Author:
Ann Marie Stanley
Subject:
Arts and Humanities, Music, Educational Technology, Elementary Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab, Homework/Assignment, Primary Source, Reading, Syllabus, Textbook
Level:
College / Upper Division
Tags:
Arts Integration, Elementary, LOUIS Course Transformation, Music, Music Education, louis-course-transformation
License:
Creative Commons Attribution
Language:
English
Media Formats:
Downloadable docs

MUED 3170: Principles of Teaching Elementary Music

MUED 3170: Principles of Teaching Elementary Music

Overview

This course is designed to introduce students to the materials, methods, and current trends in music teaching at the elementary level, AS WELL AS learn how to locate, assess, use, and cite Open Educational Resources appropriate for elementary music. 

 

Welcome to the Course!

Course Description (from LSU Catalog of Courses)

This course is designed to introduce students to the materials, methods, and current trends in music teaching at the elementary level. Students will learn about curriculum development in elementary music as well.

Thanks to a grant from LOUIS: The Louisiana Library Network, a program of the Louisiana Board of Regents, this course has been transformed for Fall 2021 as part of the Affordable Learning LOUISiana Open Educational Resources Course Transformation Program.

Course Outcomes I

 MUSIC TEACHER DISPOSITIONS (MTDs)

As a professor/student partnership, we will work together so that by the end of the semester you will be able to:

  1. Articulate the critical importance of music education in elementary school.

  2. Know multiple ways to harness student musical creativity in singing, listening, moving, playing instruments, games, and composing.

  3. Use your knowledge of music and children to create “age-appropriate” activities for various grade levels.

  4. Discuss and demonstrate strategies for creating an optimum environment for every student to learn and make music, including arranging and composing music for specific circumstances.

  5. Demonstrate an improvement of your ability in certain teaching skill areas, and improve your professionalism.

  6. Find your own unique niche within elementary music teaching, and be able to reflect on your progress and goals for the future.

Thanks to a grant from LOUIS: The Louisiana Library Network, a program of the Louisiana Board of Regents, this course has been transformed for Fall 2021 as part of the Affordable Learning LOUISiana Open Educational Resources Course Transformation Program.

Course Outcomes II

 OPEN EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES (OERs) USER DIPOSITIONS AND SKILLS

As a professor/student partnership, we will work together so that by the end of the semester you will be able to:

  1. Use open-access resources to become better and more creative, reflective elementary music teachers

  2. Demonstrate an increased disposition toward and facility with creating, locating and using open-access resources for your continued professional learning (aka: your career-long improvement of teaching practice) 

  3. Demonstrate an increased disposition toward and facility with creating, locating and using open-access resources for your continued curricular development (aka: your career-long creation and adaptation of relevant materials for your students)

Cover Image: 

"Singing Girls" by Owen LucasWikipedia Commons is in the Public Domain

Course Projects : Overview

All 8 course projects operate at the intersection of 1 or more MTDs, or Music Teacher Dispositions and Skills (1-6 above) and 1 or more OERs, the OER User Dispositions and Skills. 

These intersections are labeled throughout. 

Example: Project One is labeled MTD 2 + OER 1

This means the project will revolve around:

MTD 2

student creativity in either singing, listening, moving, playing instruments, games, and composing

AND

OER 1

locating open-access resources to help you do so. 

So, for example, in Project One, you will collect a set of 10 songs, games, or instrumental arrangements, annotate them with musical concepts that may be effectively taught with each, and age level. Each one should be attributed and clearly noted with source. You will select and retrieve your content fom OERs where possible. Don't worry, we will be discussing in great detail how to find, evaluate, and use these open resources, as the educational landscape is full of good quality open-access music educational content which will help you (and your future students!)

Here is an example of one such resource. This is the text for our class! 

