STEM and Health Sciences Curation

This is the phase two curation group for LOUIS, finding and curating appropriate OER content to cover science, technology, engineering, math, and health sciences courses associated with the Common Course catalog and with the Louisiana Community and Technical College's career clusters framework.
13 Members | 46 Affiliated resources

All resources in STEM and Health Sciences Curation

Evolutionary Biology

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This is a course developed for students who are going to do evolution for the first time. Therefore, they should have working knowledge of the chromosome theory and the nature of meiosis with particular reference to recombination and its advantages in the process of reproduction. They should also be conversant with the principles and concepts of Mendelian and post Mendelian genetics to be able to describe such terms as genotype, phenotype and variation. This will require them to know that a gene is the unit of heredity and that it is located on the Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule. They should understand the structure and role of DNA, as the universal molecule that specifies the amino acid sequence of proteins in cells of organisms. This knowledge should be of an elementary type as described in Advanced Level Biology textbooks.

Material Type: Module

Author: Jassiel Nyengani Zulu

Evolutionary Biology

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This course will look at the various mechanisms of evolution, how these mechanisms work, and how change is measured. The course will begin by reviewing the evolutionary concepts of selection and speciation. The student will then learn to measure evolutionary change and look at the history of life according to the fossil record and a discussion of the broad range of life forms as they are currently classified. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: define evolution and describe different types of selection; provide examples of microevolutionary forces and describe how they impact the genetics of populations; describe the Hardy-Weinberg principle and solve problems related to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium; provide examples of games used in evolutionary game theory; connect biological phenomena to game theory; develop simple phylogenies from molecular or morphological data; identify important evolutionary events that have occurred throughout geologic time; characterize and provide examples of major plant and animal phyla. (Biology 312)

Material Type: Full Course

Introduction to Evolutionary Biology and Ecology - Laboratory

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This lab course supplements ĺÎĺĺĺŤIntroduction to Evolutionary Biology and EcologyĄ_ĺĺö. Although it does not replicate a true lab experience, it does encourage greater familiarity with scientific thinking and techniques, and will enable exploration of some key principles of evolutionary biology and ecology. This lab supplement focuses on visual understanding, application, and practical use of knowledge. In each unit, the student will work through tutorials related to important scientific concepts and then will be asked to think creatively about how that knowledge can be put to practical or experimental use. Upon successful completion of this lab supplement, the student will be able to: Display an understanding of Mendelian inheritance as applied to organisms in virtual experiments; Describe the process of natural selection and understand how it will alter populations over generations and under a variety of selection pressures; Understand how the process of speciation is affected by isolation and selection pressures; Understand predator-prey dynamics under a variety of ecological conditions; Distinguish between biomes in terms of their structure/climates as well as the types and diversity of organisms that inhabit them. (Biology 102 Laboratory)

Material Type: Full Course

Developmental Biology

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In this course, the student will learn about the field of developmental biology from its origins to the present day. The course will take a look at historical experiments as well as modern techniques and the mechanisms of development. The student will follow a variety of metazoan organisms from their start at fertilization through the stages of their development and on to entire organismal and post-embryonic development, learning along the way about the molecular and genetic regulations involved in these processes. (Biology 310)

Material Type: Full Course

Developmental Biology Overview - Anatomy & Physiology

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Embryo, when applied to mammals, is the term given to the developing organism from fertilisation to birth. Developmental biology, or embryology, is the study of the embryo as it transforms from a unicellular zygote to a multicellular, mulitsystemed organism which in some cases is ready to function autonomously at birth. Developmental biology is of interest to vets in understanding why organs and systems are the way they are, but also in understanding genetic diseases and applying cell based therapies to treat loss or damage to tissues.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading

Introductory Biology, Spring 2013

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The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. 7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer), developmental biology, neurobiology and evolution.Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized in all courses and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.  

