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  • Milton Friedman
Justice, Spring 2012
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
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This course explores the ideal of social justice. What makes a society just? We will approach this question by studying three opposing theories of justice - utilitarianism, libertarianism, and egalitarian liberalism - each foundational to contemporary political thought and discourse.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Lucas Stanczyk
Date Added:
01/01/2012
Moral and Political Philosophy
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This course introduces students to the basic concepts and methods of moral and political philosophy. Its primary focus is on the development of moral reasoning skills and the application of those skills to contemporary social and political issues. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Discuss several major theories of justice and morality, including utilitarianism, libertarianism, social contract theory, deontology, and the ethics/politics of virtue; Demonstrate how moral and political dilemmas are handled differently by each set of theoretical principles; Develop their analytical skills through interpreting the consequences of various moral principles and revising principles to correspond with their own conceptions of justice; Discuss the relationship between morality and politics; Formulate their own positions concerning moral and political principles, especially in regards to particular issues discussed in this course; Discuss the origins of western democratic politics and constitutional government; Address a range of difficult and controversial moral and political issues, including murder, the income tax, corporate cost-benefit analysis, lying, affirmative action, and same-sex marriage. (Philosophy 103)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Principles of Macroeconomics 2e
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Principles of Macroeconomics 2e covers the scope and sequence of most introductory economics courses. The text includes many current examples, which are handled in a politically equitable way. The outcome is a balanced approach to the theory and application of economics concepts. The second edition has been thoroughly revised to increase clarity, update data and current event impacts, and incorporate the feedback from many reviewers and adopters. Changes made in Principles of Macroeconomics 2e are described in the preface and the transition guide to help instructors transition to the second edition. The first edition of Principles of Macroeconomics by OpenStax is available in web view here.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
06/29/2017
Principles of Macroeconomics 2e, Exchange Rates and International Capital Flows, Exchange Rate Policies
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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By the end of this section, you will be able to:

Differentiate among a floating exchange rate, a soft peg, a hard peg, and a merged currency
Identify the tradeoffs that come with a floating exchange rate, a soft peg, a hard peg, and a merged currency

Subject:
Applied Science
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
09/20/2018
Principles of Macroeconomics 2e, Monetary Policy and Bank Regulation, Pitfalls for Monetary Policy
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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By the end of this section, you will be able to:

Analyze whether monetary policy decisions should be made more democratically
Calculate the velocity of money
Evaluate the central bank’s influence on inflation, unemployment, asset bubbles, and leverage cycles
Calculate the effects of monetary stimulus

Subject:
Applied Science
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
09/20/2018
Principles of Macroeconomics 2e, The Neoclassical Perspective, The Policy Implications of the Neoclassical Perspective
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

By the end of this section, you will be able to:

Discuss why and how economists measure inflation expectations
Analyze the impacts of fiscal and monetary policy on aggregate supply and aggregate demand
Explain the neoclassical Phillips curve, noting its tradeoff between inflation and unemployment
Identify clear distinctions between neoclassical economics and Keynesian economics

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
09/20/2018