  Music and the Child" by Natalie SarrazinOpenSUNYSocial Science LibreTexts licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 4.0

And another example: 

Public Domain Song Anthology cover

"Public Domain Song Anthology" by David Berger and Chuck IsraelsUniversity of Virginia LibraryAperio is in the Public Domain, CC0

Open Access logo

This book is distributed under the terms of the CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain Dedication license. Copyright is retained by the author(s)

 

 

 

Course Structure, Course Meetings, Course Expectations, Policies

Course Structure

When do I attend class? 

This course will be offered in a 50%-50% online/F2F format, with “live” meetings on selected MWF dates, 9:30 am- 12 pm. Attendance is required at these Zoom meetings (see below for the exact dates).

Do I have homework before each class? 

Yes! Each of the 12 Zoom class meetings has a few preparatory activities--readings, quick-writes, discussion prompts, forum posts, or other preparation-- to do BEFORE CLASS. These are called MODULES, and there are 10 of them, A - K. 

These Pre-Zoom Modules prepare you for full and active participation in the Zoom session. They are not optional! Our TA will check as you enter Zoom from the waiting room that you have the required preparatory activity completed and ready-to-go.  The 10 Pre-Zoom modules are worth 10 points each, for a total of 100 points. 

Do I have larger projects to do for this class? 

Yes! You have 8 projects, due throughout the semester. The Pre-Zoom Modules and the in-class discussion topics/agenda will help you complete these projects.  Each project is worth 10 points, for a total of 80 points. 

Is there a final exam? 

No!

Is there a final project? 

Yes! There is a final project due on the date/time of our course final exam. It is a 6-week curriculum planning document. It is worth 20 points.

 You can work at your own speed and on your own time, as long as projects are submitted in accordance with and no later than the due dates (roughly: weekly) throughout the semester.

Credit Hour and Engaged Learning Time Expectations

LSU’s general policy states that for each credit hour, you should plan to spend about 45 hours of combined “in-class” and “out-of-class" time working on course related activities such as viewing and interacting with instructional materials, activities and assignments, assigned readings, research, or study time. Therefore, a semester-long, three-credit hour course typically requires around 9 hours of student work per week including class time.

Late work

Contact me in advance if you are going to miss an assignment or turn in work late. This will give me sufficient time to allow for discussing an alternative schedule. This should not be a habit!

Attendance

If you need to miss one of the Zoom meetings, it would be very helpful for us to know in advance so we can record the Zoom and post the link. Regardless: it is your responsibility to find out what you missed and make up all work. My expectation is that everyone will attend all Zoom sessions, because this interaction with all of us together is a huge part of where the learning takes place. If you miss more than one Zoom, we will schedule a conference to discuss a plan for remediation. 

Technical Information

Moodle runs on Windows, Linux, iOS, Android, or any device with a web browser. For information on browsers, please visit the LSU ITS Web Browser Recommendation page.

Google Chrome and Firefox are the recommended browsers for LSU. We also recommend that you have Adobe Flash installed and enabled, and that Javascript is enabled.

 

Hardware Recommendations

The following are helpful for completing your coursework:

  • Headset or earbuds with microphone, or built-in computer mic
  • A webcam, or built-in camera in a computer
  • A laptop, desktop computer, or tablet: please note that neither Moodle, Zoom, nor writing programs have complete functionality on mobile devices. Mobile devices will unfortunately be inadequate for completing all the tasks for this course. 

Important:

If you are experiencing consistent challenges in accessing reliable internet or have other technology concerns which may prevent you from completing the requirements of this course, please contact me and the Dean’s Office at cmdadeansoffice@lsu.edu for help.

 

 

 

 

Course Calendar: Overview of Modules and Projects with Due Dates

 

Date

Pre-Zoom Module Due

In-Class (Zoom)

 Topics and Agenda

Related Project

Title, Number, & Due Date

MTDs + OERs

Covered

8/23

Module A: Orientation to Singing and Songs

Course Introduction and Overview

 

Show-and-Tell

 

What are OERs?  How do you find music education OERs?

