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  • Molecular Biology
Basic Cell and Molecular Biology: What We Know & How We Found Out
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Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Cell Tour, Life’s Properties and Evolution, Studying Cells
Chapter 2: Basic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry
Chapter 3: Details of Protein Structure
Chapter 4: Bioenergetics
Chapter 5: Enzyme Catalysis and Kinetics
Chapter 6: Glycolysis, the Krebs Cycle and the Atkins Diet
Chapter 7: Electron Transport, Oxidative Phosphorylation and Photosynthesis
Chapter 8: DNA Structure, Chromosomes and Chromatin
Chapter 9: Details of DNA Replication & DNA Repair
Chapter 10: Transcription and RNA Processing
Chapter 11: The Genetic Code and Translation
Chapter 12: Regulation of Transcription and Epigenetic Inheritance
Chapter 13: Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Gene Expression
Chapter 14: Repetitive DNA, A Eukaryotic Genomic Phenomenon
Chapter 15: DNA Technologies
Chapter 16: Membrane Structure
Chapter 17: Membrane Function
Chapter 18: The Cytoskeleton and Cell Motility
Chapter 19: Cell Division and the Cell Cycle
Chapter 20: The Origins of Life

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Gerald Bergtrom
Date Added:
06/19/2020
Biological Computing: At the Crossroads of Engineering and Science, Spring 2005
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Imagine you are a salesman needing to visit 100 cities connected by a set of roads. Can you do it while stopping in each city only once? Even a supercomputer working at 1 trillion operations per second would take longer than the age of the universe to find a solution when considering each possibility in turn. In 1994, Leonard Adleman published a paper in which he described a solution, using the tools of molecular biology, for a smaller 7-city example of this problem. His paper generated enormous scientific and public interest, and kick-started the field of Biological Computing, the main subject of this discussion based seminar course. Students will analyze the Adleman paper, and the papers that preceded and followed it, with an eye for identifying the engineering and scientific aspects of each paper, emphasizing the interplay of these two approaches in the field of Biological Computing. This course is appropriate for both biology and non-biology majors. Care will be taken to fill in any knowledge gaps for both scientists and engineers.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Khodor, Julia
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Biology 2e
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Biology 2e is designed to cover the scope and sequence requirements of a typical two-semester biology course for science majors. The text provides comprehensive coverage of foundational research and core biology concepts through an evolutionary lens. Biology includes rich features that engage students in scientific inquiry, highlight careers in the biological sciences, and offer everyday applications. The book also includes various types of practice and homework questions that help students understand—and apply—key concepts. The 2nd edition has been revised to incorporate clearer, more current, and more dynamic explanations, while maintaining the same organization as the first edition. Art and illustrations have been substantially improved, and the textbook features additional assessments and related resources.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
03/07/2018
Biology 2e, The Chemistry of Life, The Study of Life, Themes and Concepts of Biology
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By the end of this section, you will be able to do the following:

Identify and describe the properties of life
Describe the levels of organization among living things
Recognize and interpret a phylogenetic tree
List examples of different subdisciplines in biology

Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
09/20/2018
Biomedical Information Technology, Fall 2008
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" This course teaches the design of contemporary information systems for biological and medical data. Examples are chosen from biology and medicine to illustrate complete life cycle information systems, beginning with data acquisition, following to data storage and finally to retrieval and analysis. Design of appropriate databases, client-server strategies, data interchange protocols, and computational modeling architectures. Students are expected to have some familiarity with scientific application software and a basic understanding of at least one contemporary programming language (e.g. C, C++, Java, Lisp, Perl, Python). A major term project is required of all students. This subject is open to motivated seniors having a strong interest in biomedical engineering and information system design with the ability to carry out a significant independent project. This course was offered as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) program as course number SMA 5304."

