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About Writing: A Guide
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This writer’s reference condenses and covers everything a beginning writing student needs to successfully compose college-level work, including the basics of composition, grammar, and research. It is broken down into easy-to-tackle sections, while not overloading students with more information than they need. Great for any beginning writing students or as reference for advanced students!

Reviews available here: https://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/textbooks/about-writing-a-guide

Subject:
Literature and Composition
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
OpenOregon
Author:
Robin Jeffrey
Date Added:
05/27/2015
Advanced Workshop in Writing for Social Sciences and Architecture (ELS), Spring 2007
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Advanced subject focusing on techniques, format, and prose style used in academic and professional life. Emphasis on writing as required in fields such as economics, political science, and architecture. Short assignments include: business letters, memos, and proposals that lead toward a written term project. Methods designed to deal with the special problems of those whose first language is not English. Successful completion satisfies Phase II of the Writing Requirement. This workshop is designed to help you write clearly, accurately and effectively in both an academic and a professional environment. In class, we analyze various forms of writing and address problems common to advanced speakers of English. We will often read one another's work.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Brennecke, Patricia W.
Date Added:
01/01/2007
American Foreign Policy: Theory and Method, Fall 2004
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Examines the causes and consequences of American foreign policy since 1898. Readings cover theories of American foreign policy, historiography of American foreign policy, central historical episodes including the two World Wars and the Cold War, case study methodology, and historical investigative methods. Open to undergraduates by permission of instructor.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Van Evera, Stephen
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Architectural Design, Level II: Material and Tectonic Transformations: The Herreshoff Museum, Fall 2003
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This semester students are asked to transform the Hereshoff Museum in Bristol, Rhode Island, through processes of erasure and addition. Hereshoff Manufacturing was recognized as one of the premier builders of America's Cup racing boats between 1890's and 1930's. The studio however, is about more then the program. It is about land, water, and wind and the search for expressing materially and tectonically the relationships between these principle conditions. That is, where the land is primarily about stasis (docking, anchoring and referencing our locus), water's fluidity holds the latent promise of movement and freedom. Movement is activated by wind, allowing for negotiating the relationship between water and land.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Visual Arts
Manufacturing
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Lukez, Paul
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Architectural Design Workshops Computational Design for Housing, Spring 2002
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An intensive 9 DAY remote collaborative workshop involving MIT and Miyagi University in Japan. The objective is to develop a small housing project using shape computation as a design methodology. Students will use and test new interactive software for designing, sharing applications with overseas partners, presenting projects on an Internet workspace, and critiquing design proposals through the web and other advanced digital technologies. Students will be expected to do most of their work in class.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Knight, Terry W.
Date Added:
01/01/2002
Beginning Costume Design and Construction, Fall 2008
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CC BY-NC-SA
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" This is an intermediate workshop designed for students who have a basic understanding of the principles of theatrical design and who want a more intensive study of costume design and the psychology of clothing. Students develop designs that emerge through a process of character analysis, based on the script and directorial concept. Period research, design, and rendering skills are fostered through practical exercises. Instruction in basic costume construction, including drafting and draping, provide tools for students to produce final projects."