 

Song selection: Content, history, and appropriate musical material

Project One:

Annotated 10-Song Collection

 

Due 8/26

MTD 2, 3

+

OER 1

8/30

Module B: Developmentally Appropriate, Age-Appropriate, Culturally Appropriate

What is appropriate musical instruction for students at various stages of musical development?

 

How do these stages intersect with general precepts of child development?

 

What are age-appropriate expectations elementary music teachers need to keep in mind?

Project One:

Annotated 10-Song Collection

 

Due 9/4

MTD 2, 3

+

OER 1

9/8

Module C: Free and Fair Use, Elementary Music Style

Citations and attribution for the elementary music classroom

 

Copyright issues in the music classroom

Common problems and questions about free and fair use of music in performance and teaching settings

Project

Two (group project)

“Professional Dilemma Skit”

Due 9/10

MTD 1, 5

+

OER 2

9/13

Module D: Composing Your Own Music for Kids

Guest Panel on Songwriting: LSU Class of 2020

 

Guest Lecture on Recording: Music Technology Professor

 

Licensing your own work

Project Three:

“My Own Composition”

Due 9/17

MTD 4

+

OER 3

9/20

Module E: Classroom Management Resources

Five-part classroom management plans

 

Handling typical scenarios within elementary music classrooms

 

Scavenger Hunt: Professional Teaching Practice OER resources available

Project Four:

“My Classroom Management Plan”

Due 9/24

MTD 4

+

OER 2

9/27

Module F: Musical Games and Movement with Kids

Top Ten Lists:

Dr. Stanley’s favorite singing games

 

Dr. Stanley’s favorite music movement activities

 

Characteristics and precepts of quality games and movement (creative and structured)

Project Five:

“10-Song Collection, Annotated for Games and Movement”

Due 10/1

 

MTD 2,3

+

OER 1

10/4

Module G: Crucial Importance of Music Education for Children

How to locate open-access (example: PLOS ONE)  journal articles on music research

 

Cutting-edge developments in music + learning research

Project Six:

“School Board Speech”

Due 10/11

MTD 1

+

OER 2

10/11

TBA

TBA (Use for catch-up or extending topics previously covered, or examining new ideas)

 

 

10/25

Module H: Major Approaches/Methodologies in Music Education

View and discuss videos of:

Orff-Schulwerk music teaching

MLT music teaching

Kodaly music teaching

Project Seven:

“My Favorite Approach”

Due 10/28

MTD 5,6

+

OER 2

 

11/8

Module I: Arts Integration

OER Arts Integration resources

 

Arts integration examples

Guests: Local elementary teachers on collaborative planning

Start Final Project:
Six-week Unit Plan”

MTD 3,4

+

OER 3

11/20

Model J: Curriculum Documents

Look at sample curriculum templates

 

Universal Design

 

Continue Final Project

MTD 3, 4

+

OER 3

 

 

 

In-class Topics and Agenda, 8/23

  1. Introduction to Syllabus

  2.  Introduction to Open Educational Resources (Powerpoint)

  3. Online "Scavenger Hunt" - Search-and-find music education resources

  4. Discuss OER Handout

  5. Use Module A Worksheet for discussion on "Song Choice": song content, song history, musical elements

 

Scavenger Hunt Start Sites (focused on your search-and-find songs for your Project One)

"Public Domain Song Anthology" by David Berger and Chuck IsraelsUniversity of Virginia LibraryAperio is in the Public Domain, CC0

 San Jacinto College Open Education Resources- Music

"Dipper of Stars" by Howie Mitchell and Ruth MeyerUniversity of Virginia LibraryFree Music Archive is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 4.0

 

 

 

Module B, due 8/30

Developmentally Appropriate, Age-Appropriate, Culturally Appropriate Teaching

Read and take notes over the following 3 chapters and 1 online website:

Chapters 8 and 9 from  "Music and the Child" by Natalie SarrazinOpenSUNYSocial Science LibreTexts licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 4.0

Chapter 11 from "Introduction to Curriculum for Early Childhood Education" by Jennifer Paris, Kristin Beeve, Clint SpringerCollege of the Canyons licensed under CC BY 4.0  

https://www.morningsidecenter.org/teachable-moment/lessons/teaching-about-controversial-or-difficult-issues

 

In-class Topics and Agenda, 8/30

Class Discussion: Guided by Module B Readings

What is appropriate musical instruction for students at various stages of musical development?

