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Adaptive Map Open Statics Textbook
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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Open textbook in statics for engineering undergraduates. Covers particles and rigid bodies (extended bodies), structures (trusses), and simple machines. Includes text, videos, images, and worked examples (written and video).

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Adaptive Map Digital Textbook Project
Author:
Jacob Moore
Date Added:
04/24/2019
Biology 2e
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

Biology 2e is designed to cover the scope and sequence requirements of a typical two-semester biology course for science majors. The text provides comprehensive coverage of foundational research and core biology concepts through an evolutionary lens. Biology includes rich features that engage students in scientific inquiry, highlight careers in the biological sciences, and offer everyday applications. The book also includes various types of practice and homework questions that help students understand—and apply—key concepts. The 2nd edition has been revised to incorporate clearer, more current, and more dynamic explanations, while maintaining the same organization as the first edition. Art and illustrations have been substantially improved, and the textbook features additional assessments and related resources.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
03/07/2018
Biology 2e, Ecology, Ecosystems, Ecology of Ecosystems
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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By the end of this section, you will be able to do the following:

Describe the basic ecosystem types
Explain the methods that ecologists use to study ecosystem structure and dynamics
Identify the different methods of ecosystem modeling
Differentiate between food chains and food webs and recognize the importance of each

Material Type:
Module
Date Added:
09/20/2018
Biology 2e, The Chemistry of Life, The Chemical Foundation of Life, Atoms, Isotopes, Ions, and Molecules: The Building Blocks
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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By the end of this section, you will be able to do the following:

Define matter and elements
Describe the interrelationship between protons, neutrons, and electrons
Compare the ways in which electrons can be donated or shared between atoms
Explain the ways in which naturally occurring elements combine to create molecules, cells, tissues, organ systems, and organisms

Subject:
Applied Science
Material Type:
Module
Date Added:
09/20/2018
Chemical and Biological Reaction Engineering, Spring 2007
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Introduces the design of chemical reactors via synthesis of chemical kinetics, transport phenomena, and mass and energy balances. Topics: reaction mechanisms and chemical/biochemical pathways; transition-state theory; batch, plug flow and well-stirred reactors; heterogeneous and enzymatic catalysis; heat and mass transport in reactors, including diffusion to and within catalyst particles and cells or immobilized enzymes.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Green, William Jr.
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Engineering Physics I (PHYS 221)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

This course covers the major topics of mechanics, including momentum and energy conservation, kinematics, Newton‰ŰŞs laws and equilibrium. The major emphasis is to develop critical analysis, problem solving and scientific reasoning skills by considering numerous different systems and interactions, solving problems and discussion. It uses a systematic approach based on modeling systems by application of basic physics principles, making assumptions, utilizing multiple representations (not just mathematical) in order to become proficient at problem solving. Lab work is required and is designed to help students develop a questioning approach to physical situations, distinguishing the significant behaviors from the less significant behaviors of a system under study.Login: guest_oclPassword: ocl

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Simulation
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
10/31/2011
General Chemistry II
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

This second-semester course will cover several of the tools needed to study chemistry at a more advanced level. We will identify the factors that affect the speed of a reaction, learn how an atom bomb works on a chemical level, and discover how chemistry powers a light bulb. We will end with discussion of organic chemistry, a topic that is as important to biology as it is to chemistry. (Chemistry 102; See also: Biology 106)

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Intermediate Microeconomics
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

This course is designed to extend the student's knowledge of the basic microeconomic principles that will provide the foundation for their future work in economics and give them insight into how economic models can help us think about important real world phenomena. Topics include supply and demand interaction, utility maximization, profit maximization, elasticity, perfect competition, monopoly power, imperfect competition, and game theory. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Explain the standard theory in microeconomics at an intermediate level; Explain and use the basic tools of microeconomic theory, and apply them to help address problems in public policy; Analyze the role of markets in allocating scarce resources; Explain both competitive markets, for which basic models of supply and demand are most appropriate, and markets in which agents act strategically, for which game theory is the more appropriate tool; Synthesize the impact of government intervention in the market; Develop quantitative skills in doing economic cost and consumer analysis using calculus; Compare and contrast arguments concerning business and politics, and make good conjectures regarding the possible solutions; Analyze the economic behavior of individuals and firms, and explore how they respond to changes in the opportunities and constraints that they face and how they interact in markets; Apply basic tools that are used in many fields of economics, including household economics, labor economics, production theory, international economics, natural resource economics, public finance, and capital markets. (Economics 201)

