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  • LACC.CBIO 2233
Atlas of Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
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CC BY
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The Atlas of Comparative Anatomy began as a class project at SUNY Oneonta in 2017 because of the lack of a comprehensive freely-accessible photographic atlas. The majority of entries in this atlas were produced by students including dissection, photography, and identification. It is a work in progress, but we hope that students of anatomy find this a useful tool for studying anatomy outside of the lab.

The authors are interested in learning who adopts this tool for their course. If you do, please email Dr. Kristen Roosa at Kristen.Roosa@oneonta.edu.

PDF version available: https://dspace.sunyconnect.suny.edu/handle/1951/71276

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Natural Science
Veterinary Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Kristen Roosa
Date Added:
03/25/2021
Biology 2e, Biological Diversity, Introduction to Animal Diversity, Animal Phylogeny
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CC BY
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By the end of this section, you will be able to do the following:

Interpret the metazoan phylogenetic tree
Describe the types of data that scientists use to construct and revise animal phylogeny
List some of the relationships within the modern phylogenetic tree that have been discovered as a result of modern molecular data

Subject:
Applied Science
Material Type:
Module
Date Added:
09/20/2018
Evolutionary Biology
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CC BY
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This course will look at the various mechanisms of evolution, how these mechanisms work, and how change is measured. The course will begin by reviewing the evolutionary concepts of selection and speciation. The student will then learn to measure evolutionary change and look at the history of life according to the fossil record and a discussion of the broad range of life forms as they are currently classified. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: define evolution and describe different types of selection; provide examples of microevolutionary forces and describe how they impact the genetics of populations; describe the Hardy-Weinberg principle and solve problems related to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium; provide examples of games used in evolutionary game theory; connect biological phenomena to game theory; develop simple phylogenies from molecular or morphological data; identify important evolutionary events that have occurred throughout geologic time; characterize and provide examples of major plant and animal phyla. (Biology 312)

Subject:
Biology
Natural Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019