 

How do these stages intersect with general precepts of child development?

 

What are age-appropriate expectations elementary music teachers need to keep in mind?

Project One, "Annotated Song Collection" due 9/4

Project One is an annotated song collection. 

You must submit a set of 10 songs, with sources clearly attributed. Use Open Educational Resources wherever possible (examples and suggested resources given in class on 8/23)

Each song must be annotated with the following:

  1. History or origin of the music and/or text
  2. Appropriate ages or grades in which to use this song
  3. Excellent musical concepts to teach with this song
  4. Best key for the song
  5. Best accompaniment for the song (or a capella)

 

Module C: Free and Fair Use, Elementary Music Style, due 9/8

Read what our professional organization (The National Association for Music Education) has to say about music teachers + copyrighted material: 

NAfME on Music Teachers and Copyright

Answer the following questions in writing.

What questions does this document raise in your mind? 

What "gray areas" do you foresee running into in your future classroom? 

What steps do you need to take to perform a Broadway Junior Musical like "Aladdin" from Musical Theater International?  

What impact does charging admission have on your decisions?  Can you record the performances and give them to free to the parents of the performers? Can you livestream the performances?  For each, explain why or why not.

Watch this video of the NYC PS 22 Chorus singing   Memories by Maroon 5

Can you program this or a similar arrangment on your Spring Concert? Can you record it and publish it to a private,unlisted, and/or public YouTube channel? Can you put the recording on the elementary school website? Explain why or why not. 

 

In-class Topics and Agenda, 9/8

Discussion guided by Module C resources: 

Citations and attribution for the elementary music classroom

Copyright issues in the music classroom

Common problems and questions about free and fair use of music in performance and teaching settings

Review the concept of Remixing

In small groups, jigsaw-read and report on the attached:

"Educators Guide to Creativity and Copyright" by Kerry Gallagher, JDConnect Safely is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

 

Project Two (group project) “Professional Dilemma Skit” due 9/10

Carefully consider the content from class on 9/8 as well as Module C. 

With your assigned group of 5, write a skit exemplifying a dilemma around free, fair, legal, and ethical use of music in which an elementary music teacher might find herself. 

First, write one-three sentences explaining the dilemma. Example: 

Ms. Suarez has been asked to have the fourth grade choir perform the principal's favorite song ("What a Wonderful World" by Louis Armstrong) at the next PTA meeting. Now the PTA also wants her to record the performance and sell it as a fundraiser for the music program. 

Next, write a skit in which the teacher explains her decisions to the following people, responding to their reactions as "teachable moments:"

Principal, Parent/PTA President, Student, Colleague, Other Music Teacher

Be ready to perform the skit and discuss your group's rationale next class period. 

Module D: Composing Your Own Music for Kids, due 9/13

For this module, immerse yourself in fun, creative contemporary kids' music. We've come a long way since the Wheels on the Bus! 

Locate and listen to at least 10 songs this week from sources like: 

Grammy Nominees for Best Children's Album  (last decade)

Satellite Radio (Sirius XM has a good Kids Play channel)

Free Music Archive is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 

Make a list of instruments you play, instruments you could learn for this purpose. 

 

 

 

 

Project Three: "My Own Composition" due 9/17

Compose, arrange, and perform your own original children's song, inspired by contemporary kids' songs you listened to. This should be no longer than 1 minute long. You may audio- or video-record it. These will be shared with the class on 9/20. 