Material Type: Assessment, Diagram/Illustration, Full Course, Homework/Assignment, Reading, Syllabus

Authors: Diviya Sinha, Hazel Sive, Tyler Jacks

Molecular Biology

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After a historical introduction to molecular biology, this course describes the basic types of DNA and RNA structure and the molecular interactions that shape them. It describes how DNA is packaged within the cellular nucleus as chromosomes. It also describes the core processes of molecular biology: replication of DNA, transcription of DNA into messenger RNA, and translation of messenger RNA into a protein. These are followed by modifications of these basic processes: regulation of gene expression, DNA mutation and repair, and DNA recombination and transposition. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: discuss the experimental findings that lead to the discovery of inheritance laws; discuss the experimental findings that lead to the identification of DNA as the hereditary material; compare and contrast the structure and function of mRNA, rRNA, tRNA, and DNA; identify the characteristics of catalyzed reactions; compare and contrast enzyme and ribozyme catalyzed reactions; discuss the structure of the chromosome and the consequence of histone modifications in eukaryotes; discuss the stages of transcription, differential splicing, and RNA turnover; predict the translation product of an mRNA using the genetic code; compare and contrast transcription and translation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes; identify codon bias and variations of the standard genetic code; compare and contrast the regulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene expression; predict the activation of an operon and tissue specific gene expression based on the availability of regulators; compare and contrast mutations based on their effect on the gene product; discuss DNA repair mechanisms; discuss DNA recombination, transposition, and the consequence of exon shuffling; design custom-made recombinant DNA using PCR, restriction enzymes, and site-directed mutagenesis; compare and contrast the uses of model organisms; discuss the uses of model organisms in specific molecular biology applications. (Biology 311)

Material Type: Full Course

Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Biology - Laboratory

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This lab course supplements Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Biology. Although it does not replicate a true lab experience, it does enable further exploration of some key principles of molecular and cellular biology. In each unit, the student will work through tutorials related to important scientific concepts, and then will be asked to think creatively about how those concepts can be put to practical or experimental use. This lab course also contains activities devoted to learning important techniques in scientific study such as microscope use, DNA extraction, Polymerase Chain Reaction, and examination of DNA microarrays. Upon successful completion of this lab supplement, students will be able to: Identify the important components of scientific experiments and create their own experiments; Identify the molecular differences between proteins, fats, and carbohydrates, and explain the molecular behavior of water; Describe the process of photosynthesis; Describe the process of cellular respiration; Identify the differences between DNA and RNA; Describe the entire transcription/translation process, from gene to protein; Explain how recombinant genomes are formed; Use critical thinking to find ways that any of the above natural processes might be altered or manipulated; Explain how to use a compound light microscope for data collection; Explain how to conduct and use various experimental techniques, including DNA extraction, PCR, and DNA microarrays. (Biology 101 Laboratory)

Material Type: Full Course

Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Biology

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Though biology as we know it today is a relatively new field, we have been studying living things since the beginning of recorded history. This introductory course in biology starts at the microscopic level, with molecules and cells, then moves into the specifics of cell structure and behavior. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Describe in general terms how life began on Earth; Identify early scientists that played important roles in furthering our understanding of cellular life; Describe the characteristics that define life; List the inorganic and organic molecules that are necessary for life; List the structure and function of organelles in animal and plant cells; List the similarities and differences between animal and plant cells; Describe the reactions in photosynthesis; Explain how the different photosynthetic reactions are found in different parts of the chloroplast; Describe the sequence of photosynthetic reactions; Explain the use of products and the synthesis of reactants in photosynthesis; Explain how protein is synthesized in eukaryotic cells; Describe the similarities and differences between photosynthesis and aerobic respiration; List the reactions in aerobic respiration; Explain the use of products and the synthesis of reactants in aerobic respiration; Describe the similarities and differences between anaerobic and aerobic respiration. (Biology 101; See also: Psychology 203)

Material Type: Full Course

General Biology I

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An integrated course stressing the principles of biology. Life processes are examined primarily at the molecular and cellular levels. Intended for students majoring in biology or for non-majors who wish to take advanced biology courses.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Full Course, Lecture Notes, Syllabus