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Bhowmick, Sourav Saha
Dewey Jr, C. Forbes
Yu, Hanry
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Cell and Molecular Biology: What We Know & How We Found Out
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Like most introductory science textbooks, this one opens with a discussion of scientific method. A key feature is its focus on experimental support for what we know about cell and molecular biology. Understanding how science is practiced and how investigators think about experimental results is essential to understanding the relationship of cell structure and function…, not to mention our relationship to the natural world. This is a free Open Education Resource (OER), covered by a Creative Commons CCBY license (check out the Preface!). Every chapter begins with learning objectives and links to relevant recorded lectures. As used by the author, the iText engages students with embedded “just-in-time” learning tools. These include instructor’s annotations (comments) directing students to animations or text of interest, as well as links to writing assignments and quizzes. These interactive features aim to strengthen critical thinking and writing skills necessary to understand cell and molecular biology, not to mention science as a way of thinking in general. Please excuse the marketing terms, but you can choose between Bronze, Silver, or Gold versions, reflecting increasing potential for student interaction with the iText. Download your choice of the iText or the sample chapter at one of the links below.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Lecture
Textbook
Provider:
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Provider Set:
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Digital Commons
Author:
Gerald Bergtrom
Date Added:
11/12/2019
Computational Biology
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Introduction to the use of computers to automate data analysis or model hypotheses in the field of biology, and its application for molecular and cellular biology, biochemistry, neuroscience and evolution.

Subject:
Biology
Chemistry
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Concepts of Biology / Non Majors Biology
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Bi 101-103 materials from Blue Mountain Community College, including

Engaged documentary sheets
Case Studies
Formal Lab Report
Creative writing assignment
Debates
Science Literacy
Inquiry based grant writing
Infographic review sheets
Animated videos summaries
Enhanced visualizations

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Sascha McKeon
Date Added:
07/18/2019
Experimental Molecular Neurobiology, Fall 2006
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Designed for students without previous experience in techniques of cellular and molecular biology, this class teaches basic experimental techniques in cellular and molecular neurobiology. Experimental approaches covered include tissue culture of neuronal cell lines, dissection and culture of brain cells, DNA manipulation, synaptic protein analysis, immunocytochemistry, and fluorescent microscopy.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Hayashi, Yasunori
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Fields, Forces and Flows in Biological Systems, Spring 2007
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This course introduces the basic driving forces for electric current, fluid flow, and mass transport, plus their application to a variety of biological systems. Basic mathematical and engineering tools will be introduced, in the context of biology and physiology. Various electrokinetic phenomena are also considered as an example of coupled nature of chemical-electro-mechanical driving forces. Applications include transport in biological tissues and across membranes, manipulation of cells and biomolecules, and microfluidics.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Han, Jongyoon (Jay)
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Freshman Seminar: Structural Basis of Genetic Material: Nucleic Acids, Fall 2005
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Since the discovery of the structure of the DNA double helix in 1953 by Watson and Crick, the information on detailed molecular structures of DNA and RNA, namely, the foundation of genetic material, has expanded rapidly. This discovery is the beginning of the "Big Bang" of molecular biology and biotechnology. In this seminar, students discuss, from a historical perspective and current developments, the importance of pursuing the detailed structural basis of genetic materials.

Subject:
Biology
Genetics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Zhang, Shuguang
Date Added:
01/01/2005
General Biology I
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An integrated course stressing the principles of biology. Life processes are examined primarily at the molecular and cellular levels. Intended for students majoring in biology or for non-majors who wish to take advanced biology courses.

Subject:
Biology
Genetics
Chemistry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
UMass Boston
Provider Set:
UMass Boston OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ph.D.
Professor Brian White
Date Added:
04/25/2019
General Biology II: Survey of Molecular Life and Genetics
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BI102: Survey of Molecular Life and Genetics is intended for one term of the introductory biology course for non-science majors taught at many two- and four-year colleges. The concepts of genetics, as they apply to the study of life, are introduced, including the principles of inheritance, genetics, and gene regulation.

This textbook incorporates the mandates found in Vision and Change and focuses on the non-content aspects of biology education that are just as important. Additionally, this book explicitly teaches the general education outcomes that we have identified as important for this class. This textbook pulls together biology content resources that are accessible for our community college non-major biology students, as well as resources to provide them with explicit instruction in the quantitative literacy, communication, and information literacy general education outcomes as they relate to the biology content they are learning.

