Race, Class, and Ethnicity

Examines relations among persons of different racial groups in an interdisciplinary setting that includes sociological. psychological, political, anthropological and historical viewpoints.

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Beyond Race: Cultural Influences on Human Social Life
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The book is supported by discussion of relevant theory and research in cultural sociology.Beyond Race: Cultural Influences on Human Social Life has stressed learner-centered teaching with the instructor taking on the role of a facilitator of learning. As such, it is expected the instructor will serve as the mediator between the content of this book and learners’ understanding of material on multiple and higher levels. This book does not offer a set of rules in teaching cultural sociology, but rather suggests content and applications to consider and modify as needed by the ever-changing dynamics of instructors and learners.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Vera Kennedy
Date Added:
11/11/2019
Beyond Race - Cultural Influences on Human Social Life
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

The book is supported by discussion of relevant theory and research in cultural sociology. Beyond Race: Cultural Influences on Human Social Life has stressed learner-centered teaching with the instructor taking on the role of a facilitator of learning. As such, it is expected the instructor will serve as the mediator between the content of this book and learners’ understanding of material on multiple and higher levels. This book does not offer a set of rules in teaching cultural sociology, but rather suggests content and applications to consider and modify as needed by the ever-changing dynamics of instructors and learners.

1: Culture and Meaning
Culture is an expression of our lives. It molds our identity and connection to the social world. Whether it is our values, beliefs, norms, language, or everyday artifacts each element of culture reflects who we are and influences our position in society. If you think about how we live, communicate, think and act, these parts of our existence develop from the values, beliefs, and norms we learn from others, the language and symbols we understand, and the artifacts or materials we use.
1.1: Link Between Culture and Society
1.2: Defining Culture
1.3: Cultural Sociology
1.4: Theoretical Perspectives on Culture
1.S: Culture and Meaning (Summary)

2: Culture as a Social Construct
Because culture is a socially meaningful expression that can be articulated and shared it often takes a physical form in our minds. A spiritual or philosophical expression that is not physical in nature becomes tangible in our minds and is equivalent to an “object”. The cultural expression is so real that people perceive it as something achievable or concrete. The mental picture is the object and the meaning associated with the object is the expression when we speak about non-material culture.
2.1: Social Production of Culture
2.2: Collective Culture
2.3: Group and Organizational Culture
2.4: Levels of Culture
2.S: Culture as a Social Construct (Summary)

3: Cultural Power
All humans are comprised of the same biological structure and matter. The unique distinctions among us stem from our culture. The differences in our values, beliefs, norms, expressive language, practices, and artifacts is which stands us apart from each other. Being culturally unique projects exclusivity that draws attention to our variations and differences. People find cultural fit or acceptance from those who share uniqueness or the same cultural characteristics.
3.1: Cultural Hierarchies
3.2: Social and Cultural Capital
3.3: Cultural Hegemoney
3.4: Prejudice and Discrimination
3.S: Cultural Power (Summary)

4: Cultural Identity
Trying to figure out who you are, what you value and believe, and why you think the way you do is a lifelong process. Try to capture the core of your being by describing who you are. Once you have formulated a description of yourself, evaluate what you wrote. Does your description focus on your personal characteristics or your cultural characteristics you learned from other people in your life (i.e., family, friends, congregation, teachers, community, etc.)?
4.1: Identitiy Formation
4.2: Identity Labels and Categories
4.3: Geographic Region
4.4: Race and Ethnicity
4.5: Social Class
4.S: Cultural Identity (Summary)

5: The Multicultural World
Everyday production of culture centers on local and global influences (Giddens 1991). With the advancements in technology and communications, people are experiencing greater social forces in the construction of their cultural reality and identity. The boundaries of locality have expanded to global and virtual contexts that create complexities in understanding the creation, socialization, adaptation, and sustainability of culture.
5.1: Globalization and Identity
5.2: Culture Today
5.3: Building Cultural Intellegence
5.S: The Multicultural World (Summary)

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Vera Kennedy
Date Added:
07/27/2020
Immigrant and Refugee Families: Global Perspectives on Displacement and Resettlement Experiences
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Immigrant and Refugee Families: Global Perspectives on Displacement and Resettlement Experiences uses a family systems lens to discuss challenges and strengths of immigrant and refugee families in the United States. Chapters address immigration policy, human rights issues, economic stress, mental health and traumatic stress, domestic violence, substance abuse, family resilience, and methods of integration.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Minnesota
Provider Set:
University of Minnesota Libraries Publishing
Author:
Catherine Solheim
Elizabeth Wieling
Jaime Ballard
Date Added:
02/20/2019
Sociology: Understanding and Changing the Social World
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The founders of sociology in the United States wanted to make a difference. A central aim of the sociologists of the Chicago school was to use sociological knowledge to achieve social reform. A related aim of sociologists like Jane Addams, W.E.B. DuBois, and Ida B. Wells-Barnett and others since was to use sociological knowledge to understand and alleviate gender, racial, and class inequality.

Steve Barkan’s Sociology: Understanding and Changing the Social World makes sociology relevant for today’s students by balancing traditional coverage with a fresh approach that takes them back to sociology’s American roots in the use of sociological knowledge for social reform.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Minnesota
Provider Set:
University of Minnesota Libraries Publishing
Author:
Steve Barkan
Date Added:
02/20/2019
What We Now Know about Race and Ethnicity
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CC BY-NC-ND
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Attempts of nineteenth-century writers to establish “race” as a biological concept failed after Charles Darwin opened the door to a new world of knowledge. Yet this word already had a place in the organization of everyday life and in ordinary English language usage. This book explains how the idea of race became so important in the USA, generating conceptual confusion that can now be clarified. Developing an international approach, it reviews references to “race,” “racism,” and “ethnicity” in sociology, anthropology, philosophy, and comparative politics and identifies promising lines of research that may make it possible to supersede misleading notions of race in the social sciences.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Michael Banton
Date Added:
09/04/2019