Authors: Ph.D., Professor Brian White

Nursing Care at the End of Life: What Every Clinician Should Know

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Dr. Lowey works with both juniors and seniors in the traditional Nursing program, teaching Community Health Nursing and Nursing Research. She earned her PhD in Health Practice Research from the University of Rochester and was awarded a Claire M. Fagin Fellowship from the Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Program for her post-doctoral work. Improving care at the end of life, with a particular focus on symptom management, is the focus of Dr. Lowey’s research. The majority of her clinical practice has been as a community health hospice nurse providing care for dying patients and their loved ones. Table of Contents Part I. Anticipation 1. A Historical Overview of End-of-Life Care 2. Types and Variability within Illness Trajectories 3. Conceptual Frameworks Guiding Death & Dying 4. Models of Organized End-of-Life Care: Palliative Care vs. Hospice 5. Initiating Conversations about Goals of Care Part II. In the Moment 6. Management of Pain and Physical Symptoms 7. Management of Emotional and Spiritual Distress 8. Ethical Concerns in End-of-Life Care 9. Care at the Time of Death 10. Nurse–Patient–Family Communication Part III. Afterwards 11. Diversity in Dying: Death across Cultures 12. Grief and Bereavement Reviews available here: https://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/textbooks/nursing-care-at-the-end-of-life-what-every-clinician-should-know

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Susan E. Lowey

Anatomy and Physiology II

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Includes sections on the Endocrine System, the Cardiovascular System, the Lymphatic and Immune System, the Respiratory System, the Digestive System, Nutrition, the Urinary System, the Reproductive System, and Development and Inheritance.

Material Type: Full Course

Undergraduate Diagnostic Imaging Fundamentals

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Diagnostic Imaging principles and concepts are augmented by the presentation of imaging for common clinical conditions. Guiding principles related to minimizing radiation exposure and requesting the most appropriate imaging examination is addressed. Static images are enhanced by the ability to access images stored and displayed on an Html-5 compatible, Dicom image viewer that simulates a simple Picture Archive and Communication system (PACS). Users can also access other imaging from the Dicom viewer (ODIN), beyond the basic curriculum provided, to further advance their experience with viewing diagnostic imaging pathologies.This book is also available in three other digital formats: ePUB (for Nook, iBooks, Kobo etc.), PDF (regular print), PDF (large print). Reviews available here: https://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/textbooks/undergraduate-diagnostic-imaging-fundamentals

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Brent Burbridge

Clinical Anatomy

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Interactive radiology images, animated modules showing the physiology of difficult to understand muscle groups, sketches of anatomy, and links to the already existing quality neuroanatomy website. Covers: Head and Neck Anatomy Videos Back and Core Thorax Radiological Atlas Abdomen Upper Limb Anatomical Illustrations Lower Limb Embryology Neuroanatomy Pelvis

Material Type: Interactive

Authors: Claudia Krebs, Monika Fejtek

Clinical Procedures for Safer Patient Care

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This open educational resource (OER) was developed to ensure best practice and quality care based on the latest evidence, and to address inconsistencies in how clinical health care skills are taught and practised in the clinical setting. The checklist approach, used in this textbook, aims to provide standardized processes for clinical skills and to help nursing schools and clinical practice partners keep procedural practice current. Each skill/procedure is covered in a chapter that has learning objectives, a brief overview of the relevant theory, checklists of steps for procedures with the rationale behind each step of the process, and a summary of key takeaways. Key terms are set in bold throughout the book and laid out again in a Glossary in the appendix. All 88 checklists are also summarized, and hyperlinked to the original checklist, in the appendix. Reviews available here: https://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/textbooks/clinical-procedures-for-safer-patient-care

Material Type: Textbook

Supporting Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities & Mental Illness

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This multidisciplinary resource develops topics of interest to all those who care about and for individuals with co-occurring intellectual disabilities and mental illness. Each chapter presents current evidence informed practice knowledge. Each topic is also presented with audio enabled text boxes emphasizing 'Key Points for Caregivers.' For those who are interested in background knowledge, we provided the comprehensive literature base. And, for those interested mainly in 'what to do,' we provided text box summaries for reading and listening. Reviews available here: https://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/textbooks/supporting-individuals-with-intellectual-disabilities-mental-illness

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Cheryl Crocker, Debra Dusome, Elizabeth Athens, John Simpson, Sherri Melrose