Module E: Classroom Management Resources, due 9/20

Review the following pieces on classroom management. Please note that they are free but copyrighted by the author Jim Wright

https://www.oercommons.org/courses/breaking-the-attention-seeking-habit-the-power-of-random-positive-teacher-attention/view

https://www.oercommons.org/courses/dodging-the-power-struggle-trap-ideas-for-teachers/view

 

"Classroom Management (Part 1): Learning the Components of a Comprehensive Behavior Management Plan" by The Iris CenterPeabody College of Education at Vanderbilt University is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

 (pages 4-13)

Search for and find your own "advice pieces" on establishing an effective classroom environment. Bring to class on 9/20. Here's a sample of a planner publicly available: https://www.interventioncentral.org/tools/behavior-intervention-planner

In-class Topics and Agenda, 9/20

As a group, we will mock up a five-part classroom management plan, from 

 

"Classroom Management (Part 1): Learning the Components of a Comprehensive Behavior Management Plan" by The Iris CenterPeabody College of Education at Vanderbilt University is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

 

  • A statement of purpose: A brief, positive statement that conveys to educational professionals, parents, and students the reasons why various aspects of the management plan are necessary

  • Rules: Explicit statements of how the teacher expects students to behave in her classroom

  • Procedures: A description of the steps required for students to successfully or correctly complete daily routines (e.g., going to the restroom, turning in homework) and less-frequent activities (e.g., responding to fire drills)

  • Consequences: Actions teachers take to respond to both appropriate and inappropriate student behavior

  • An action plan: A method to support the implementation of a comprehensive behavior management plan

 

Handling typical scenarios within elementary music classrooms

Scavenger Hunt: Professional Teaching Practice OER resources available. Share what you found from Module E. 

Module F: Musical Games and Movement with Kids, due 9/27

There are literally 100s of sites with musical songs, games, and movement activities. 
Do a search for some of my favorite teachers' websites. 

Vicky Suarez

Rob Amchin

Doug Goodkin

Jen Bailey

Nick Holland-Garcia

View the new online resource created as a service to the profession during the pandemic of 2020: 

Gettysburg College Music Education Resource Collection

Collect some ideas that interest you from each and bring to class on 9/27.  As a class we will talk about finding, choosing, and VETTING online resources. It is really important to learn how to not only find music teacher materials online, but how to wade through the amount of "stuff" and weed out things that will be less helpful.

 

In-class Topics and Agenda, 9/27

Top Ten Lists:

Dr. Stanley’s favorite singing games

 

Dr. Stanley’s favorite music movement activities

 

Characteristics and precepts of quality games and movement (creative and structured)

In class: Construct a rubric for evaluation of teaching materials found online. 

We will use this document as a jumping off point, especially sections II. Quality of Explanation of the Subject Matter

and VI. Quality of Instructional and Practice Exercises

"Rubrics for Evaluating Open Education Resource (OER) Objects" by Achieve.Org is licensed under CC BY 3.0

Project Five: “10-Song Collection, Annotated for Games and Movement” Due 10/1

Project Five should be fun! Take the 10 songs from Project One and for each:

Choose 

Create 

Adapt

an accompanying elementary-appropriate movement and game. 

Please see the attached document for "Bluebird, Bluebird" as a suggestion for how multiple songs, activities, games, and movement activities can be packaged together. The authors at SongWorks Educators Association are particularly skilled at doing this. Should this format appeal to you, I strongly suggest you join this non-profit association for full access to all their materials. It is only $20 for students for a full year of access. 

In-class Topics and Agenda, 10/4

Effective educators and advocates for music education are also informed locators and consumers of related research! In this class, we will learn to find and evaluate cutting-edge developments in music + learning research. 

We will learn how to locate open-access (example: PLOS ONE)  journal articles on music research. Example: 

"Sight-over-sound judgments of music performances are replicable effects with limited interpretability" by Samuel A. Mehr, Daniel A. Scannel, Ellen WinnerPLOS ONE is licensed under CC BY 4.0

 

We will also look for student-facing sites that are research-based. Example: https://www.themusiclab.org/

 

Project Six: “School Board Speech” Due 10/11

Using what you feel are the most compelling brain-based arguments for music education, compose a two-minute speech to explain these benefits to a public school board considering cutting music education from the curriculum. 

