited Four Irish Rebel Plays (2007), a volume described as 'fascinating' by Books Ireland and by Studies in Theatre and Performance. His latest monograph, Irish Birmingham: A History (2010), has been published by Liverpool University Press and reviewed as follows in the Irish Times: 'Even if you have no ties with Birmingham, if you are interested in culture or history, you'll enjoy Irish Birmingham: A History...Moran is a splendid writer, and a very engaging one'.

Dr Moran is currently Head of Drama at the University of Nottingham.

Subject:
Literature and Composition
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr James Moran
Date Added:
03/24/2017
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Intro to Fiction, Fall 2003
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This is a review of MIT Introduction to Fiction, Fall 2003 course: https://louis.oercommons.org/courses/21l-003-introduction-to-fiction-fall-2003 completed by Ginger Jones, Professor of English LSU AlexandriaThis rubric was developed by BCcampus. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.The rubric allows reviewers to evaluate OER textbooks using a consistent set of criteria. Reviewers are encouraged to remix this rubric and add their review content within this tool. If you remix this rubric for an evaluation, please add the title to the evaluated content and link to it from your review.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Ginger Jones, Ph.D.
Date Added:
07/14/2020
Intro to Fiction OER Course
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This is a class designed to get to the heart of fiction by starting with the simplest of myths, moving into short stories, and finally finishing with a novel.

We'll look at the beginning origins of the tale and see how it slowly grew from being something largely contained in plot devices to being something more attuned to character studies before finally showing you how bonkers some fiction can be.

Many elements of our world will be played with and looked at through different view points in an attempt to stir something in the student. As Kafka said, "A book must be an axe for the frozen sea within us."

We'll look at how the short story isn't so much different or a new thing, but is often the one most overlooked. People celebrate poems and Shakespearean plays, and the greatest novels of the time, as they should...but too often we overlook the brilliance of the short story, yet...for many of us, it is the preferred style to enjoy. And in many ways, it is just a poem in prose form, and as Poe said, it was intended to create a trance-like state, "an exaltation of the soul which cannot be long sustained."

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
LOUIS: The Louisiana Library Network
Author:
Michael Rather
Date Added:
03/11/2021
Literary Form and Analysis: Instructional Materials for English 300
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This OER packet comprises instructional materials used for ENG 300: Literary Forms and Analysis, a "gateway" course for the English major and minor at Portland State University. It includes handouts, exercises, and a sample syllabus for this course, emphasizing skills of "close reading" and formal analysis, as well as the scholarly study of genre (poetry, fiction, drama, and film). The syllabus and handouts offered in this packet represent only one of many possible approaches to ENG 300. These open access, freely available resources that can be readily adjusted to suit different pedagogical methods. They can also be usefully complemented with additional information about academic writing, argumentation, and the writing process (which, though the primary focus of Portland State University's second "gateway" course for majors, WR 301: Critical Writing and English, can be addressed in ENG 300 at varying levels of depth). or materials. The materials here can be combined with any selection of literary texts.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Josh Epstein
Portland State University
Date Added:
01/19/2021
Literary Interpretation: Interpreting Poetry, Fall 2003
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Introduces practice and theory of literary criticism. Seminar focuses on topics such as the history of critical methods and techniques, and the continuity of certain subjects in literary history. Instruction and practice in oral and written communication. Topic: Theory and Use of Figurative Language. This seminar offers a course of readings in lyric poetry. It aims to enhance the student's capacity to understand the nature of poetic language and the enjoyment of poetic texts by treating poems as messages to be deciphered. The seminar will briefly touch upon the history of theories of figurative language since Aristotle and it will attend to the development of those theories during the last thirty years, noting the manner in which they tended to consider figures of speech distinct from normative or literal expression, and it will devote particular attention to the rise of theories that quarrel with this distinction. The seminar also aims to communicate a rough sense of the history of English-speaking poetry since the early modern period. Some attention will be paid as well to the use of metaphor in science.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kibel, Alvin C.
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Major Poets, Fall 2005
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Emphasis on the analytical reading of lyric poetry in England and the United States. Syllabus usually includes Shakespeare's sonnets, Donne, Keats, Dickinson, Frost, Eliot, Marianne Moore, Lowell, Rich, and Bishop. This subject is an introduction to poetry as a genre; most of our texts are originally written in English. We read poems from the Renaissance through the 17th and 18th centuries, Romanticism, and Modernism. Focus will be on analytic reading, on literary history, and on the development of the genre and its forms; in writing we attend to techniques of persuasion and of honest evidenced sequential argumentation. Poets to be read will include William Shakespeare, Queen Elizabeth, William Wordsworth, John Keats, T.S. Eliot, Langston Hughes, Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, and some contemporary writers.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Tapscott, Stephen
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Reading Poetry, Spring 2018
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How do you read a poem? Intuition is not the only answer. In this class, we will investigate some of the formal tools poets use—meter, sound, syntax, word-choice, and other properties of language—as well as exploring a range of approaches to reading poetry, from the old (memorization and reading out loud) to the new (digitally enabled visualization and annotation). We will use readings available online via the generosity of the Poetry Foundation and the Academy of American Poets. We will also think collectively about how to approach difficult poems.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Mary Fuller
Date Added:
04/25/2019
Studies in Poetry: Does Poetry Matter, Fall 2002
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Extensive reading of works by a few major poets. Emphasizes the evolution of each poet's work and the questions of poetic influence and literary tradition. Instruction and practice in oral and written communication. Topic for Fall: Does Poetry Matter? Topic for Spring: Gender and Lyric Poetry. From the course home page Course Description The landscape we will explore is the troublesome one of the relevance, impact, and importance of poetry in a troubled modern world. We will read both poetry and prose by several substantial modern writers, each of whom confronted the question that is the subject's title.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Hildebidle, John
Date Added:
01/01/2002
Syllabus for English 2303
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This is a syllbus for English 2031 (Introduction to the Novel) at LSU Alexandria, which is course English 2303 on the statewide common course matrix. https://louis.oercommons.org/editor/documents/620

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Ginger Jones, Ph.D.
Date Added:
07/27/2020
Writing and Critical Thinking Through Literature
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This text offers instruction in analytical, critical, and argumentative writing, critical thinking, research strategies, information literacy, and proper documentation through the study of literary works from major genres, while developing students’ close reading skills and promoting an appreciation of the aesthetic qualities of literature. A culturally responsive OER text incorporating primary literary sources and explanatory materials that would also include ancillary materials such as assignments and essay prompts.

1: Introduction
2: About Creative Nonfiction
3: Creative Nonfiction Readings
4: About Fiction - Short Stories and the Novel
5: Fiction Readings
6: About Poetry
7: Poetry Readings
8: About Drama
9: Drama Readings
10: About Literary Criticism
11: Literary Criticism Readings
12: Writing About Literature
13: Citations and Formatting Guide for Literature (MLA)
14: Literary Devices Glossary

Subject:
Literature and Composition
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Athena Kashyap
Heather Ringo
Date Added:
07/09/2020