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Cultural History of Technology, Spring 2005
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The subject of this course is the historical process by which the meaning of "technology" has been constructed. Although the word itself is traceable to the ancient Greek root teckhne (meaning art), it did not enter the English language until the 17th century, and did not acquire its current meaning until after World War I. The aim of the course, then, is to explore various sectors of industrializing 19th and 20th century Western society and culture with a view to explaining and assessing the emergence of technology as a pivotal word (and concept) in contemporary (especially Anglo-American) thought and expression.

Subject:
Applied Science
Arts and Humanities
Career and Technical Education
Engineering
Manufacturing
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Marx, Leo
Williams, Rosalind
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Development of Inventions and Creative Ideas, Spring 2008
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Role of the engineer as patent expert and as technical witness in court and patent interference and related proceedings. Rights and obligations of engineers in connection with educational institutions, government, and large and small businesses. Various manners of transplanting inventions into business operations, including development of New England and other US electronics and biotech industries and their different types of institutions. American systems of incentive to creativity apart from the patent laws in the atomic energy and space fields. For graduate students only; others see 6.901.

Subject:
Applied Science
Engineering
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Rines, Robert
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Disease and Society in America, Fall 2005
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course examines the growing importance of medicine in culture, economics and politics. It uses an historical approach to examine the changing patterns of disease, the causes of morbidity and mortality, the evolution of medical theory and practice, the development of hospitals and the medical profession, the rise of the biomedical research industry, and the ethics of health care in America.

Subject:
Economics
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jones, David
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Electricity and Magnetism, Spring 2005
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This freshman-level course is the second semester of introductory physics. The focus is on electricity and magnetism The subject is taught using the TEAL (Technology Enabled Active Learning) format which utilizes small group interaction and current technology. The TEAL/Studio Project at MIT is a new approach to physics education designed to help students develop much better intuition about, and conceptual models of, physical phenomena.

Subject:
Chemistry
Physical Science
Physics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
John Belcher
Date Added:
05/17/2004
Ethics and Public Policy
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This course will provide the student with an overview of the role that ethical, cultural, religious, and moral principles play in public policy. The course will introduce the student to common themes found in the foundational theories of ethics and morality in politics such as justice, equality, fairness, individual liberty, free enterprise, charity, fundamental human rights, and minimizing harm to others. These themes are integrated into various decision-making models that you will learn about. Students will examine five types of decision frameworks used to make and implement public policy, as well as rationales used to justify inequitable impact and outcomes of policies. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explain how personal morality and ethics impact the policymaking process; discuss various ethical frameworks used to resolve policy dilemmas; identify statutes, ethical codes, and legal opinions that define the normative parameters of key domestic and international policy issues; assess the impact that public interest groups have on policymaking and execution of policies. (Political Science 401)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/29/2019
Ethnography, Spring 2003
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CC BY-NC-SA
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A practicum-style course in anthropological methods of ethnographic fieldwork and writing, intended especially for STS, CMS, HTC, and Sloan graduate students, but open to others with permission of instructor. Depending on student experience in ethnographic reading and practice, the subject is a mix of reading anthropological and science studies ethnographies; and formulating and pursuing ethnographic work in local labs, companies, or other sites.

Subject:
Anthropology
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Dumit, Joseph
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Food and Power in the Twentieth Century, Spring 2005
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In this class, food serves as both the subject and the object of historical analysis. As a subject, food has been transformed over the last 100 years, largely as a result of ever more elaborate scientific and technological innovations. From a need to preserve surplus foods for leaner times grew an elaborate array of techniques -- drying, freezing, canning, salting, etc -- that changed not only what people ate, but how far they could/had to travel, the space in which they lived, their relations with neighbors and relatives, and most of all, their place in the economic order of things. The role of capitalism in supporting and extending food preservation and development was fundamental. As an object, food offers us a way into cultural, political, economic, and techno-scientific history. Long ignored by historians of science and technology, food offers a rich source for exploring, e.g., the creation and maintenance of mass-production techniques, industrial farming initiatives, the politics of consumption, vertical integration of business firms, globalization, changing race and gender identities, labor movements, and so forth. How is food different in these contexts, from other sorts of industrial goods? What does the trip from farm to table tell us about American culture and history?