Watch the opening "Public Comment" section of a couple of EBRPSS school board meetings to get a sense of how people use the two-minute platform effectively (or not!)

 https://ebrschools.org/about/meeting-videos/

Module H: Major Approaches/Methodologies in Music Education, due 10/25

Read Chapter 4:  "Music and the Child" by Natalie SarrazinOpenSUNYSocial Science LibreTexts licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 about the major approaches to music education: Zoltan Kodály, Emile-Jacques Dalcroze, Orff Schulwerk, Edwin Gordon, Shinseki Suzuki, and Reggio Emilia.

Locate the related association websites for each of these methodologies/approaches (example: American Orff-Schulwerk Association) and search for information on how teachers obtain advanced training in each of these. 

 

In-class Topics and Agenda, 10/25

View and discuss videos:

 

Orff-Schulwerk music teaching

Introduction to Music Learning Theory

Music Learning Theory teaching

Kodaly music teaching

 

We will use the attached document to anchor our discussion over our teaching observations. This is a typical observation document. This particular summary  was created by Charlotte Danielson with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation for the Measure of Teaching Effectiveness Project

Many districts use the Danielson Teacher Evaluation Rubric for observing and assessing teachers. It is copyrighted but free to download and use for your own teaching setting. 

 

Note the Gates Foundation specifies the following: 

YOU MAY REVIEW, DOWNLOAD, COPY, DISTRIBUTE AND USE THE AVAILABLE CONTENT SOLELY FOR THE PURPOSE OF FURTHERING YOUR MISSION IN THE ORDINARY COURSE OF YOUR GOVERNMENTAL OR CHARITABLE PURPOSE AND ATTENDANT OPERATIONS. YOU MAY NOT SELL THE AVAILABLE CONTENT OR OTHERWISE DISTRIBUTE IT FOR A FEE. YOU WILL NOT USE OR DISCLOSE IT OR THE SITE TO ANY THIRD PARTIES EXCEPT AS EXPRESSLY PERMITTED BY THESE TERMS.

Project Seven: “My Favorite Approach” Due 10/28

Write a two- to three-page (double-spaced) essay on which approaches/methodologies resonated MOST and LEAST with your own personal musical philosophy and perspectives on music teaching and learning. Anchor your discussion with facts and citations from the texts and websites. 

In-class Topics and Agenda, 11/8

We will first examine several OER Arts Integration resources, starting with   this curated arts integration collection from the public digital library: OER Commons

Arts integration examples 

Guest Panel:  Local elementary teachers on collaborative planning between classroom teachers and music educators

In-class Topics and Agenda 11/20

Look at sample curriculum templates created by EL Education.org Curriculum Development and Organizational Templates Google Drive

There's a lot here, so in class we will divvy them up and take a close examination of which templates might be most appropriate for music education purposes.

You may download them and use them as your own template, as the creating organization states: EL invites noncommercial use of its publications, resources, presentations, learning tools, professional development tools, and collection of student work. You are free to download materials and share them with others as long as they are not altered in any way, and as long as EL and, if applicable, an author, is given proper attribution.

We will also do an overview of Universal Design using this resource: 

"Universal Design" from the BC Open Textbook Accessibility Toolkit by Amanda Coolidge, Sue Doner, and Tara RobertsonBCCampus is licensed under CC BY 4.0

Final Project, Due 12/1

You will create a four-week curriculum for the grade level of your choice. This format and content will be workshopped in three small-group sessions scheduled through Dr. Stanley's Sessions for Curriculum Workshops (max 3 attendees each).  The intent is to use the documents garnered in the last two modules and classes, along with the 10-song annotation collections, as a jumping off point for a more extensive unit.