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German stage 2 semester A
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This module is aimed post GCSE students in semester A and addresses common grammatical problems areas. The grammar exercises are also supported by audio, so that the pronunciation is underlined and listening skills are practiced. The transcript reader of the listening exercises allows students to identify words/passages they find difficult to understand.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Interactive
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Date Added:
03/24/2017
Immunology basics
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This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file.

As taught Autumn semester 2009.

Infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The body fights infection through the functions of the immune system, whose power has been harnessed by the development of vaccination (immunisation).

Suitable for study at: Undergraduate levels 1 and 2.

Dr Ian Todd, School of Molecular Medical Sciences.

Dr Ian Todd is Associate Professor & Reader in Cellular Immunopathology at The University of Nottingham. After reading Biochemistry at The University of Oxford, he carried out research for his PhD in Immunology at University College London. He then undertook post-doctoral research at The Oregon Health Sciences University and The Middlesex Hospital Medical School. His main research interest is in the molecular and cellular bases of autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases. He is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and a recipient of the Lord Dearing Award for Teaching & Learning.

Important Copyright Information:

All images, tables and figures in this resource were reproduced from 'Lecture Notes Immunology' April 2010, 6th Edition, published by Wiley-Blackwell and with full permission of the co-author and faculty member, Dr Ian Todd.

No image, table or figure in this resource can be reproduced without prior permission from publishers Wiley-Blackwell.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Ian Todd
Date Added:
03/24/2017
Introduction to drama
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This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file.

As taught in Autumn Semester 2010.

This module is designed to provide an introduction to the analysis and performance of drama. It has three main aims:

1) To provide an introduction to the analysis of drama;
2) To give a taste of the wide range of performance convention in history, from Ancient Greek tragedy to nineteenth-century naturalism;
3) To foreground drama as a performance medium rather than a form of literature.

At Nottingham, we approach drama as a performance medium: an event within a specific time, space and locale, in which real people and objects are presented to other people in real, shared space. It is always a social event, so we learn to think about the people who do the performing, the place they perform in, and the people they perform to. Written texts may be looked at as much for information about the modes and places of performance as for what they represent or ‘say’. It is to be understood that the space itself and the mode of performing in it create meaning as much as do pre-scripted words.

We emphasise the fact that performance analysis is not literary criticism, and that play scripts should not be read simply as texts. The interpretation and analysis of drama requires different skills. The seminars on the module will provide opportunities for you to develop these skills yourself, while the lectures are designed to provide you with the kind of information necessary for an analysis of performance as an event in real historical time and space.

The module also aims to introduce a range of historical examples of theatre practice, drawn from several different moments in theatre history. The lectures will explore what we know about the performance conventions of Greek tragedy, medieval religious plays, Shakespeare's plays and Restoration/Augustan comedy, turning lastly to the arrival of naturalism as an approach to performance in the late nineteenth century.

Finally, we believe that a seminal way of learning to understand how theatre works is getting involved in performance itself. The workshops held in the Autumn semester provide structured opportunities to discuss the kind of decisions that are taken when a script is realised on stage and to experience the practical consequences of a theatre director’s decision making. More information on the format of workshops is provided below.

Suitable for study at undergraduate level 1.

Dr James Moran, School of English Studies.

Dr Moran's research is primarily concerned with modern drama. His monograph Staging the Easter Rising (2005) explores the connections between literature and politics, and was reviewed as 'a brave, confident book' in the Times Literary Supplement and as a 'terrific read' in the Irish Times. He also edited Four Irish Rebel Plays (2007), a volume described as 'fascinating' by Books Ireland and by Studies in Theatre and Performance. His latest monograph, Irish Birmingham: A History (2010), has been published by Liverpool University Press and reviewed as follows in the Irish Times: 'Even if you have no ties with Birmingham, if you are interested in culture or history, you'll enjoy Irish Birmingham: A History...Moran is a splendid writer, and a very engaging one'.

Dr Moran is currently Head of Drama at the University of Nottingham.

Subject:
Literature and Composition
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr James Moran
Date Added:
03/24/2017
The sounds of German
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This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file.

As taught in Autumn Semester 2009.

This module investigates the sounds of German and how they can be described accurately (“phonetics and phonology”). Students will learn to transcribe German using the notation of the International Phonetic Association, and we will look in particular at aspects of German pronunciation that are hard to master because they are different to English or similar to French. We will also look at how foreign words (including English words) are integrated into the German sound system, and at regional variation in spoken German. Practical transcription skills will form a major part of coursework, including one of the two assignments.

Suitable for study at undergraduate level 1.

Dr Nicola McLelland, School of Modern Languages and Culture.

Dr McLelland studied German and French at the University of Sydney, Australia, where, after studying for two years in Bonn, Germany, also gained a PhD in medieval German literature. After an MPhil in linguistics at the University of Cambridge Dr McLelland developed her current interest in the history of people's ideas and beliefs about language, especially German.

Dr McLelland has three main research areas: i. the history of linguistic ideas, especially the history of German grammar-writing, and the history how German has been presented to English learners of it; ii. contemporary sociolinguistic theory as applied to German and to other Germanic languages; iii. narrative techniques in medieval German literature, especially in Ulrich von Zatzikhoven's Lanzelet.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Nicola McLelland
Date Added:
03/27/2017