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Mechanics I
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

Mechanics studies how forces affect bodies in motion--how, for example, a bullet is fired from a gun, or a top is set in motion by the flick of a wrist. This course will introduce the student to the core concepts of mechanics as applied to design, testing, and manufacture of safe and reliable products. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify and use units, notations, and vectors used in mechanics; Identify and explain the concepts of forces, couples, and moments; Use the concept of forces and moments to compute resultants and equivalent systems in mechanics; Analyze mechanics of rigid bodies, such as trusses, frames, and machines; Identify and explain the concepts of friction and internal forces; Compute material properties of solid bodies, such as moments of inertia and mass moments of inertia; Compute strain and stress and understand the relationship of stress and strain for both elastic and plastic bodies; Compute stresses and strain in bodies subjected to tension and torsion; Compute stresses and strain in pressure vessels and composites; Identify and explain the concept of stress tensor and the constitutive relationship between strain and stress; Compute stresses and strain in simple and composite beams due to bending; Explain how stress is computed experimentally or using finite element formulations; Identify and explain material failure scenarios, such as fracture, fatigue, creep, and buckling. (Mechanical Engineering 102)

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Mechanics and Materials I, Fall 2006
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Introduction to statics and the mechanics of deformable solids. Emphasis on the three basic principles of equilibrium, geometric compatibility, and material behavior. Stress and its relation to force and moment; strain and its relation to displacement; linear elasticity with thermal expansion. Failure modes. Application to simple engineering structures such as rods, shafts, beams, and trusses. Application to design. Introduction to material selection. This course provides an introduction to the mechanics of solids with applications to science and engineering. We emphasize the three essential features of all mechanics analyses, namely: (a) the geometry of the motion and/or deformation of the structure, and conditions of geometric fit, (b) the forces on and within structures and assemblages; and (c) the physical aspects of the structural system (including material properties) which quantify relations between the forces and motions/deformation.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Socrate, Simona
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Physical Chemistry I
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

In this course, the student will learn about the three laws of thermodynamics, thermodynamic principles, ideal and real gases, phases of matter, equations of state, and state changes. The student will also take a look at chemical kinetics--a branch of study concerned with the rates of reactions and other processes--as well as kinetic molecular theory and statistical mechanics, which relate the atomic-level motion of a large number of particles to the average thermodynamic behavior of the system as a whole. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: State and use laws of thermodynamics; Perform calculations with ideal and real gases; Design practical engines by using thermodynamic cycles; Predict chemical equilibrium and spontaneity of reactions by using thermodynamic principles; Describe the thermodynamic properties of ideal and real solutions; Define the phases of matter, describe phase changes, and interpret/construct phase diagrams; Relate macroscopic thermodynamic properties to microscopic states by using the principles of statistical thermodynamics; Describe reaction rates and then do calculations to determine them; Relate reaction kinetics to potential reaction mechanism; Calculate the temperature dependence of rate constants and relate that to activation energy; Describe a variety of complex reactions; Describe catalysis; Describe enzymatic catalysis. (Chemistry 105)

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Principles of Macroeconomics 2e
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Principles of Macroeconomics 2e covers the scope and sequence of most introductory economics courses. The text includes many current examples, which are handled in a politically equitable way. The outcome is a balanced approach to the theory and application of economics concepts. The second edition has been thoroughly revised to increase clarity, update data and current event impacts, and incorporate the feedback from many reviewers and adopters. Changes made in Principles of Macroeconomics 2e are described in the preface and the transition guide to help instructors transition to the second edition. The first edition of Principles of Macroeconomics by OpenStax is available in web view here.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
06/29/2017
Principles of Macroeconomics 2e, Demand and Supply, Demand, Supply, and Efficiency
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

By the end of this section, you will be able to:
Contrast consumer surplus, producer surplus, and social surplus
Explain why price floors and price ceilings can be inefficient
Analyze demand and supply as a social adjustment mechanism

Subject:
Applied Science
Material Type:
Module
Date Added:
09/20/2018
Principles of Macroeconomics 2e, Demand and Supply, Demand, Supply, and Equilibrium in Markets for Goods and Services
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

By the end of this section, you will be able to:

Explain demand, quantity demanded, and the law of demand
Identify a demand curve and a supply curve
Explain supply, quantity supplied, and the law of supply
Explain equilibrium, equilibrium price, and equilibrium quantity

Subject:
Applied Science
Material Type:
Module
Date Added:
09/20/2018