Subject:
Economics
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Fitzgerald, Deborah
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings, Fall 2010
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This design-based subject provides a first course in energy and thermo-sciences with applications to sustainable energy-efficient architecture and building technology. No previous experience with subject matter is assumed. After taking this subject, students will understand introductory thermodynamics and heat transfer, know the leading order factors in building energy use, and have creatively employed their understanding of energy fundamentals and knowledge of building energy use in innovative building design projects. This year, the focus will be on design projects that will complement the new NSTAR/MIT campus efficiency program.

Subject:
Applied Science
Architecture and Design
Ecology
Education
Educational Technology
Engineering
Environmental Science
Forestry and Agriculture
Natural Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Glicksman, Leon
Glicksman, Leon R
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Gender, Race, and the Complexities of Science and Technology: A Problem-Based Learning Experiment
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"What can we learn about science and technology--and what can we do with that knowledge? Who are "we" in these questions?--whose knowledge and expertise gets made into public policy, new medicines, topics of cultural and political discourse, science education, and so on? How can expertise and lay knowledge about science and technology be reconciled in a democratic society? How can we make sense of the interactions of living and non-living, humans and non-humans, individual and collectivities in the production of scientific knowledge and technologies? The course takes these questions as entry points into an ever-growing body of work to which feminist, anti-racist, and other critical analysts and activists have made significant contributions. The course also takes these questions as an invitation to practice challenging the barriers of expertise, gender, race, class, and place that restrict wider access to and understanding of the production of scientific knowledge and technologies. In that spirit, students participate in an innovative, problem-based learning (PBL) approach that allows them to shape their own directions of inquiry and develop their skills as investigators and prospective teachers. At the same time the PBL cases engage students' critical faculties as they learn about existing analyses of gender, race, and the complexities of science and technology, guided by individualized bibliographies co-constructed with the instructors and by the projects of the other students. Students from all fields and levels of preparation are encouraged to join the course."

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Fausto-Sterling, Anne
Taylor, Peter
Date Added:
01/01/2009
Genetics, Fall 2004
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The principles of genetics with application to the study of biological function at the level of molecules, cells, and multicellular organisms, including humans. Structure and function of genes, chromosomes and genomes. Biological variation resulting from recombination, mutation, and selection. Population genetics. Use of genetic methods to analyze protein function, gene regulation and inherited disease.

Subject:
Biology
Education
Genetics
Natural Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Student Guide
Syllabus
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Fink, Gerald
Kaiser, Chris
Mischke, Michelle
Samson, Leona
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Geology of the National Parks
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Geysers and grizzlies and glaciers, oh my. The national parks may be America's best idea, saving the finest parts of the nation for everyone to enjoy forever. What better way to learn about the natural world than to tour the parks with us? We'll explore how the mountains and valleys formed and why they often come with volcanoes and earthquakes. You'll see what really killed the dinosaurs and how we can help save their modern relatives in the parks. With film clips, slide shows, and our geological interpretations of classic rock songs, isn't it time for a road trip?

Subject:
Applied Science
Biology
Ecology
Environmental Science
Geology
Natural Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State University
Provider Set:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http:// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Richard Alley
Sridhar Anandakrishnan
Date Added:
04/25/2019
Global Africa: Creative Cultures (Spring 2018)
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course examines contemporary and historical cultural production on and from Africa across a range of registers, including literary, musical and visual arts, material culture, and science and technology. It employs key theoretical concepts from anthropology and social theory to analyze these forms and phenomena. It also uses case studies to consider how Africa articulates its place in, and relationship to, the world through creative practices. Discussion topics are largely drawn from Francophone and sub-Saharan Africa, but also from throughout the continent and the African diaspora.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
M. Amah Edoh
Date Added:
04/25/2019
Global Warming Science
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CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