Table of Contents
I. Reference Information
II. The Process of Science
III. Themes and Concepts of Biology
IV. Cell Structure and Function
V. Membranes and movement of molecules
VI. Enzyme-catalyzed reactions
VII. How cells obtain energy
VIII. Photosynthesis

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
OpenOregon
Author:
Christine Anderson
Lisa Bartee
Date Added:
01/01/2016
Introduction to Biology, Fall 2004
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The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Biology
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Though biology as we know it today is a relatively new field, we have been studying living things since the beginning of recorded history. This introductory course in biology starts at the microscopic level, with molecules and cells, then moves into the specifics of cell structure and behavior. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Describe in general terms how life began on Earth; Identify early scientists that played important roles in furthering our understanding of cellular life; Describe the characteristics that define life; List the inorganic and organic molecules that are necessary for life; List the structure and function of organelles in animal and plant cells; List the similarities and differences between animal and plant cells; Describe the reactions in photosynthesis; Explain how the different photosynthetic reactions are found in different parts of the chloroplast; Describe the sequence of photosynthetic reactions; Explain the use of products and the synthesis of reactants in photosynthesis; Explain how protein is synthesized in eukaryotic cells; Describe the similarities and differences between photosynthesis and aerobic respiration; List the reactions in aerobic respiration; Explain the use of products and the synthesis of reactants in aerobic respiration; Describe the similarities and differences between anaerobic and aerobic respiration. (Biology 101; See also: Psychology 203)

Subject:
Biology
Genetics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Biology - Laboratory
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This lab course supplements Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Biology. Although it does not replicate a true lab experience, it does enable further exploration of some key principles of molecular and cellular biology. In each unit, the student will work through tutorials related to important scientific concepts, and then will be asked to think creatively about how those concepts can be put to practical or experimental use. This lab course also contains activities devoted to learning important techniques in scientific study such as microscope use, DNA extraction, Polymerase Chain Reaction, and examination of DNA microarrays. Upon successful completion of this lab supplement, students will be able to: Identify the important components of scientific experiments and create their own experiments; Identify the molecular differences between proteins, fats, and carbohydrates, and explain the molecular behavior of water; Describe the process of photosynthesis; Describe the process of cellular respiration; Identify the differences between DNA and RNA; Describe the entire transcription/translation process, from gene to protein; Explain how recombinant genomes are formed; Use critical thinking to find ways that any of the above natural processes might be altered or manipulated; Explain how to use a compound light microscope for data collection; Explain how to conduct and use various experimental techniques, including DNA extraction, PCR, and DNA microarrays. (Biology 101 Laboratory)

Subject:
Biology
Genetics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Introductory Biology, Spring 2013
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The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. 7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer), developmental biology, neurobiology and evolution.Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized in all courses and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.  

Subject:
Education
Natural Science
Biology
Genetics
Material Type:
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Diviya Sinha
Hazel Sive
Tyler Jacks
Date Added:
01/01/2013
Molecular Biology
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After a historical introduction to molecular biology, this course describes the basic types of DNA and RNA structure and the molecular interactions that shape them. It describes how DNA is packaged within the cellular nucleus as chromosomes. It also describes the core processes of molecular biology: replication of DNA, transcription of DNA into messenger RNA, and translation of messenger RNA into a protein. These are followed by modifications of these basic processes: regulation of gene expression, DNA mutation and repair, and DNA recombination and transposition. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: discuss the experimental findings that lead to the discovery of inheritance laws; discuss the experimental findings that lead to the identification of DNA as the hereditary material; compare and contrast the structure and function of mRNA, rRNA, tRNA, and DNA; identify the characteristics of catalyzed reactions; compare and contrast enzyme and ribozyme catalyzed reactions; discuss the structure of the chromosome and the consequence of histone modifications in eukaryotes; discuss the stages of transcription, differential splicing, and RNA turnover; predict the translation product of an mRNA using the genetic code; compare and contrast transcription and translation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes; identify codon bias and variations of the standard genetic code; compare and contrast the regulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene expression; predict the activation of an operon and tissue specific gene expression based on the availability of regulators; compare and contrast mutations based on their effect on the gene product; discuss DNA repair mechanisms; discuss DNA recombination, transposition, and the consequence of exon shuffling; design custom-made recombinant DNA using PCR, restriction enzymes, and site-directed mutagenesis; compare and contrast the uses of model organisms; discuss the uses of model organisms in specific molecular biology applications. (Biology 311)

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019