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Held, Leslie Cocuzzo
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Brainstorming Your Research Topic Handout
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CC BY-NC
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Associated lessons plans are also available for download and adaptation in the Guttman Community College OER collection in CUNY Academic Works.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Guttman Community College
Author:
Alexandra Hamlett
Meagan Lacy
Date Added:
01/25/2017
Career Options for Biomedical Research, Fall 2006
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course has been designed as a seminar to give students an understanding of how scientists with medical or scientific degrees conduct research in both hospital and academic settings. There will be interactive discussions with research clinicians and scientists about the career opportunities and research challenges in the biomedical field, which an MIT student might prepare for by obtaining an MD, PhD, or combined degrees. The seminar will be held in a case presentation format, with topics chosen from the radiological sciences, including current research in magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and other nuclear imaging techniques, and advances in radiation therapy. With the lectures as background, we will also examine alternative and related options such as biomedical engineering, medical physics, and medical engineering. We'll use as examples and points of comparisons the curriculum paths available through MIT's Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering. In past years we have given very modest assignments such as readings in advance of or after a seminar, and a short term project.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Yip, Sidney
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Crafting Research Questions and Qualitative Methodology, Fall 2005
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Seminar provides an overview of quantitative and qualitative research methods in the social sciences. Topics covered include: hypothesis formulation and theory construction; data collection techniques (experimental, survey, and observational); ethical issues in research; and how to prepare a research proposal. Goal is to provide students with the methodological skills to evaluate existing studies and to select appropriate methods for use in their own research.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Tendler, Judith
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Creating Keywords Handout
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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Related lesson plans are also available for download and adaptation in the Guttman Community College OER collection in the CUNY Academic Works institutional repository.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Guttman Community College
Author:
Alexandra Hamlett
Meagan Lacy
Date Added:
01/25/2017
Creating Keywords from a Research Question Lesson
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This lesson helps students recognize that they need to use different types of searching language in order to retrieve relevant results and to emphasize that research is an iterative process. Use when students have already formulated a research question and are about to begin searching for information on their topic.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Guttman Community College
Author:
Alexandra Hamlett
Meagan Lacy
Date Added:
01/05/2017
Disease and Society in America, Fall 2005
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This course examines the growing importance of medicine in culture, economics and politics. It uses an historical approach to examine the changing patterns of disease, the causes of morbidity and mortality, the evolution of medical theory and practice, the development of hospitals and the medical profession, the rise of the biomedical research industry, and the ethics of health care in America.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jones, David
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Educational Psychology
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This books lays the foundation for prospective teachers to learn about various teaching methodologies and covers material typically found in many teacher training programs. Chapters in the text can be assigned either from beginning to end, as with a conventional printed book, or they can be selected in some other sequence to meet the needs of particular students or classes. In general the first half of the book focuses on broader questions and principles taken from psychology per se, and the second half focuses on somewhat more practical issues of teaching. But the division between “theory” and “practice” is only approximate; all parts of the book draw on research, theory, and practical wisdom wherever appropriate. Chapter 2 is about learning theory, and Chapter 3 is about development; but as we point out, these topics overlap with each other as well as with the concerns of daily teaching. Chapter 4 is about several forms of student diversity (what might be called individual differences in another context), and Chapter 5 is about one form of diversity that has become prominent in schools recently—students with disabilities. Chapter 6 is about motivation, a topic that is heavily studied by psychological researchers, but that also poses perennial challenges to classroom teachers.

Subject:
Education
Psychology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Provider Set:
Saylor Textbooks
Author:
Kelvin Seifert
Rosemary Sutton
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Elementary Ergonomics
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Elementary Ergonomics is an introduction to basic physical ergonomics theory and practice for students of other - than Industrial Design Engineering of Delft University of Technology - institutes for higher learning, such as Dutch universities, universities of EU and non-EU countries, and universities of applied sciences. The course consists of the following topics: anthropometry (1D, 2D, 3D including digital human modelling), biomechanics, and comfort.

Furthermore, the role of user involvement in the design process (evaluation of existing products and environments and of created concepts, models and prototypes) will be explained. Moreover, the meaning and representation of use cues in product design will be highlighted.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Provider:
Delft University of Technology
Provider Set:
Delft University OpenCourseWare
Author:
ir M.C. Dekker
Date Added:
02/26/2016
English Composition
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Welcome to English 101! This text is designed to reinforce reading, writing, and thinking skills that you already have been practicing as well as to introduce you to new strategies, giving you opportunities to reinforce and strengthen your skills.