Many of our readers will no doubt already be familiar with MIT˘ď‹ď_s excellent OpenCourseWare (OCW), which offers free college-level curricula online to the public. The OpenCourseWare site is well worth a browse, as it offers courses on a variety of useful and engaging subjects such as business, health and medicine, mathematics, fine arts and science. This particular course, which was originally offered to undergraduate students in the spring of 2012, looks at the science behind global warming. Content includes lecture notes, assignments and student projects. The content could be used as a springboard for instructors teaching similar classes, or may prove useful to curious individuals looking to learn more about this timely and important topic.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Date Added:
08/01/2013
The History of Computing, Spring 2004
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Examines the development of computing techniques and technology in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, particularly critical evaluation of how the very idea of "computer" changes and evolves over time. Emphasis is on technical innovation, industrial development, social context, and the role of government. Topics include Babbage, Hollerith, differential analyzers, control systems, ENIAC, radar, operations research, computers as scientific instruments, the rise of "computer science," artificial intelligence, personal computers, and networks. Includes class visits by members of the MIT community who have made important historical contributions. This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants' memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists, and anthropologists of science to provide multiple perspectives on the use of computers in diverse fields of physical, biological, and social sciences and the humanities. We explore how the computer transformed scientific practice, and how the culture of computing was influenced, in turn, by scientific applications.

Subject:
Applied Science
Computer Science
Linguistics
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Gerovitch, Slava
Date Added:
01/01/2004
History of Science, Fall 2015
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This course offers an introduction to the history and historiography of science from ancient Greece to the present. It is designed to serve as an introduction for those who have no prior background in the field and to deepen the knowledge of those who already do. We will consider how the history of science has responded to its encounters with philosophy, sociology, economics, and anthropology. Our readings and discussions will focus on determining what makes particular works effective, understanding major contemporary trends and debates in the history of science, and establishing resources for further research.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Robin Scheffler
Date Added:
01/01/2015
International Environmental Negotiation, Fall 2010
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CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

This seminar will explore the difficulties of getting agreement on global definitions of sustainability; in particularly building international support for efforts to combat climate change created by greenhouse gas emissions as well as other international resource management efforts. We will focus on possible changes in the way global environmental agreements are formulated and implemented, especially on ways of shifting from the current "pollution control" approach to combating climate change to a more comprehensive strategy for taking advantage of sustainable development opportunities.

Subject:
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Natural Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Moomaw, William
Susskind, Lawrence
Susskind, Prof. Lawrence
Date Added:
01/01/2009
Introduction to Biology, Fall 2004
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.

Subject:
Biology
Natural Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Introduction to Computer Science and Programming, Spring 2011
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CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

This subject is aimed at students with little or no programming experience. It aims to provide students with an understanding of the role computation can play in solving problems. It also aims to help students, regardless of their major, to feel justifiably confident of their ability to write small programs that allow them to accomplish useful goals. The class will use the Python programming language.

Subject:
Applied Science
Computer Science
Education
Engineering
Information Science
Mathematics
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Textbook
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Guttag, John
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Introduction to Electric Power Systems, Spring 2011
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CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

This course is an introductory subject in the field of electric power systems and electrical to mechanical energy conversion. Electric power has become increasingly important as a way of transmitting and transforming energy in industrial, military and transportation uses. Electric power systems are also at the heart of alternative energy systems, including wind and solar electric, geothermal and small scale hydroelectric generation.

Subject:
Applied Science
Computer Science
Education
Engineering
Material Type:
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kirtley, James
Kirtley, James L.
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Introduction to the Modeling and Analysis of Complex Systems
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CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

Introduction to the Modeling and Analysis of Complex Systems introduces students to mathematical/computational modeling and analysis developed in the emerging interdisciplinary field of Complex Systems Science. Complex systems are systems made of a large number of microscopic components interacting with each other in nontrivial ways. Many real-world systems can be understood as complex systems, where critically important information resides in the relationships between the parts and not necessarily within the parts themselves. This textbook offers an accessible yet technically-oriented introduction to the modeling and analysis of complex systems. The topics covered include: fundamentals of modeling, basics of dynamical systems, discrete-time models, continuous-time models, bifurcations, chaos, cellular automata, continuous field models, static networks, dynamic networks, and agent-based models. Most of these topics are discussed in two chapters, one focusing on computational modeling and the other on mathematical analysis. This unique approach provides a comprehensive view of related concepts and techniques, and allows readers and instructors to flexibly choose relevant materials based on their objectives and needs. Python sample codes are provided for each modeling example.

Reviews available here: https://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/textbooks/introduction-to-the-modeling-and-analysis-of-complex-systems

Subject:
Applied Science
Computer Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Textbook
Provider:
State University of New York
Provider Set:
OpenSUNY Textbooks
Author:
Binghamton University
Hiroki Sayama
State University of New York.
Date Added:
08/13/2015