Table of Contents:

CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE
College Writing
Becoming a College Student
What’s College For?
Find Your Passion

CHAPTER 2: LEARNING TO LEARN
Introduction to Success Skills
World View and Self-Efficacy
Choose Your Attitude
College Success Basics
Habits for Success
Time Management
Avoiding Procrastination

CHAPTER 3: READING WELL
Reading Comprehension Definition
Working with Texts
Writing about Texts
Writing a Formal Summary
Analyzing a Text

CHAPTER 4: UNDERSTANDING RHETORIC AND ARGUMENT
Understanding Rhetorical Analysis
Rhetorical Concepts and Vocabulary
Rhetorical Analysis in the Real World
Audience and Purpose

CHAPTER 5: THE WRITING PROCESS
Understanding the Assignment
Getting Started
Outlining
Refining the Thesis and Organizing the Essay
Constructing the Thesis and Argument—From the Ground Up
Drafting
Getting Feedback
Revising
Reverse Outlining
Editing
Proofreading

CHAPTER 6: EFFECTIVE PARAGRAPHS AND ESSAYS
Tone, Voice, and Point of View
Paragraphs
Transitions
Organization and Development
Introductions and Conclusions
Countering Opposing Arguments

CHAPTER 7: RESEARCH STRATEGIES
The Research Process
Information Literacy
Types of Sources
Research Strategies
Summary vs. Paraphrase
Paraphrasing
Avoiding Plagiarism
Plagiarism: What It Is and How to Avoid It

CHAPTER 8: USING MLA STYLE
Document Formatting in MLA Style
In-Text Citations
Citing Sources in Your Paper
The Works Cited Page

CHAPTER 9: SENTENCE SKILLS
Sentence Variety and Complexity
Coordination and Subordination
Strategies for English Language Learners

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Alexa Johnson
Alex Gavilan
Byron Campbell
College of the Canyons
Jennifer Brezina
Date Added:
02/04/2021
Frameworks of Urban Governance, January (IAP) 2007
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Urban governance comprises the various forces, institutions, and movements that guide economic and physical development, the distribution of resources, social interactions, and other aspects of daily life in urban areas. This course examines governance from legal, political, social, and economic perspectives. In addition, we will discuss how these structures constrain collective decision making about particular urban issues (immigration, education‰Ű_). Assignments will be nightly readings and a short paper relating an urban issue to the frameworks outlined in the class.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kobes, Deborah
Date Added:
01/01/2007
The Information Literacy User’s Guide: An Open, Online Textbook
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Good researchers have a host of tools at their disposal that make navigating today’s complex information ecosystem much more manageable. Gaining the knowledge, abilities, and self-reflection necessary to be a good researcher helps not only in academic settings, but is invaluable in any career, and throughout one’s life. The Information Literacy User’s Guide will start you on this route to success.The Information Literacy User’s Guide is based on two current models in information literacy: The 2011 version of The Seven Pillars Model, developed by the Society of College, National and University Libraries in the United Kingdom and the conception of information literacy as a metaliteracy, a model developed by one of this book’s authors in conjunction with Thomas Mackey, Dean of the Center for Distance Learning at SUNY Empire State College. These core foundations ensure that the material will be relevant to today’s students.The Information Literacy User’s Guide introduces students to critical concepts of information literacy as defined for the information-infused and technology-rich environment in which they find themselves. This book helps students examine their roles as information creators and sharers and enables them to more effectively deploy related skills. This textbook includes relatable case studies and scenarios, many hands-on exercises, and interactive quizzes.

Reviews available here: https://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/textbooks/the-information-literacy-user-s-guide-an-open-online-textbook

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Textbook
Provider:
State University of New York
Provider Set:
OpenSUNY Textbooks
Author:
Allison Hosier and Tor Loney
Daryl Bullis
Deborah Bernnard
Greg Bobish
Irina Holden
Jenna Hecker
Trudi Jacobson
Date Added:
04/24/2019
Innovative Lesson Plans for Active Learning: Teaching Nursing Research and Evidence-Based Practice
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Innovative Lessons Plans for Active Learning: Teaching Research and Evidence-Based Practice is a resource in research and evidence-based practice for active learning in the undergraduate nursing classroom. It is meant to supplement any nursing research text. Designed to provide educators with creative teaching ideas, this text includes a variety of lessons on nursing research topics. Topics include bias, measurement, sampling, theory and more. Lessons provide active learning for in-class, hybrid, and online formats. Each lesson includes objectives, overview, and detailed steps. As an open access resource, the text is continuously in-process. Designed to be independent of any published text, the book compliments any nursing research and evidence-based course. This text is also a suitable resource for introductory research in other disciplines.

Each chapter is an activity designed to supplement didactic andragogy. The activities develop creativity and facilitate engagement in the nursing research content. Through creative engagement, students access learning areas of the brain that otherwise remain unstimulated. Organized by the order in which they might be discussed in class, each chapter builds upon previous learning. In chapter two students are introduced by creating puppets to develop research questions and study ideas. Chapter three focuses specifically on generating problem and purpose statements. Culture shots in chapter five engages students in understanding theory generation, qualitative research and ethics in data collection. Chapters six and seven build upon and strengthen theory understanding through creating concepts and challenging assumptions. In chapter eight, biases and threats to validity are investigated through the use of parody. Sampling is addressed in chapters nine through eleven. Chapter twelve reinforces learning on measurement error. The last four chapters use creative games to help students pull it all together. Chapters thirteen and fourteen utilize existing free resources to enhance the learning experience. Chapters fifteen and sixteen allow students to work together to create understanding for themselves and other students.

We hope you enjoy the book as much as we enjoyed creating it. We would love to hear your comment and ideas for improvement. Please also view our video introduction at https://youtu.be/x9NDv2H_Cdg.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Afokoghene Odhu
Chibwe Caroline Powell
Genevieve B. Elrod
Karyn Butler
Susan M. Strouse
Date Added:
07/02/2019
Introduction to Basic Legal Citation
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This is not a comprehensive citation reference work. Its limited aim is to serve as a tutorial on how to cite the most widely referenced types of U.S. legal material, taking account of local norms and the changes in citation practice forced by the shift from print to electronic sources. It begins with an introductory unit. That is followed immediately by one on "how to cite" the categories of authority that comprise a majority of the citations in briefs and legal memoranda. Using the full table of contents one can proceed through this material in sequence. The third unit, organized around illustrative examples, is intended to be used either for review and reinforcement of the prior "how to" sections or as an alternative approach to them. One can start with it since the illustrative examples for each document type are linked back to the relevant "how to" principles.

Access also available here: https://www.cali.org/books/introduction-basic-legal-citation

Table of Contents
1-000. Basic Legal Citation: What and Why?
2-000. How to Cite
3-000. Examples - Citations Of
4-000. Abbreviations and Omissions Used in Citations
5-000. Underlining and Italics
6-000. Placing Citations in Context
7-000. Reference Tables

Subject:
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
The Center for Computer Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI)
Provider Set:
The eLangdell Bookstore
Author:
Peter Martin
Date Added:
01/01/2013
Introduction to Communication Research: Becoming a Scholar
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Welcome to your journey to becoming a communication scholar! We developed this workbook to guide you through the semester as you learn how understand and conduct scholarly research. What does it mean to be a scholar? A scholar is someone who specializes in a particular area of study. For you, this area is communication. And how do you become a scholar? By doing research.

But why is it important for you to learn research skills? You might be thinking, I want to be a journalist or make TV shows or work in public relations, why do I need to learn how to do research? Well, if you want someone to watch your TV show, read your article, or listen to your campaign, you will need to conduct research to see if the audience you’re targeting even exists. You will need to research to find out if your ideas are original, what the person you’re interviewing for an article has done in the past, or what makes a successful public relations campaign. You’ll need data in order to pitch your new TV show idea.

To be successful in organizational and business communication, it is essential that you learn how to effectively promote successful communication in any institution. This may include writing training manuals, employee handbooks, or conducting in-depth personnel research to ensure overall satisfaction of employees. Also, scholarly research is the foundation of any discipline, and many of the core principles of this field are derived from scholarly research.

Because we want you to succeed in the industry, we will spend the semester learning how to conduct research in the field of communication. We’ll start by providing you with a short history of communication research, show you how to gather academic research, and teach you how to write a literature review. Let's get started!

Subject:
Communication
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Erin Ryan
Karen Sichler
Kennesaw State University
Lindsey Hand
Date Added:
01/27/2021